King Crimson
Discipline


4.5
superb

Review

by Nagrarok USER (219 Reviews)
June 3rd, 2010 | 59 replies


Release Date: 1981 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A new Crimson King is born unto the 80's... and it's as vital as it's ever been.

After last swansong and post-breakup release Red, King Crimson, pioneers of the early 70’s progressive rock movement, were as dead as a doornail. As creative leader Robert Fripp stated, the group and its spirit had ‘ceased to exist’. The remaining trio went separate ways: Fripp became a frequent collaborator with other artists; Brian Eno, Blondie and Talking Heads, among others, and also released two solo albums called Exposure and God Save the Queen/Under Heavy Manners. Wetton would go on to play in Roxy Music and Uriah Heep and eventually ended up forming prog/pop supergroup Asia with Yes’ Steve Howe and Emerson, Lake and Palmer’s Carl Palmer, which is still active today. Bruford spent his time forming his own little jazz-fusion band Bruford and doing some tour drumming for Genesis, and one thing seemed clear: King Crimson’s chances of reforming were extremely thin.

But even though he has denied his role as sole leader of the group in the past, the only one who has final control over King Crimson in the end is no other than Robert Fripp. After being done with appearing with artists, the guitarist was hungering for a new project more his own, and contacted Bruford to form a new band. The two got together and subsequently found vocalist/guitarist Adrian Belew (the first American ever to enter Crimson), another experienced session player with influential artists such as Frank Zappa and David Bowie. Somewhat unexpectedly, bassist Tony Levin (who had played bass on Fripp’s solo albums and has been a longtime bass player for Peter Gabriel) walked in to complete the new group, then called Discipline.

When all was said and done, however, Discipline ridded themselves of their name and officially became a reborn King Crimson. A fitting choice, as the last formation the group had included both Fripp and Bruford. Despite that, the leap from the 70’s to the 80’s, in terms of sound, has been the most extreme for the group so far. This was however exactly what Fripp had wanted. He wanted to experiment with two guitars in a band, a reason why he chose to recruit Belew. More importantly even, the new front figure brought, aside from a second guitar, a very strong New Wave-influence with him, something which he undoubtedly picked up on his frequent collaborations with the Talking Heads. In effect, the first King Crimson album following a seven-year hiatus, entitled Disclipine after the initial name of the formation, has even been critisised as a Talking Heads-rip-off by some. While the influence is obvious, especially in Belew’s David Byrne-esque vocal acrobatics and increased use of electronic devices (Fripp’s self-invented Frippertronics), the main comparisons stop there. Discipline is, luckily, still very much a King Crimson record, and the darker sounds and typical charisma, quirkiness and innovation of the group’s first decade are very prominent still.

The best thing about the album are its vocal tracks, most prominently influenced by the New Wave of the 80’s. Belew goes nuts with his paranoid performance and lyrics, and Levin’s newly introduced instrument the Chapman Stick (a guitar-like tapping device which can produce sounds in the same range as a regular bass guitar, but sounds quite different) creates even more eclectic manner into the mix. It is him who kicks off opener Elephant Talk with immediate flair and surprise, providing the perfect opening for the album and its utterly different sound. Belew is most humorous and entertaining, as he sings:

'Talk/It's only talk
Arguments, Agreements, Advice, Answers , Articulate announcements
It's only talk

Talk /It's only talk
Babble, Burble, Banter ,Bicker/bicker/bicker, Brouhaha, Boulderdash, Ballyhoo
It's only talk/ Back talk

Talk talk talk/It's only talk
Comments , Cliches, Commentary, Controversy, Chatter, Chit-chat/Chit-chat/Chit-chat, Conversation, Contradiction, Criticism
It's only talk/Cheap talk'


After Belew is done naming as much words as he can think of from A to E, Frame by Frame kicks in with a similar fashion, but quickly proves to be far less chaotic. Belew is, as he is throughout the entire album, very inspired, and produces vocals of a pleasantly dreamy, surreal quality as the music that accompanies him moves around the vocals as eclectic as ever, Levin’s tight bass work supporting the nicely interlocking guitar lines that have been made possible with the addition of a second guitar. Matte Kudasai, the shortest tracks on the album, is completely relaxed and a welcome change of pace. The nostalgic-sounding track is provided with lush instrumentation and more perfectly fitting lyrics and vocals from Belew:

'Still, by the window pane,
Pain, like the rain that's falling.
She waits in the air,
Matte Kudasai.
She sleeps in a chair
In her sad America.

When, when was the night so long,
Long, like the notes I'm sending.
She waits in the air,
Matte Kudasai.
She sleeps in a chair
In her sad America.'


The last and longest vocal track on Discipline is the brilliant but often more overlooked Thela Hun Ginjeet (an anagram of 'Heat in the Jungle'). As has become usual by this point, Belew is the main selling point, moving from his initial vocals to a background narrative which provides some insight on the making of the album, and is quite hilarious at the same time. The instrumental work, solid and consistent with the rest of the album, has a positively funky edge to it.

The darker features of 70’s King Crimson can be best heard in the predominantly instrumental tracks, which, as in the Wetton-led Crimson, still occupy a great part of the album. The title track is full proof that Fripp could still churn out those menacing, grinding guitar sounds he became so famous for in the scene, Indiscipline is surprisingly and effectively minimalistic and The Sheltering Sky is a captivating soundscape, with a dominant performance of Frippertronics, African-sounding percussion and piercing guitar lines. With these instrumentals, the new Crimson once again showed how well its members could feed off each other musically, and provide intriguing moments.

