Nasty Savage
Indulgence


4.5
superb

Review

by Casavir USER (4 Reviews)
December 1st, 2021 | 23 replies


Release Date: 1987 | Tracklist

Review Summary: This is the ritual of divination...

From the release of their self-titled debut in 1985, Nasty Savage had filled the sort of niche occupied by the likes of comparable peers in the US metal scene such as Slauter Xstroyes or Juggernaut: dense, oddball and somewhat intense USPM with loads of compositional ambition derived from their influence from bands like Mercyful Fate. However, despite the now-renowned vigor with which they wrote music and promoted themselves by that point, the following couple years proved to be an even more busy and transformative time for these Floridans as they had undergone a crucial shift in their sound, The result was 1987’s Indulgence. A true American metal classic that would prove to be one of the most groundbreaking of its time.

At first glance, a lot of the band’s sound is seemingly intact from the debut but they have taken a lot of their off-kilter proceedings from prior songs like The Morgue, Asmodeus and No Sympathy and shoved them fully right front and center with heightened levels of aggression. Guitar duo, David Austin and Ben Meyer, had melted away the ‘80s trad heavy/power metal trot of songs like Metal Knights in their entirety, supplanted by even more oblique song structures, jagged riffing and eerie progressions. Prime examples of this are songs like the title track, Incursion Dementia and Distorted Fanatic, which all showcase panicked staccato rhythms with melodies pirouetting and melding together with crazed frenzy. Along with the rather forward presence of their new bassist, Dezsõ István Bartha underscoring the chaos with stalwart and varied melodies of his own on cuts such as Inferno, they had transformed themselves into one of the original technical thrash acts while at the same time avoiding emulating the likes of Watchtower or Voivod in the process.

More than anything, that was part of the additional dimension which put Nasty Savage in the same league as giants like those bands. They were no doubt as ambitious as them but had kept themselves tonally grounded in a bloody, street-level attitude even as they introduced an increasingly unnerving atmosphere and psychological/gory themes, which is likely what had made them so appealing to several death metal acts of the burgeoning Floridan death metal scene such as Obituary and of course Death. Tracks like Stabbed in the Back and XXX could even be described as having an Exodus-esque groove or heft to them but that’s what makes their stylistic metamorphosis here more profound as it doesn’t come off as plodding or derivative in any way despite them having become completely thrash by this point.

There is also the matter of the final element that I believe makes this a work that was truly ahead of the curve. The band's maintenance of the borderline hallucinogenic vibe that their writing possessed from their beginnings on songs like End of Time from the self-titled, particularly in the more mid-tempo moments. The apex of this being the last four or so songs, all of them (to my ears) being a kind of thrash metal spiritual predecessor to the floating buoyant turbulence the songwriting showcased on an album like Demilich’s Nespithe. Whether it is due to how the lead melodies unfold on this album or the drum patterns and fills of Curtis Beeson, this is probably the earliest album to really have that sort of feeling in metal by 1987 even with death metal already starting to officially congeal as a proper subgenre. While this would be exacerbated on their following EP and their third LP, Penetration Point, this is the point it began.

I have often seen Indulgence labelled as a lesser transitionary effort or an album that was behind the times relative to its peers but frankly, that could not be further from the truth. While not possessing the kind of futuristic or technophobic atmosphere of some of their peers or the cold, clinical vibe of Destruction’s Release from Agony or Deathrow’s Deception Ignored, they were a band that had embraced their prior aesthetics and injected them with as much technique as the rest, becoming innovators of their own. Indulgence stands as an equal to any of those albums and Nasty Savage had acquired an ironically inimitable identity. There are many bands today I can think of that may emulate Watchtower or Voivod or a slew of other bands in the same vein. There are precious few I can think of who have aspired to replicate Nasty Savage’s own brand of madness. Listen to this.


user ratings (24)
3.6
great


Comments:Add a Comment 
Casavir
December 1st 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

This deserved a review so I made one. Hope you guys like it.

