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08-31 Queensryche's Behind the Walls
07-22 New Queensryche Song, Forest
06-23 Queensryche's In Extremis
10-16 Rockenfield Sues Queensryche
07-03 Guitarist leaving Queensrÿche


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Queensryche

Although they were initially grouped with the legions of pop-metal bands that dominated the American heavy metal scene of the '80s, Queensrÿche were one of the most distinctive bands of the era. Where their contemporaries built on the legacy of Van Halen, Aerosmith, and Kiss, Queensrÿche constructed a progressive form of heavy metal that drew equally from the guitar pyrotechnics of post-Van Halen metal and '70s art rock, most notably Pink Floyd and Queen. After releasing a handful of ignored albums, the band began to break into the mainstream with the acclaimed 1988 album Operation: Mindc ...read more

Although they were initially grouped with the legions of pop-metal bands that dominated the American heavy metal scene of the '80s, Queensrÿche were one of the most distinctive bands of the era. Where their contemporaries built on the legacy of Van Halen, Aerosmith, and Kiss, Queensrÿche constructed a progressive form of heavy metal that drew equally from the guitar pyrotechnics of post-Van Halen metal and '70s art rock, most notably Pink Floyd and Queen. After releasing a handful of ignored albums, the band began to break into the mainstream with the acclaimed 1988 album Operation: Mindcrime. Its follow-up, Empire, was the group's biggest success, selling over two million copies due to the hit single "Silent Lucidity." Queensrÿche never sustained that widespread popularity -- like most late-'80s metal bands, their audience disappeared after the emergence of grunge. Nevertheless, they retained a large cult following well into the ensuing decades.Guitarists Chris DeGarmo and Michael Wilton formed Queensrÿche in 1981 in the Seattle, WA, suburb of Bellevue. Both guitarists had been playing in heavy metal cover bands and had decided to form a group that would play original material. The duo recruited high school friends Geoff Tate (vocals) and bassist Eddie Jackson (bass), as well as drummer Scott Rockenfield. Instead of hitting the club circuit, the group rehearsed for two years, eventually recording and releasing a four-song demo tape. The cassette came to the attention of local record store owners Kim and Diana Harris, who offered to manage Queensrÿche. With the help of the Harrises, the tape circulated throughout the Northwest. In May of 1983, Queensrÿche released the EP Queen of the Reich on their own record label, 206 Records. Queen of the Reich sold 20,000 copies and, in the process, earned the band major-label attention. By the end of the year, the band signed to EMI, which released an expanded version of the EP as the Queensrÿche EP later in the year; the record peaked at number 81.At this stage, Queensrÿche sounded closer to British metal bands like Iron Maiden and Judas Priest. Over the next few years, the group continued to refine its sound, opening for hard rock acts as diverse as Bon Jovi and Metallica. Their next two albums -- 1984's The Warning and 1986's Rage for Order -- sold respectably, with the latter reaching number 47 on the U.S. charts. Rage for Order also demonstrated a flowering of progressive rock influences, an idea that would reach its fruition with 1988's Operation: Mindcrime. Boasting orchestral arrangements from Michael Kamen, the album was Queensrÿche's most ambitious and focused effort to date, earning both positive reviews and strong sales. Operation: Mindcrime stayed on the American charts for a year, selling over a million copies during its run.Queensrÿche returned in the fall of 1990 with the equally ambitious Empire. The album proved to be their commercial high watermark, peaking at number seven on the U.S. charts and going double platinum in America; in the U.K., the album also cracked the Top Ten. Empire's success was instigated by the stately art rock ballad "Silent Lucidity," which received heavy airplay from MTV and album rock radio. All the exposure eventually sent "Silent Lucidity" to number five on the U.S. singles charts. Following the long Empire tour -- which included a spot on the 1991 Monsters of Rock tour -- Queensrÿche released the live Operation: Livecrime in the fall of 1991. Recorded on the Operation: Mindcrime tour, the album replicated the group's live performance of the rock opera that comprised their 1988 artistic breakthrough; the package also included a video and a thick book.In the three years following the release of Operation: Livecrime, the band rested and leisurely worked on the follow-up to Empire. Occasionally, they contributed a song to a soundtrack, such as "Real World" for Arnold Schwarzenegger's 1993 movie Last Action Hero. Queensrÿche finally delivered their sixth studio album, Promised Land, in 1994. Though the heavy metal audience had changed drastically since Empire, with many fair-weather metal fans switching their allegiance to grunge and alternative rock, the group retained a strong following, as evidenced by Promised Land debuting at number three on the U.S. charts. Promised Land would eventually go platinum and spawn two album rockhits, "I Am I" and "Bridge."With 1997's Hear in the New Frontier, Queensrÿche stripped back their sound to the bare bones, leaving behind the prog rock influences that made them distinctive. Although the album debuted at 19, it received mixed reviews and quickly fell down the charts, leading shortly thereafter to founding guitarist Chris DeGarmo's exit from the band. (DeGarmo would soon resurface as part of former Alice in Chains' guitarist Jerry Cantrell's touring band.) Q2k followed in 1999, as new guitarist Kelly Gray took DeGarmo's place. Queensrÿche's first best-of set, Greatest Hits,was released in 2000; the band supported the CD with an opening slot on one of the year's hottest metal concert tickets -- Iron Maiden's Brave New World reunion tour, which also included former Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford. In 2001, the band issued a double CD/DVD package titled Live Evolution. Meanwhile, former member DeGarmo formed a new band with Alice in Chains drummer Sean Kinney, bassist Mike Inez, and Sponge vocalist Vin Dombroski called Spys4Darwin. They released the EP Microfish in 2001 on their own record label, Pied Viper Records. DeGarmo also appeared on Jerry Cantrell's Degradation Trip in 2002. He then rejoined forces with Queensrÿche for a brief spell, appearing on the band's subsequent album, 2003's Tribe, but never officially joining the lineup. Three years later, Queensrÿche (sans DeGarmo, who had become a professional charter pilot) released Operation: Mindcrime II, the long-awaited sequel to their 1988 conceptual smash. 2007 saw the dual release of Sign of the Times: The Best of Queensrÿche and Take Cover, the latter of which featured cover versions of songs by U2, Buffalo Springfield, and Andrew Lloyd Webber. During the following two years, Geoff Tate launched a series of one-on-one interviews with various military vets; he then funneled what he'd learned into the band's next project, a concept album about war named American Soldier. Produced by Jason Slater (who had also helmed Operation: Mindcrime II), the album was released in March 2009. After the release of the album, the band set out on the conceptual Queensrÿche Cabaret tour, merging the band's prog sound with a wild, cabaret aesthetic. The band also went overseas to Iraq to play the music of their American Soldier album for the troops that it was written for. While over there, they found themselves the victims of a bomb attack, but came out of the ordeal unscathed. Later that year, Queensrÿche announced that they were working on new material, and in 2011 released their eleventh studio album, Dedicated to Chaos.In 2012, after 30 years with the band, Tate announced he was leaving the band after disputes with the other members, and decided to form his own version of Queensrÿche with Kelly Gray (guitar; ex-Queensrÿche ), Randy Gane (keyboard), Rudy Sarzo (bass; ex-Ozzy, ex-Quiet Riot, ex-Whitesnake, etc.), Robert Sarzo (guitar), and Simon Wright (drums; ex-AC/DC, ex-Dio). The remaining members of Queensrÿche recruited ex-Crimson Glory vocalist Todd La Torre. Tate's Queensrÿche released their first album, Frequency Unknown, in April 2013. Todd La Torre's Queensrÿche released an eponymous album in June of 2013, then followed it up with two more LPs, Condition Human in 2015 and The Verdict in 2019. « hide

