The Story So Far
Proper Dose


3.5
great

Review

by Kurikame USER (4 Reviews)
July 23rd, 2019 | 3 replies


Release Date: 2018 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Once you stop shouting at your ex, you may actually win her back.

When The Story So Far entered the scene in 2011 with their first LP, it took the kids by storm. Where other pop punk bands of the time liked to play with the mellower side of the genre, Under Soil and Dirt brought about the throwback to the fast-driven sound of the earlier days. The two records to follow would achieve similar success. I've always had one issue with The Story So Far – their predictability. Their music was a welcome addition to my playlists, but the similarity between songs made it tough for them to stay in my head or heart for long.

With Proper Dose, this finally changed.

Where one might expect another song about an unrequited love or a partner lost, the record opens straight up with a song about addiction and stagnation. Vocalist Parker Cannon refused to give interviews for a large time span starting in 2013, and when he decided to break his silence it was to talk about his abuse of pills and cough syrup. Watching the world grow whilst being stuck in isolation is the motif of the catchy, yet thoughtful opener, and the first few tracks to follow.

Take Me As You Please and Upside Down show a gentle vulnerability that is reminiscent of Clairvoyant, the sweet-sounding ballad of a previous EP. Their change in tempo, their break with what's been established on the album so far is exactly what I've missed in previous releases of the band.

Line is another experiment. An almost-instrumental track during which Cannon softly repeats minimal lyrics, it takes you away from the addiction for a moment. Everything seems fine and dandy again. Or maybe we've been tricked and pushed into a substance induced haze.

Light Year lets the album end in a similar vein to how it started. It wraps it all up nicely, reminds us of the topics touched upon, of how The Story So Far typically sounds. They're ready to go beyond now, but they're staying true to their roots.


With Proper Dose, the band has shown they're capable of variety; that they aren't going stale. Still, among the maturity and earnestness, one thing falls short: The lyrics. A record that lives from its vulnerability and heartaches would do very well to go deeper on personal experiences. Many lines seem to be there for the sole purpose of creating a rhyme. “I'm forcing myself to get better by fall - Will you be there if I fall?” is just one example of an unmastered craft. If The Story So Far manage to refine their texts, whilst keeping their playfulness shown here, a future release could very well be the emotive banger I've been waiting for. As it stands, Proper Dose is the album they should have released a few years ago to get that girl back they've been singing about on all those other songs.


user ratings (300)
Chart.
3.9
excellent
other reviews of this album
chris. (4.5)
It’s all good, it’s all love, now it’s over...

keza (4)
More than just a brutally honest exploration of addiction, TSSF's latest outing might be one of thei...

Blake498 (4.5)
TSSF present a cohesive, eclectic, and sincere album that showcases their growth as people and artis...


Comments:Add a Comment 
GhostB1rd
July 24th 2019


3509 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Who listens to lyrics?

ohtheurgency
July 25th 2019


113 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Definitely not op. "I'm forcing myself to get better by fall - Will you be there if I fall?" is not about creating a rhyme. It's more of a self-fulfilling prophecy. Anyways this is a neg from me. The lyrics are definitely the strongest point of the album combined with the instrumentals. Especially due to the personification and symbolism of drugs.

jawsher
July 26th 2019


28 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

how to miss the point of an album



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