Yellowcard
Southern Air


5.0
classic

Review

by Shamus248 USER (77 Reviews)
March 23rd, 2019 | 10 replies


Release Date: 2012 | Tracklist

Review Summary: I jumped, I fell, I hit the ground, but here I am alive.

It's hard to quantify how impactful Yellowcard's music has been on me, especially in a time of heightened emotions and uncertainty in my life. I'm 21 years old. I'm still a ways removed from any semblance of what life has in store. I'm still growing out of that youthful, innocent romanticism that occupied Ocean Avenue and even When You're Through Thinking, Say Yes. Those albums carried me through some heartbreak, but Southern Air has seen me through the beginning of my transition into adulthood. I'm starting to carve out a niche and an idea of where I want my life to go and I just entered a new relationship with someone I love, someone who reciprocates my affection and wants to walk on this journey with me. Of course, it's hard to foretell where it's going to go, but Southern Air has pointed me towards the vantage point I'm longing for.

There's something particularly special about the way Ryan Key begins the album with "Awakening." When he tells his nameless muse, "with the morning comes the rest of my life," you know he's serious this time. He may have poured his aching heart out on Ocean Avenue and even yearned for reconciliation on When You're Through Thinking, Say Yes, but this is a Ryan Key that has never been more content with where he stands. Having found love at this point in this life, he finds himself finally able to lift old burdens off his shoulders. What that was for me, the listener, was an extended olive branch, something I could emotionally latch on to. Knowing how quickly things can change and what personal implications they may foster is sometimes a truly gratifying experience.

Of course, the melancholy that precedes Southern Air still translates to writing material. Longineu Parsons' catchy drum fills support Ryan's "story full of restless nights" on "Surface of the Sun" and Sean Mackin's ever-beautifully done violin work carries "Here I Am Alive" through some incredibly introspective lyrics about not knowing yourself anymore and having the strength to come out the other end a better person. This is one of many moments on Southern Air I keep finding myself in, and it's helped me truly appreciate what a great songwriter Ryan Key is. "If I could write to the kid I was before, I'd tell him you'll get everything you ever wanted, but you will still want more," he sings as he reflects and ponders on the life he's lived to this point.

"Always Summer" is a celebration of the summery youthfulness Yellowcard is known for, with its ebullient instrumentals, upbeat guitar work, and Sean Mackin's incredible violin solo. But it's also a celebration of the personal growth Ryan Key pours out in the lyrical content. He extends thankfulness to a nameless companion for seeing him through the bad times and being there to see him blossom. "Here you are forgiving me again. You'll never know how real to me you've been," he sings. "This is a start, another empty page where I begin," he optimistically promises. "A Vicious Kind" is occupied by some of the best vocal work of Key's career, as he says goodbye to a former flame. "All I ever wanted was for us to beat the odds", he tells them. But he continues, "you can't buy forgiveness or blame me for the fall." One thing that stuck out on When You're Through Thinking, Say Yes was Key's eagerness to put the past behind him and that is fully realized on Southern Air.

"Telescope" sees Key turning his attention back to his new love. "You showed me strength in my skin," he thankfully proclaims. Ryan Mendez's great guitar work accompanies Sean Mackin's graceful violin work as Key optimistically nudges the listener. "Let's just keep driving on...let's go where we belong," he goes on. "Ten" is the late album acoustic ballad. For as emotionally heavy as the album has been up to this point, it arguably reaches its pinnacle here. Ryan Key calls out to a child he never had and expresses how happy their life together would have been. This is as solemn as Southern Air gets, however, as the album subsequently closes with its title track.

The imagery on here is particularly strong in its role of closing out the record. If "Back Home" the song that closed Ocean Avenue, was the early aftermath of Ryan Key's initial heartbreak, "Southern Air" is that boy all grown up, married and more at peace than ever before. "This will always be home", Ryan exclaims, taking in the atmosphere around him with a certain sense of gratitude. The violin-led instrumentals are strong as always, and this track captures the overarching positivity that engulfed most of the album leading up to this moment. "After living through these wild years, I'm coming out alive", Key continues, leaving the listener not just better equipped to tackle new challenges, but confident to pursue life with a strengthened sense of optimism and focus. On that note, Southern Air draws to a close.

This is easily among Yellowcard's best material. Of course, the angsty upstart that Ryan Key was is still there spiritually, but we now find our everyman not simply armed with a new lease on life, but thankful for where the bumpy road behind him has led. This record has been particularly helpful and impactful in my own life, as I finally begin to shed some of the shortcomings that come with youth and begin to claim some semblance of what life is and where it will take me. As I sit here, happy at last and renewed in my drive and determination, I find myself especially thankful to Southern Air for seeing me through it.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
Lucman
March 23rd 2019


2331 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

Best pop/punk record of the decade for me. Good review.

Digging: Glen Hansard - This Wild Willing

SowingSeason
Moderator
March 23rd 2019


30254 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

The pinnacle of the best pop-punk band of all time. Album means everything to me -- was there at the intersection of the best and worst times of my life.

Great review choice and even better writing.

Digging: Glen Hansard - This Wild Willing

joshieboy
March 23rd 2019


6522 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Album rules and this review rules. Awesome stuff.

Shamus248
March 23rd 2019


428 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Thank you guys, I really appreciate it. This is one of my favorite reviews I've written honestly haha

Digging: Get Scared - The Dead Days

LotionLord
March 23rd 2019


46 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Great review, great album.

Pnkr0cker
March 23rd 2019


1 Comments


Great review! Telescope is about Key's aunt that passed prior to this album's release, btw. Odds are, if you think a Yellowcard song is about a girl/lover, it probably isn't lol.

Shamus248
March 23rd 2019


428 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

I think most of YC's lyrics are open to interpretation though and that's why they're so great imo

Point1
March 23rd 2019


492 Comments


yeah like what does he truly mean when he says "there's a place off ocean avenue where I used to sit and talk with you"

Shamus248
March 24th 2019


428 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

I think you can dedicate ocean avenue to anything really. an ex, an old friend, whatever the case may be

QuinnObropta
March 25th 2019


134 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Good review, I agree with everything except I never really liked "Here I Am Alive"



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