Horace Andy
Skylarking


4.0
excellent

Review

by butcherboy USER (123 Reviews)
March 18th, 2017 | 10 replies


Release Date: 1972 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Love and God and Mutiny

We all know the song, if not the man. 'Angel' off Massive Attack’s seminal "Mezzanine," an album that launched a genre, was how the bulk of his fandom outside his native Jamaica was established. That song still stands as a near-flawless piece of music; built around a dense plunging bassline, it rides two crescendos so steep you feel your spine jerk, and then fades into a single twitch of dub. But for all that aural perfection, 'Angel' rises and falls with its singer, his misaligned croon more bracing and beautiful than anything the music could have mustered just from the immaculate production. And long before his balmy voice lent nervy claustrophobic grace to "Blue Lines" and "Mezzanine", in Bristol and around the world, Horace Andy spent close to three decades as the patron throat of Jamaica’s bustling dancehall scene.

Love, God and Mutiny stand as the vanguards of rocksteady music, and when its iconoclasts weren’t singing panegyrics to Jah or women, what they formed were protest songs that derided neocolonialism and all it brought to the islands.

The end of the 19th century saw Jamaica’s economy be overhauled, turning it from a plantation-based agricultural island into a horn of ore. The discovery of Jamaica’s cache of bauxite, a mineral oxide of aluminum, happened as early as the 1800’s. However, it wasn’t until World War II caused the West’s supplies of aluminum to dwindle, that mining companies set up permanent camp in the Great Antilles. The demand for bauxite and the labour jobs it created in the West Indies, outstripped sugar as the main export from the region. As more and more people streamed to bauxite-rich areas of Jamaica to break back for no holding interest, sugar and agriculture industries died off, leaving the place entirely dependent on the mining company payroll. As the excavation of bauxite progressed, thousands of people were displaced from their homes, forcing farmers to abandon their tracts. What followed was a typical sequence, one of shaky economics triggering heavy political instability and renewed racial strife. A mass pilgrimage to the UK ensued, where rocksteady and dancehall eventually evolved into two-tone ska and early primitive dub, genres themselves informed by economic and socio-political woes.

This was the grim set that Horace Andy was born into in 1951 in Kingston. By the time he started cutting songs with famed Caribbean producers Phil Pratt and Coxsone Dodd in the late 60’s, Jamaica’s mercantile disenfranchisement was in full swing. There was plenty to be angry about, but for all its brutalized origins, rocksteady music and its later formation into contemporary reggae were always denoted by uplift and a danceable abandon.

There was a study published in the 80’s laying claim that as the number of coloured TV’s in Israel grew, so did the number of suicides. The rub was that as the basic quality of life of the average man increased, he no longer had to worry of hunger or shelter, causing his mental state to erode from cosmetic existentialist prostration. In less oblique terms, the more time you’ve got on your hands, the more time you’ve got to collapse into superficial problems and fret your way into an early grave. That anxiety bleeds into all aspects of life, informing art along the way. It is true that music coming out of countries addled by political and economic malaise, issues entirely more urgent than psychiatric detachment, seems to be infinitely more capable of optimism. For all its troubled roots, rocksteady music rejoices like no other.

"Skylarking" was recorded in 1972 by Dodd at his Studio One, where Andy’s cousin Justin Hinds had previously cut the iconic 'Carry Go Bring Home,' later to be covered by just about every Trojan and Blue Beat mainstay. The album barely cracks a half-hour, but in that short time-frame, it manages a lot.

The title track would become Andy’s breakthrough hit, and aside from his intermittent stints in Massive Attack, is the song he is most associated with. The term refers to the idleness and hooliganism that plagues the disaffected youths mired in slums and shantytowns, rooted in the titular bird’s tendency for playfulness that at times defies adaption and turns to risk. The track is well-worth its rep, swaying atop a lively bass that jitters along happily, so much so that it seems almost grotesque when set against the woozy melancholy of Andy’s vocal.

Elsewhere, doo-wop back singers and punchy brass prop up 'Mammie Blue' and 'Don’t Cry,' love songs that break up the album’s political lean. Opener 'Where Do the Children Play' sets an early tone for most of the songs found here, Andy’s voice taking turns between warbling purrs and plaintive shouts. These protest songs seem almost too dapper now, with short run-times, and airy production that lends the music a dream-like state; but the structure of these tunes, a trilling voice bouncing on a steady bass pattern and low clapping drums, would form the skeleton of what would later become dub music.

It’s difficult to pinpoint this album’s beauty and charm, and it will do little to appeal to those who don’t take to reggae or ska. Its lack of change in tuning or tempo might make it repetitive and monotone to some. But the complex set of history and geography that stand behind "Skylarking" isn’t the only thing that makes Horace Andy such an original or formative presence music. Today, reggae has mostly been relegated to a platitude, the fare of stoners or innocuous background music at get-togethers. Yet for all its surface placidity, these songs are ingeniously alive, opening up in your earphones and prickling your knees into a sway. It breathes and unknots into subtle electronic touches or barely-audible acoustic plucks. And that voice… well, sometimes beauty is a well-deserved end in itself.



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user ratings (9)
3.9
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
TwigTW
March 18th 2017


3827 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Listening to this now and it sounds great . . . Nice review, enjoyed the history, especially the part about the Israeli Tv study.

FullOfSounds
March 18th 2017


15775 Comments


Good stuff I gotta get into his albums since I'm a fan of his work in Massive Attack.

butcherboy
March 18th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Cheers, guys!

DoofusWainwright
March 18th 2017


19991 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Will check this (review and album)

TwigTW
March 18th 2017


3827 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Sad to say, I thought he was a woman on the Massive Attack album.

butcherboy
March 18th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

haha, yea his pitch has got an androgynous streak to it.. beauty nonetheless..

DoofusWainwright
March 18th 2017


19991 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Good album, a lot of lyric overlap with his vocal turns on Massive Attack albums too



Liked it, could even grow to a 4 or more, shame it looks really difficult to pick up a copy of this

DoofusWainwright
March 18th 2017


19991 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Does the anthology album have every song on this on it?

butcherboy
March 18th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

no, it doesn't.. and it's also bogged down by a mess of Motown covers that don't really translate too well to the rocksteady frame.. the greatest hits collection called Skylarking is maybe a better choice.. if not, dance hall style is his second album, it's got seven great tunes and is more widely available.

rabidfish
April 12th 2020


5977 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

some songs here are really haunting. Something about the production makes me feel kinda sad, melancholic and a little scared? Weird.

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