It all shows that Discipline is a success in many aspects: not only did it revive the name of King Crimson, it showed that once again Fripp and company could adapt a radically different sound successfully, and stay true to their roots at the same time. Genesis gave up their roots in the 80’s to opt for a commercial approach, and so did fellow prog giant Yes. King Crimson remained a true progressive band, not giving in to a changing musical environment, but rather adapting to it. That alone makes the album quite an accomplishment, and thanks to the refreshed sound and consistently entertaining tracks, Crimson’s eighth has become one of their finest works, standing right behind In the Court of the Crimson King and Red.

Discipline’s King Crimson was:

- Robert Fripp ~ Lead Guitar, Frippertronics
- Robert Steven ‘Adrian’ Belew ~ Lead Vocals, Rhythm Guitar
- Tony Levin ~ Chapman Stick, Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
- William Scott Bruford ~ Drums, Percussion


TO BE CONTINUED...



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4.2
excellent
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Comments:Add a Comment 
Nagrarok
June 3rd 2010


8603 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Their third best album. Expect Beat and Three of a Perfect Pair soon. Enjoy.

Meatplow
June 3rd 2010


5524 Comments


Along with Talking Heads Remain In Light (which I find a very similar New Wave flavoured release) I love this album to death.

Great review.

qwe3
June 3rd 2010


21814 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

hahaha every time i see a discipline or remain in light thread meatplows saying that. awesome review this is prob KC's best

Meatplow
June 3rd 2010


5524 Comments


i'm a broken record

at least he discussed it in the review so it was semi-relevant to mention

Nagrarok
June 3rd 2010


8603 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Along with Talking Heads Remain In Light (which I find a very similar New Wave flavoured release) I love this album to death.




Remain in Light is cool, although this is definitely not as similar to the Talking Heads as some claim it to be. Elephant Talk speaks for itself of course, but the other tracks are very much Crimson.



this is prob KC's best




Nah, this could never top either ITCOTKK or Red.

Meatplow
June 3rd 2010


5524 Comments


I never cared much for Red, ITCOTKK is great though. I've listened to this album the most, as far as i'm concerned its the best of the 3.

Remain in Light is cool, although this is definitely not as similar to the Talking Heads as some claim it to be.


Don't get me wrong each album definitely has its own unique character, there is just something about the not-so-subtle undercurrent of quirky New Wave appeal and similarities in production that lead me to make this comparison time and time again. This is disregarding the common presence of Belew, who I didn't even realise was the common link until long after I had both of these albums ingrained in my consciousness.

qwe3
June 3rd 2010


21814 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0





Nah, this could never top either ITCOTKK or Red.




this is muuuch better than red and I put it just above court

Nagrarok
June 3rd 2010


8603 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Many Crimson fans seem to regard this their best, although I prefer their late 60's/early 70's vibe. Most of their post-Discipline records don't top their earlier work.

Jethro42
June 3rd 2010


15977 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

You did it once again Nag! Very detailed and you back up very well your points. You clearly demonstrate us that King Crimson were still alive and faithful to their good old sound. Unlike most of the other famous 70s proggers who failed in taking the 80s pop oriented virage, KC have triumphantly maintained (most of) their good old formula and their original soundscape. Yes the 'new King Crimson era' did flirt a very little with new wave, but without losing their identity at all.

Also it'd be great to present Tony Levin like the long time bassman for Peter Gabriel

And finally;

Here's another 90s Fripp's honorable collaboration, David Sylvian.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4h5Fh7OT6bk

Nagrarok
June 3rd 2010


8603 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks Jethro, we seem to agree completely on this one.



Also it'd be great to present Tony Levin like the long time bassman of Peter Gabriel




Done.



The link didn't do much for me though.

Jethro42
June 3rd 2010


15977 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Damn straight man. Your rating makes me happy!



The link didn't do much for me though.



Levin was using the chapman stick long before he joined KC. That's why I consider Levin to be noteworth.

I forgot to mention that the song 'Discipline' is the closer. Not 'Indiscipline ;)

Nagrarok
June 3rd 2010


8603 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Levin was using the chapman stick long before he joined KC. That's why I consider Levin to be noteworth.




Yeah, I had already spent quite a bit of typing on where all the members gone and went, so I guess he got unluckily forgotten in the lot, for I did know he'd been playing for a much longer time.

foreverendeared
June 3rd 2010


14677 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Personally, I prefer Red over all other King Crimson albums.



Elephant talk always makes me smile.

Romulus
June 3rd 2010


8579 Comments


Great review, I remember you rec'd me In the Court... a while ago and I loved it, I'll definitely be checking out more of their stuff in the near future

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
June 4th 2010


32290 Comments


Great album/review

Nagrarok
June 4th 2010


8603 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks all.

Sabottheory
June 8th 2010


355 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Review rules.

mandan
March 4th 2013


13409 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5 | Sound Off

I've been wanting to hear this album for a loooooooong time.

mandan
April 7th 2013


13409 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5 | Sound Off

Finally started hearing this. Impressive stuff. "Elephant Talk" rules.

mandan
April 7th 2013


13409 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5 | Sound Off

Impressive melodies on "Frame by Frame".



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