The Moody Blues
On the Threshold of a Dream


4.5
superb

Review

by CaliggyJack USER (76 Reviews)
July 1st, 2017 | 7 replies


Release Date: 1969 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Moody Blues' 4th release continued the hot streak the band was on with no signs of stagnation, even if it doesn't match their previous two records.

After reaching the pinnacle of Proto-Prog Rock with their previous two records, The Moody Blues and Tony Clarke sat themselves down again to go full dive into Progressive Rock. On the Threshold of a Dream is exactly as it implies; an exploration into the edge of the human concept of "Dreams". This is evident in it's ethereal use of guitars and vocals, adding heavy echoes along with Symphonic Rock elements within the first half of the album. Lovely To See You contains heavy chorus and echos with Justin Hayward going absolutely bonkers on the Electric guitar, creating a beautiful Symphonic application to its dream concept.

Dear Diary utilized a softer tone, with Hayward and Mike Pinder's vocals being distorted through the mellotron and simple percussion base applying a deep, yet dark, tranquility to the track itself. Acoustic Guitars were really the main attraction of the record itself, with Send Me No Wine and Never Comes The Day both heavily relying on the instrument in their composition. Hayward's electric guitars were not forgotten however, as To Share Our Love and The Voyage both used the Electric Guitar extensively. The Voyage was an exceptionally complicated and nuanced piece, containing a myriad of instruments from keyboards, mellotron, and hammon organ; to electric guitars, cellos, and the piccolo. It is incredibly in-depth in its instrumentation, but it is paced out to give each section a chance to breathe before fading for another set to begin. It is by far one of the best songs on the album.

One minor criticism I have is that Graeme Edge's drums had taken a massive backseat in this record. Other than Dear Diary, Edge's drums were not given any time to shine at all, which is disappointing considering Edge's drumming ability was standout at the time. That, however, was not enough to take away from the sheer brilliance of the overall album itself. Tony Clarke showed once again that he was the premier producer of Moody Blues material. In On the Threshold of a Dream, Tony refines the complex sound that The Moody Blues had been perfecting over four albums, while still continuing his weird obsession with the mellotron. The key in Clarke himself was in how he only slightly changed the band's sound every album, this allowed the band to not drastically change and alienate its fanbase. It also, increased the commercial longevity of the band, as they would be able to make more albums that sound different and fresh.

On the Threshold of a Dream was a continuation of the dynamic sound that The Moody Blues had been pioneering for the three years before this record's release. Of course, the excellence of this album is overshadowed by the acclaim received for their previous two efforts. Still, one should not discount this album. It is beautiful, in both a commercial, and artistic way. It is simply another example of The Moody Blues finger on the pulse of Progressive Rock, a mantle they would hold until King Crimson would come to dethrone them.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
Batareziz
July 1st 2017


135 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Nice review, CaliggyJack. You plan to do their whole discography eventually or, at least, the Moodies' golden period up to "Seventh Sojourn"?

CaliggyJack
July 1st 2017


1790 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Somewhat. Originally I was gonna do a review of Days of Future Passed but Sowing's review is so fucking good it seems pointless as he pretty much describes the album perfectly. Same with Lost Chord, but I might still do I review of it because I disagree with the review's rating.

Divaman
July 1st 2017


1604 Comments


Wow! Nice to see this reviewed here. Have a pos.

Digging: Neil Cavanagh - City of the Sun, Valley of the Moon

Batareziz
July 1st 2017


135 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I see. Well, I for one am interested in your opinion on other albums. So keep up the good work, CaliggyJack.

CaliggyJack
July 1st 2017


1790 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thank you guys : )

TheSpaceMan
July 2nd 2017


9784 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Glad someone gave this words, I always wanted to but never felt like tackling it



Pos

e210013
July 6th 2017


1615 Comments


Caliggy. I'm sorry man but I was disconnected for sure. Your review completely escaped me. I don't know why, but this is a fact. But as usual we say, it's better late than never.

About the review: First, it's nice to see it reviewd here, finally. Second, this is one of their best albums, I think , and even more important, this is a conceptual album and God knows how I love conceptual albums. Third, despite I'm not properly an expert on Moody Blues, I can see that you made a good job with your review.

so, have a pos.



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