Yon
order of violence


4.0
excellent

Review

by Mitchell D. W. CONTRIBUTOR (92 Reviews)
January 24th, 2021 | 36 replies


Release Date: 01/18/2021 | Tracklist

Review Summary: (Translation not required)

Solace in isolation is never guaranteed. Remoteness, especially when forced upon an individual, gradually excavates sinew out of a trembling foundation. There remains an innate human desire to socialize with others, or to at least be somewhat engaged with a confidant. Decomposed, subdued, and caged, a weary soul may render itself to dust in personal throes; the most resilient can endure trauma for only so long before its weight balloons to unfathomable heights. In this regard, Order of Violence is an exercise in discomfort—the mounting depths of despair that arise from seclusion, trapped in closing boundaries that strangle whatever light attempts to reach inside. For 36 minutes, German collective Yon scream at a wall of static as it enforces its will, closing off escape courses as a world once ripe with possibilities is limited in the narrowing scope of depression. Relationships collapse, opportunities enter a drought, and the greatest enemy to contend with is entrenched in the mind itself. The winding chronicles of the quintet’s proper full length debut barrel headfirst into defeatist rhetoric punctuated by confrontations with the concept of suicide. Jagged guitars, their discordant tones weaponized versus the listener, dominate the lion’s share of the tracks, while the ominous percussion lurks in the background. At times frantic and at others restrained, the drumming embodies a ceaseless funeral march, each beat echoing as another step in a wrong direction. Tucked behind a hazy production, Yon encapsulate the spirit of melancholic emo music expertly: performing from a distant abyss, removed from society while simultaneously decaying underneath its troubles and those of the individual themselves. All become internalized in a ball of vehemence that purveys violence as much as it does a touching atmosphere.

Where Yon excel amongst competitors is in their knack for more creative songwriting than the norm. It’s a common phenomenon for young screamo bands to adhere too closely to the lessons of Orchid, pledging to a no-brakes style without comprehending what allows such an approach to succeed. Brisk aggression requires more than pure speed to achieve higher quality; launching forward into each foray and not considering how to do so leads to a product that never permits individual tracks to distinguish themselves, with the result being a palpable impact of emotion, albeit one that feels like a repeat of classics. By inserting elements of post-rock, Yon operate with compelling crescendos in mind, allowing post-hardcore motifs to flourish alongside impactful climaxes. These tools, implemented correctly, separate songs from one another, making the overall LP much more enthralling for a listener—a level of unpredictability is introduced, and the spectrum of performances can portray the various extremes of emotional vulnerability. Consider the dichotomy struck by the eerie opener “Swxw” and the subsequent “Jungle,” with the former establishing a grim aesthetic that emerges from glitching electronics. In a flurry of percussion, the song begins, strained harsh vocals rising above a thunderous bass and crunching guitars. In only two minutes, the intensity increases steadily, culminating in anguishing screams that rage against the misty production that conceals them. Acting in opposition is the patient buildup of the latter formation, the drumming and bass slowly joining proceedings before a melodic tremolo bursts onto the scene. Rather than attack, “Jungle” eases on the tension, deconstructing the tune so it can accrue momentum once more, the bellowing rhythm section complimenting the budding guitar harmony. The band ultimately merges into a singular force: a spear of sonic precision culminating in dual manic vocal showcase and crushing heaviness. Both numbers are enjoyable, but how they accomplish their payoff varies, making for a much more satisfying runtime.

In many ways, Yon is a melting pot of what makes their chosen genre click. All of the key routes through which the emotion of emo can be displayed—evocative melodies, unbridled instrumental fury, slow-burner entries that settle before exploding—are amalgamated into a strong initial effort by the German gents, who remain open to multiple avenues of expression. That patented hostility leaps out at unsuspecting audiophiles in the fleeting “Avalanche,” all pretense dropped in favor of a total assault that highlights the power of the two vocal contributors, their desolate chords torn to shreds as razor-edged guitars rattle about the bleak environment. Inside the twisting post-hardcore riffs of “Chapter Chorister,” the strings adopt a sort of twang to them that accentuates the more core-centric parts, dissonance cooperating with an omnipresent bass to erect a fearsome menace. Balancing this is the elegant restraint practiced in prior outing “Sound of Shells.” Sounding as a Suis la Lune homage, the creation announces its arrival in gentle strumming, the vocal addition left at its most bare as it shouts out in vain, the calls sinking into the serene backdrop. At the behest of the drumming, the pace jumps to a midtempo gait, the overarching melodies coloring the setting. Rather then delving into vicious tendencies, “Sound of Shells” expires in a graceful meeting of harmonies, the tormented screams clashing with the delicate timbres that the group employs. Combining these variables into one beast reveals concluding track “Confronted by the Deity” and its comparatively imposing 8-minute lifespan. A steady drum beat accompanies a rising melody, after which the two guitarists align perfectly to strike a poignant line that buttresses the harsh vocals. Bounding from black metal-esque antagonism to the same glitching electronics that began the album, the tune immerses itself in the atmosphere of hopelessness that characterizes Order of Violence. Be it for captivating swells in sound or biting riffs, the ferocity of Yon’s emotion is consistently experienced.