JustJoe.
December 1st 2021


10925 Comments


i didn’t read it

JustJoe.
December 1st 2021


10925 Comments


pos tho

Viriathus
December 1st 2021


3442 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

It's a neat album

sonictheplumber
December 1st 2021


14272 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

:D

Casavir
December 1st 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

These guys knew their way around a riff, I tell ya hwat

parksungjoon
December 1st 2021


39265 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

good review



band/album is the real deal

parksungjoon
December 1st 2021


39265 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

John Tardy (Obituary) We moved from Miami to Tampa when we were young, and the first people we came in contact with in our neighborhood were the guys in Nasty Savage and Savatage. Those were the two bands that even got us interested in playing music.



James Murphy (Death, Obituary, Disincarnate) They really got the Florida bands going because they were making records, playing clubs, and going to Europe, and they showed us, "Hey, you, too, can make a band and get signed."



Glen Benton (Deicide) [Nasty Savage's singer] Ronnie Galetti used to have all these TV sets onstage that he'd smash, and I remember putting my fist through some of them. Talk about a show, the guy used to roll around in the glass from the TVs, and one night I saw his old lady pulling broken glass out of his back after the gig and I thought, Holy shit, this is the real deal.



Murphy As great as those bands were, they were far from death metal. [Death frontman] Chuck Schuldiner was the first one who played that kind of music. He was an avid record collector and was very into obscure European bands like Demon Eyes, Sortilège, H-Bomb, Torch, Trance, and Picture, as well as the really early German stuff like Sodom, Kreator, and Destruction, and that really helped shape his sound, but he wasn't copying anything. Even in 1983 when he made the Mantas demo, he was doing something unique.



Tardy We started Xecutioner in 1984 just as something to have fun with in our garage. The stuff we were doing back then, as silly as it was, happened because of the early Nasty Savage stuff. We had no idea what we were doing, but it didn't take us long to really develop the sound that we wanted.

Casavir
December 1st 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

I had actually forgotten that Glen talked about them at all. Honestly, one of the more impressive examples of them being given kudos was by Mark Edelmann of Coroner as well.



https://www.metal-rules.com/2012/04/28/coroner-marky-edelmann-aka-marquis-marky/



"I think they had a major influence on my music. I really liked Nasty Savage a lot. You can also hear some Nasty Savage in the Coroner songs if you listen closely."



I've sometimes seen Asmodeus (?) compared to Masked Jackal so that would make sense.

parksungjoon
December 1st 2021


39265 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

>I had actually forgotten that Glen talked about them at all.



glen auditioned for nasty savage in 1986

Casavir
December 1st 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

"glen auditioned for nasty savage in 1986"



Oooh, yeah. I think I remember that from a Ben Meyer interview. Thankfully, that never panned out.

DePlazz
December 1st 2021


3370 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Pos

ffs
December 1st 2021


5435 Comments


hell ye

Hyperion1001
Emeritus
December 1st 2021


21512 Comments


still contend this is the most underrated American metal band of all time.

great review, album slaps of course. penetration point might be my favorite but this one is the “classic” I think.

Digging: Cygnus - 100% Dope

Casavir
December 1st 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks, guys.



"great review, album slaps of course. penetration point might be my favorite but this one is the “classic” I think."



I'm in the same boat there.



Casavir
December 3rd 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

The title track is insane on this.

parksungjoon
December 3rd 2021


39265 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

feature this

Source
December 3rd 2021


19349 Comments


rocks

CaptainDooRight
December 4th 2021


5144 Comments


swee


Digging: Thanatos - Emerging from the Netherworlds

Casavir
December 4th 2021


4795 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Fun fact for the lineup of this band. The reason that Bartha left the band and had to be replaced by Chris Moorhouse on Abstract Reality was due to Bartha's father threatening to disinherit him. Nasty Savage probably had some of the worst luck with keeping awesome bassists for one reason or another.



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