Entheos (USA)
The Infinite Nothing


4.5
superb

Review

by Chris Maitland USER (49 Reviews)
April 8th, 2016 | 20 replies


Release Date: 2016 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Behold 2016's first metal masterpiece

When deathcore titans Animosity broke up following the release of their 2007 masterpiece Animal, it seemed liked they would never create music together in any capacity ever again. So when it was announced in January 2015 that the 3/5 of the Animal-era lineup (drummer Navene Koperwies, bassist Evan Brewer, guitarist Frank Costa) were teaming up with Systems vocalist Chaney Crabb for a new progressive-tinged technical death metal band named Entheos, Animosity fans everywhere were overcome with shock and delight. Entheos' debut EP Primal, which was released last March, was a tad bit underwhelming considering the level of talent involved, but it showed some bursts of serious potential and proved that every member of the band was still at the top of their game musically. Thanks to the several months they took between finishing Primal and starting the recording process for their first full-length to tighten up their musical vision, Entheos has firmly found their footing on The Infinite Nothing, which is one of the most stunning and crushing debut extreme metal albums in recent history.

The songwriting approach employed on The Infinite Nothing is a pretty radical departure from the norm for tech death. While there's certainly a healthy amount of noodling leads and blast beats, Entheos is far more concerned with keeping the listeners on their toes with near-constant tempo shifts and bizarre experimentation than simply bowling them over with their immense technical ability. Perhaps the best indicator of Entheos' bold, no-holds-barred approach to the genre comes on the insane opening track "Perpetual Miscalculations". Within the first two minutes of the five-plus minute song, the listener is treated to an onslaught of sweet groove riffs from Costa, an eerie-synth interlude that sounds like it came out of an '80s horror movie and most notably, an entire section where one of Brewer's signature slap bass lines serves as the main riff. The best part about all of these constantly moving parts is that each one of them flows organically together and nothing ever sounds like its been shoehorned in just for the hell of it.

"Perpetual Miscalculations" is merely the start of the unrelenting chaos this album offers up in droves. Standout tracks "Mind Alone" and "New Light" regularly tow the line between tornado-esque mathcore, Perturbator-inspired electronica and prog-death metal opus while the blistering "An Ever-Expanding Human" is punctuated by a beautiful, sprawling outro solo that sounds like it was an outtake from The Faceless' Planetary Duality sessions. That feeling of never knowing what's coming next makes the entire album a relentless and enthralling adventure that never comes anywhere close to sounding stale or derivative.

The music may serve as the backbone for the bedlam of The Infinite Nothing, but Entheos' deadliest weapon is Crabb. For those who are unfamiliar with Crabb's previous work, she came up in the mathcore genre and her well-established comfort with constantly changing musical styles and tempos on a whim makes her the perfect choice to lead Entheos' frenzied attack. Her arsenal of screams that range from guttural lows to full-on shrieks allow her to effortlessly match whatever tempo the band is playing at any given moment without ever sounding uncomfortable or over-matched. It takes a vocalist with an exception amount of talent and versatility to not get overshadowed by the musicians in this absurdly technical style of music and Crabb is just that.

After a pretty disappointing start to 2016, The Infinite Nothing is the swift kick in the ass the metal scene needed right now. This is exactly the type of unpredictable and unrelenting assault on the senses I had hoped for from a band featuring three former members of Animosity and the vocalist of a highly underrated mathcore band. It'll be interesting to see if the band can continue to plug along at this level with new guitarist Malcolm Pugh (Costa was kicked out of the band shortly after The Infinite Nothing was recorded) in the fold, but for now I'll just sit back with a huge grin and appreciate how much joy listening to The Infinite Nothing brought me.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
cmaitland421
April 8th 2016


408 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

HELL YEAH FIRST METAL REVIEW I'VE WROTE IN FOREVER. Feedback and comments greatly appreciated as always.

Madbutcher3
April 8th 2016


2324 Comments


Pos'd. Good review, listening to the album atm, not normally a fan of this style but this is definitely better than most of the prog/tech death stuff like this.

Manqaness24
April 8th 2016


159 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I enjoy your writing style. I want to write up a couple of reviews for the site. Thanks for the information and i here is a positive.



Great album love Evan's bass lines here.

Essence
April 8th 2016


6277 Comments


if this is 2016's first "masterpiece" to you, then you probably haven't done enough listening...

cmaitland421
April 8th 2016


408 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

"if this is 2016's first "masterpiece" to you, then you probably haven't done enough listening..."



K. Thanks.



Essence
April 8th 2016


6277 Comments


you're welcome!

review is fine, though you have a typo in Perturbator's name. I'd also recommend staying away from hyperbole in your opening paragraph (the last sentence), and maybe shift it towards the end after you've said why you feel that way

cmaitland421
April 8th 2016


408 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks for the feedback. I just fixed the Perturbator typo.

ZippaThaRippa
April 8th 2016


10512 Comments


Jesus christ so djenty

ZippaThaRippa
April 8th 2016


10512 Comments


So far the best thing about this is still the cover

PrewDelisek
April 8th 2016


45 Comments


frank costa was not a part of this album.

ZippaThaRippa
April 8th 2016


10512 Comments


Unfortunately

Dmax28
April 8th 2016


546 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Great review, I saw them with The Contortionist and got the album a few days early. It has been growing on me. Just gets better with every listen. Can definitely agree the transitions on this are on point.

PortalofPerfection
April 9th 2016


1991 Comments


Uw uw. Ex-Animosity is half this band. Uw uw. Need!

Essence
April 11th 2016


6277 Comments


basically Portal, if this type of metal is already your thing, you'll love it, and if it's not, it'll be ok

BlueSwan
April 16th 2016


564 Comments


Snake will do it

MarsKid
Contributing Reviewer
April 19th 2016


8970 Comments


There's some good metal releases lurking in the underground if you look hard enough.

Wasn't impressed by their EP, but I think I'll give this a try.

TheWovenWeb
June 26th 2016


41 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

This is poop compared to most of the EP and Animosity

oltnabrick
June 30th 2016


36920 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5

^ are you serious? this is 2016's first metal masterpiece

Digging: Infectorem Slag and Granatus - Os Conquistadires Di Tridimensional Evolutivo

TheWovenWeb
July 4th 2016


41 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

i'm listening to neural damage with neural damage.....



this album is like slapbasscore

MillionDead
July 27th 2016


1072 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Not too impressed by this, unfortunately. I wanted to be, too. It's good, but I'm probably never listening to the whole thing again. Terminal Stages of Nostalgia is worth coming back to every once in a while, though.



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