Despite the musicianship on display, it’s possible that the intrepid set behind this record are somewhat pinned down by circumstance. In one dilemma, they present themselves almost entirely in their mother tongue, only sparsely including English utterances. In another, they have been absent for five years, a span that was utilized to craft the record that now calls 2021 its home. With life increasingly pushed into a realm that values instant gratification, rewards are few for those that cannot engineer a release cycle every two or three years. Compounding this reality with a language barrier—the market leans to familiarity over difference—and a general obscurity makes for a disc seemingly doomed to be misunderstood. Whether or not Order of Violence can be grasped in its cleanest form by appreciating its words, there’s no doubt that what Yon have amassed for their debut is a stunning example of what emo is still capable of in this new decade. It requires no subtext to analyze why the understated beauty of “Sound of Shells” can attach itself to an individual. Should a listener be so inclined, a brief visit to Google Translate outlines a detachment from a significant other as their communication disintegrates. Regardless of the reasoning, the relationship is drowning, and one’s dependable partner suddenly grows cold, silent, evaporating into a memory. However, German or English, known quantity or underground, the message that rings out necessitates no profound dissection. It can be heard in the pained shouts that struggle out of one’s throat. It can be heard in remorseful, nostalgia-infused melodies. Yon reside in the center of this ambiance of longing, relying upon their summative talents to speak universally, breaching through that static that closes in every second. Through this, Order of Violence is absolutely human, and by doing so, it is gorgeously discomforting.



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user ratings (35)
3.7
great


Comments:Add a Comment 
MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 24th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

First hit of the year. Maybe I'm overrating this, but I will always appreciate an emo album that tries to be more imaginative with its compositions.



Listen on bandcamp: https://yonyouth.bandcamp.com/album/order-of-violence



Also available on Spotify.



Jams and comments and whatever else all welcome. How goes the New Year for you?

Digging: Conway - If It Bleeds It Can Be Killed

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 24th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

The buildup in "Jungle" works so well for me right now

Million Ghosts
January 24th 2021


126 Comments


musically this is really cool, but the production is too clean and it makes the more chaotic moments sound sort of just bland and sterile. still pretty good, but i prefer this style a little dirtier and looser sounding

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 24th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

We had MillionDead and now Million Ghosts? I sense a trend...



And yeah, I can see that, but for me the haziness makes up for any issues there. It isn't too polished to a point where I'd find it unenjoyable.

madrigal30
January 24th 2021


1200 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

wow this is fkn awesome. it's got that wiry early-PHC production i love

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 24th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Yeah, I like how it sounds more stripped down than usual, very reminiscent of older days.

Dewinged
Staff Reviewer
January 25th 2021


23682 Comments


No matter how much I comb the dark threads of the internet, Mars always manages to surprise me with some band / release I've never seen, anywhere.

Well done my dear, you know emo is not my thing but I'll peek.

Digging: Lost Horizons - In Quiet Moments

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 25th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Thanks matey! I do my best to find the obscure stuff.



And this is worth checking, although I understand if emo isn't your scene.

Prancer
January 25th 2021


1216 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

good find. I like this

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 25th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Appreciate it mate, thanks for stopping by

SteakByrnes
January 25th 2021


22628 Comments


Ay nice you got the review out, sweet review man I'll give this a listen soon

Digging: Taeko Onuki - Sunshower

thrubeingcool86
January 25th 2021


3 Comments


No overhype! This album is fantastic and my AOTM at the moment. Solid work. Check out their label, got some superb artists on there.

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 25th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I'll definitely keep that in mind. This is the kind of screamo I want to see more of

Donchivo
January 25th 2021


1138 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Fuckin' awesome to see the Yon mates reverred here, props to that and to the review Mars!!



And yeah, the album twists and turns, budges and shreds,disturbs but sounds cohesive at the same time... coming a long way since their a lot more straight forward and post rock/post metal tinged 'You'-EP, which actually is pretty good too!



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MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 26th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I haven't followed them, this just sorta landed on my doorstep. Lucky find! Sweet to see that they evolved.

AxeToFall93
January 26th 2021


279 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Solid review, this sounds pretty good

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 26th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Thanks, glad you enjoyed it!

Uzumaki
January 27th 2021


2886 Comments


Ayyy, I was just wondering the other day when we’d be blessed with another Mars review to kick off 2021. Will czech soon; da, kamerade?

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
January 27th 2021


12654 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

It has been a tough task, admittedly. Nothing has really caught my ear thus far, but the search continues. This is head and shoulders above the crowd right now, definitely Album of the Month.

Nuchoking
January 28th 2021


30 Comments


Easily the most enjoyment I received from a release this year, cheers Mars always on point!



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