Dai Kaht
Dai Kaht II


4.5
superb

Review

by arf USER (2 Reviews)
December 17th, 2021 | 7 replies


Release Date: 2020 | Tracklist

Review Summary: High energy zeuhl in a space rock outfit

The story of Dai Kaht starts around 2013 in Kajaani, Finland, when Atte Kemppainen heeded the call of Magma and decided to embark on a mission to save another group of refugees from the dying Earth (Ẁurdah Ïtah) to new home, Doover Üouh being the name of the colony ship (take notes - this is one of the words you’ll hear in the lyrics) taking towards their destination, the planet Dai Kaht. Now called Alemaahr Kempah, he assembled a crew of likeminded musicians to spread the message. The lyrics on the first album dealt mostly with challenges on the journey to Dai Kaht, while this album is about the conflict between Hhaimland and Eterniya, the two territories established there. The material of both albums was already written in the first years of band’s existence, and live recordings of songs found on here that are much older than the release can be found.

Stylistically, Dai Kaht is pure Magma worship. The basslines and chants are very Magma, and even the lyrics are in a similar-sounding alien language, Kolöniel (which to my ear actually sounds like a dialect of Kobaïan - some words I can recognise, while others sound like new inventions.) What distinguishes Dai Kaht from most other zeuhl bands is their sound and musical approach. Dai Kaht has completely shed all jazz-fusion influences, opting instead for a more space rock-like sound (as one might already expect from the psychedelic dot art used on the cover). Instead of the horn section, you will find psychedelic guitar solos here. Overall, Dai Kaht is more cheerful than most zeuhl, though at some points (especially in the song Helvet Sttröi II) the darker side of zeuhl can also be found.

The strong points of Dai Kaht are their high energy (perhaps a result of their different approach to zeuhl), at times touching the boundary with brutal prog even, and wild vocal delivery. The bassist Alemaahr Kempah gets quite inventive with his voice and delivers the lyrics in Kolöniel with great pomp and articulacy. He is helped by the rest of the band to fill in for the chant sections. The riffs are extremely catchy, and the songs never feel lengthy or stretched out, something that can be a weak point of zeuhl to outsiders.

If the first album of Dai Kaht was perhaps still a bit restrained sounding, on this one the band has fully matured in sound, and delivered top-notch zeuhl. While it is not the most inventive zeuhl album - the experimental factor is completely missing here, it is filled with engaging and energetic zeuhl and should be considered as one of the essential recent zeuhl releases.


user ratings (1)
4.5
superb


Comments:Add a Comment 
arf
December 17th 2021


148 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Welp here goes another 4.5 review from my side. Maybe for the next one I'll review something I'm less overenthusiastic about.



Bandcamp: https://daikaht.bandcamp.com/album/dai-kaht-ii



Digging: Pensees Nocturnes - Douce Fange

parksungjoon
December 27th 2021


39352 Comments


interesting

someone
December 27th 2021


3936 Comments


fine, ill listen

arf
December 27th 2021


148 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

I am awaiting for someone to argue with me whether there is actually space rock present in here since honestly I'm not so sure myself but I don't know what else is it that I hear, and let's be honest it's in space so it gotta be space rock right?

someone
December 29th 2021


3936 Comments


okay fuck this is actually some fantastic stuff

where was this in the Friday's prog discovery series?

someone
December 29th 2021


3936 Comments


tbh wouldn't've noticed much zeuhl here, had i not read that they're a zeuhl band

it's spacey thanks to the synths and generally airy and echoic production, the journeying song-writing helps that impression too. but just epic song-writing can make anybody feel like they're on a spaceship, i don't see how that makes this particular album space rock. then again, space rock is such a loosely defined thing anyway, both this and Muse and The Killers technically count as space rock bands. had the cover here been some fantasy motif, i'd have assumed they're a Tolkien prog band or something.

arf
December 29th 2021


148 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

the only reason I found this is because they're on the dedicated zeuhl label, soleil zeuhl

was a refreshing listen compared to the rest of what passes as zeuhl nowadays. never drags, always goes



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