Similar Bands: Fates Warning, Iron Maiden, Savatage, Crimson Glory, Dream Theater

LPs
Digital Noise Alliance
2022

3.6
75 Votes
The Verdict
2019

3.6
114 Votes
Condition Human
2015

3.6
190 Votes
Queensryche
06/25/2013

3.6
334 Votes
Frequency Unknown (Tate's Queensryche)
04/23/2013

1.6
304 Votes
Dedicated to Chaos
2011

1.4
356 Votes
American Soldier
2009

2.8
261 Votes
Operation: Mindcrime II
2006

2.4
396 Votes
Tribe
2003

2.7
252 Votes
Q2K
1999

2.4
244 Votes
Hear in the Now Frontier
1997

2.5
288 Votes
Promised Land
1994

3.8
457 Votes
Empire
1990

3.9
735 Votes
Operation: Mindcrime
1988

4.4
1,573 Votes
Rage for Order
1986

4.1
562 Votes
The Warning
1984

3.8
453 Votes
EPs
Overseeing the Operation
1989

3.9
11 Votes
Queensryche EP
1983

4
331 Votes
Live Albums
10 Live!
2014

3.8
2 Votes
Storming Detroit Live 1984
2014

4.3
3 Votes
Mindcrime at the Moore
2007

3.4
33 Votes
Extended Versions
2007

3.3
2 Votes
The Art of Live
2004

2.8
19 Votes
Live Evolution
2001

3.4
40 Votes
Operation: Livecrime
1991

4.3
92 Votes
Live in Tokyo
1985

4.4
8 Votes
Compilations
Frequency Unknown (Deluxe Edition)
2014

1.5
7 Votes
Silent Lucidity - Greatest Hits
04/23/2013

2
2 Votes
10 Great Songs
2011

Empire - 20th Anniversary Edition
2010

4.4
6 Votes
Take Cover
2007

2
89 Votes
Sign Of The Times
2007

3.7
13 Votes
Operation: Mindcrime (Deluxe Edition)
2006

4.4
14 Votes
Revolution Calling
2003

4.2
9 Votes
Greatest Hits
2000

3.9
77 Votes
Operation: Mindcrime/Queen Of The Reich
1999

4.5
4 Votes

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