Xarhanga
Bota Fora


4.0
excellent

Review

by ZIG USER (25 Reviews)
April 14th, 2022 | 9 replies


Release Date: 1975 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Portuguese prog goes political

Who would have thought that the mythical cavaquinho master, Júlio Pereira, was one of the musicians to boost progressive rock in Portugal. After his brief stint with the pioneers Petrus Castrus, Júlio Pereira embarked on a final rock work in 1975, together with another musician, Carlos Cavalheiro, a member of the band Alarme. They both went to dig up 1973's hard rock project Xarhanga and edited two singles for a last ditch effort.

The album, “Bota Fora”, presents itself as a strong political aspect, strongly marked by socialism and communism. The theme mainly addresses the situation in Portugal after the 25th of April, namely the Portuguese colonies, the consequences of the Colonial War (1961-1974), and the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola. The lyrics, unlike the music, are written by several musicians such as Fausto, José Mário Branco, Sérgio Godinho, and also by the poet Manuel Alegre, with the exception of the last track, authored by master Pereira.

On the musical side, Júlio Pereira is the great mastermind behind it all. Not only does the master play virtually all the instruments (the vocals are in charge of Carlos Cavalheiro), but he also composes all the music. This one is of exceptional quality, as it displays excellent musical technique and essential originality. The nine tracks are relatively short for the demands of prog rock, hovering between three and four minutes, which go straight to scare without leaving anything out. The sound is heavily influenced by bands like Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Genesis, Petrus Castrus, as well as some African music. Both the keys and the guitars are the focus of the songs in general.

In short, Bota Fora is a pearl of Portuguese prog, an obscure record that subtracts the prog rock made in the 1970s. Master Júlio Pereira and musician Carlos Cavalheiro leave a unique entrance full of good music and arrangements, which never fail to entertain. However, the lyrics end up being too much around a single theme, leaving the conceptual quality short of musical excellence. What is now a rare and very expensive LP, was at the time one of the pillars of Portuguese progressive rock.



Recent reviews by this author
Soft Machine The Soft MachineGlenn Branca Lesson No. 1
Ahmad Jamal At the Pershing: But Not for MeBig Country Steeltown
Herbie Hancock Empyrean IslesThelonious Monk Monk's Dream
user ratings (1)
4
excellent


Comments:Add a Comment 
Zig
April 14th 2022


2747 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

A hidden jam of Portuguese prog for the SputProggers.

parksungjoon
April 14th 2022


47234 Comments


sup

parksungjoon
April 15th 2022


47234 Comments


thoughts on the spanish symphoprog scene of the 70s>?

Zig
April 16th 2022


2747 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

hi park!

there's some interesting stuff on spanish prog, like Mezquita, Los Jaivas, and Ibio.

parksungjoon
April 16th 2022


47234 Comments


yea i added a bunch to the db a couple years ago

pleasantly surprised to see the progland club folks give mezquita a bunch of ratings last month

e210013
April 19th 2022


5319 Comments


Nice to see this reviewed here, Zig. This is a true unknown work even in Portugal, which is a pity. Pos.

Bom trabalho amigo. Afinal sempre o reviste. Tenho que tirar o pó ao meu velho vinil e voltar a ouvi-lo.

Jethro42
April 19th 2022


18281 Comments


Will check.

Zig
April 20th 2022


2747 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

That's for sure, e21!

Obrigado. Quando ouvires, partilha os teus pensamento aqui. Fico à espera ;)

Zig
April 20th 2022


2747 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

@Jethro

yeah, you should. hehe



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2023 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy