Yukiga Futte Uresii
Chuusuu no Romero



Release Date: 08/10/2021 | Tracklist

Review Summary: death of the artist / death of the computer

Most people don’t listen to noise music, often for sound reasons. This is nice for them, but it has the rather enjoyable side-effect that the genre’s public image is defined less by the observations of an engaging audience and more by the reservations of those who would voluntarily seal themselves inside a separate universe. Thus for ‘most people’, noise isn’t not so much a concrete set of conventions and tropes (other than, well, noise), but rather a blurred shape scarcely visible within the orbit of comfortable, familiar arguments sceptical of its legitimacy as, say, actual music. From my experience, the reality is neither so mysterious nor so controversial, but since those arguments are out and about and very much handy (not to mention occasionally accurate), we might as well start there. Today this one is my favourite:

This sounds like no effort has been put into it whatsoever. Anyone could make music like this in like 5 minutes.

or something of that kind. You know the one. Music is precious because it’s the fruit of craft and intention; if we can’t sense intelligent design behind its every facet, surely it can’t be worth much. This line of thinking skirts the unique quality of live noise performances, but it does have a certain application to digitalised or generative sounds, the kind of thing that started in analogue as tape experiments but has long since mutated and crossed to DAW fuckery of the most dissociated order. With the power to phone in, generate, modulate, loop or structure sounds with a few mouse clicks, it’s easier than ever for your contemporary noise musician to unleash hell without having to engage with the inconveniences of quality control or realtime playback.

Enter Yukiga Futte Uresii, a noise project equal parts prolific and obscure, both to extremes. It reeks of digital bedroom space like nothing you’ve ever heard, and the bedroom in question has its shelves creaking under the weight of almost innumerable archival releases. This album, Chuusuu no Romero is ...Uresii’s 30th full-length release of 2021 and 407th since 2009. Give that a moment to sink in. Those numbers are already big enough to border on meaninglessness. Does Yukiga Futte Uresii’s presumed insistence on mass of output over individual quality have much impact on this release specifically? Well, uh, unsurprisingly enough, there are many, many points where Chuusuu no Romero falls victim to straightforward laziness, but at its best it has just enough going for it to challenge the necessity of an actively involved, meticulous curator. Some things simply don’t need the effort and input of a controlling human hand.

Let’s get the palette down: we’re looking at an anxiety-inducing computerised wasteland here. The album runs for just under an hour, over the course of which there is not one scrap of melody and no individual sequence of glitches is ever allowed to develop as a sustainable rhythm. It’s like a Gameboy killing itself over dial-up internet; sometimes it’s fascinatingly jumbled, sometimes it’s dull as sin. Middle track “Chuusuu no Naka” is the clearest example of the latter, a 5-minute non-event both homogenous and repetitive enough that I can practically visualise its makeup as a sparse set of loops, none of which amount to anything in particular. It’s a nothing-track, dangerous to the image of noise overhead because it coincides so perfectly with all its most banal qualities. A boring showcase of boring tones: delete.

The gargantuan sprawls either side are a different matter; ...Uresii opts for a glitch ethos on these, using each moment as an interruption to the one before and outright refusing to repeat anything throughout a song’s progression. These pieces aren’t just ‘unstructured’, they’re actively discontinuous, doubtless the product of algorithms that would wish only to put themselves out of their own misery were they ever brought to sentience. This doesn’t always lead to better things: final piece “Chuusuu no Kururu” is disappointingly subdued, stuck on the same dynamic wavelength and tones as “Chuusuu no Naka” even if its contents are more active in reinventing themselves. It’s ‘random’ in the sense of Theremin or turntable onanism, and scarcely more interesting.

However, the half-hour opener “Chuusuu no Romero” is easily the success story here. By far the most abrasive, chaotic and – above all – varied cut, it also makes the strongest impression. Its stream of digital noise is contorted, relentless and unpredictable enough to sound distinctly generative, yet there’s something so arresting in the dysfunctional interrelation of its layers and the abruptness of its shifts of intensity, particularly in the violence of its first few minutes, that at the very least it sounds like any generative content has been carefully curated. The piece is thoroughly, aggressively random, each detail desynchronised with the last with the exception of a few jarring rhythmic punctuations clearly designed to break the track up. It’s intricate without being nuanced, too chaotic, too mindlessly detailed to have come purely from the control and mediation of a practiced human creator, and there’s something deeply, impersonally cracked about this that scans as both intensely oppressive and oddly engaging. Is this valuable? It’s compelling enough that I can’t say no.

But not so fast! Does that make the album good beyond dysfunctional novelty? Uh. That’s a dirty loaded question and you should know better than to ask. What can, quite significantly, be said is that this music isn’t ‘useless’. Whether or not you find any personal value in a solid hour of antisocial computermelt, it’s easy to place it in a number of non-musical contexts. This is the kind of thing sound designers of various briefs would do well to clock on onto; don’t underestimate how hard decent interference soundscapes can be to come by. Sample it within your own music, use it to score your apocalyptic home movie, simulate a computer virus or just change it to your answer phone to flip people off. This is the kind of sound you could very conceivably make something out of, and the glint of its Creative Commons licence only seems to confirm this. It’s evocative and malleable and it wouldn’t be the same if there was just one breath of self-evident humanity in any of its garbled progressions. Intelligent design and self-evident effort do not always go hand in hand with creative potential, it would seem.

But does that amount to a good album? Not at all, but there’s more to be scavenged here than the thrill of hearing a digital workspace tear itself to pieces. Just don’t expect to come out of it any less burnt out than the musical vocabulary in question: Chuusuu no Romero concludes with a single persistent chiptune blip pitch-shifted up and down as though reason and inspiration alike have exhausted themselves. So too, in due course, does the blip, and in its wake a disconcertingly soothing silence invites all kinds of questions about whether to be frustrated or relieved, whether you’ll commit in advance to the next Yukiga Futte Uresii release and how necessary any of this was. Yeah. Don’t answer those.



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user ratings (4)
1.6
very poor


Comments:Add a Comment 
JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 14th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

yeah don't (or do): https://archive.org/details/TyuusuunoRomero

i heard/started writing on this two days after its release and since that time there's already been a new one. tentenko got nothing on this project

Digging: Teenage Jesus and the Jerks - Teenage Jesus and the Jerks

DadKungFu
August 14th 2021


1293 Comments


"reason and inspiration alike have exhausted themselves"

I'm starting to believe this. Maybe projects like this are the only thing that really relate to the world as it's becoming. It resonates with me in a fucked up way.

Gyromania
August 14th 2021


33122 Comments


More weeb shit?

MiloRuggles
Staff Reviewer
August 15th 2021


1579 Comments


Love your summation of the noise scene here. I notice a distinct lack of recs on the right hand side here. What are some releases that you think positively define the ethos of the genre?

sixdegrees
August 15th 2021


12250 Comments


OP has heard this and maybe Memebow

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 15th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

jam Government Alpha for noise that sounds like it was made by machines and I Am A Lake Of Burning Orchids for noise that sounds like it was made by humans

and six's 5s for the sound of ventilators in a covid ward

"Maybe projects like this are the only thing that really relate to the world as it's becoming."

give it another couple of decades and lyrical storytelling will have burnt itself out hard enough that this will be the only sound anyone relates to for like a month



GhandhiLion
August 15th 2021


13731 Comments


Jam government

Digging: Pedro Melo Alves - In Igma

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 15th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

don't worry about the government

porcupinetheater
Contributing Reviewer
August 16th 2021


8664 Comments


"Most people don’t listen to noise music, often for sound reasons."

lmao review coming out guns blazin

StormChaser
August 16th 2021


913 Comments


The album runs for just under an hour, over the course of which there is not one scrap of melody and no individual sequence of glitches is ever allowed to develop as a sustainable rhythm. It’s like a Gameboy killing itself over dial-up internet; sometimes it’s fascinatingly jumbled, sometimes it’s dull as sin.

this really made me wanna listen to this

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 16th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

Unsure whether sarcastic or not, but I've buyer beware'd as hard as I can. Make sure you make the right choice

sixdegrees
August 16th 2021


12250 Comments


Reviewer’s rating has already gone up by .1, it’s a grower for sure

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 16th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

don't speak too soon

Lasssie
August 16th 2021


1213 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5 | Sound Off

is this the kind of album to put on when trying to kiss a girl i have a crush on that sits beside me on my sofa? asking for a friend

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 16th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

lmao ily Lasssie

if you wanna prove she's one in a million, go for it

Lasssie
August 16th 2021


1213 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5 | Sound Off

That reminds me; dont you ever sing One In A Million by GnR to a girl

The lyrics are deemed outdated to some

In all seriousness i think the artwork on this is kinda dope so lowkey wanna check it oot

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 16th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

my goodness. "some". shivers.

and um okay go there! but when this inevitably disappoints you check one or all of these for qt artwork because they are all various degrees of good or better than good

https://www.sputnikmusic.com/soundoff.php?albumid=144624

https://www.sputnikmusic.com/review/83295/Lamp-Dream---%E3%82%86%E3%82%81-/

https://www.sputnikmusic.com/soundoff.php?albumid=343964

Lasssie
August 16th 2021


1213 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5 | Sound Off

will check fo sho

But where on earth do i find this album

It aint on youtube or spotify or am i just as dumb as i think i am

Uzumaki
August 16th 2021


3228 Comments


Soulseek?

JohnnyoftheWell
Staff Reviewer
August 16th 2021


41933 Comments

Album Rating: 2.4

oh sorry lol link in the first comment. all 404(?) of em are maybe there



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