Brian Eno
Music For Films


5.0
classic

Review

by MikeKeiper USER (3 Reviews)
August 7th, 2015 | 13 replies


Release Date: 1978 | Tracklist

Review Summary: An overlooked gem in Eno's large discography.

Brian Eno might be one of the greatest music mavericks of the last 100 years. The man has been apart of so many projects, ranging from pop and rock to ambient music. Simply put, the man has experience in many types of musical projects. Perhaps most interesting was towards the late 70s, when Eno pioneered what was to be known as ambient music. Starting with a collab with Robert Fripp of King Crimson fame in the early 70s, his association with ambient continued, somewhat unnoticed with his release "Discreet Music", a combination of original compositions and some older classics (Canon in D to be precise.) And in 1978, with the release of "Ambient 1: Music for Airports," it was viewed as a classic of the genre. But, in the same year, Eno also released "Music for Film," a collection of songs intended to be used in films. This release tends to go unnoticed, as it's overshadowed by the ambient series Eno is most known for. But, surprisingly, "Music for Films" contains some of Eno's most atmospheric, emotional, and strangely nostalgic songs, EVER.

Compared to his other releases, "Films" has a very warm sound to it. All the synthesizers have a rich, but not too overpowering bottom end, and range from long swelling pads, to electric piano sounds. But what really lets "Films" stand out above all other Eno ambient releases is the use of other instruments. Guitars string sections, bells, and the electric bass add a touch of raw instrumentation to the developing synthesizers, and the result is something magical. For one reason or another, the real instruments give "Films" a more nostalgic and positive sound. This is present on the opening track, 'Aragon.' While only a minute long, the bass and sliding acoustic guitar set the tone, which as mentioned previously, nostalgic and warm. This is a completely different take on Eno's ambient, as it normally gives off a more melancholic vibe (Ambient 2 and Ambient 4 come to mind.) The cold, vast atmospheric sound of later Eno records isn't present on this record for the most part. Don't get it confused, these are atmospheric pieces, but not in the same way as, for example, "Ambient 4: On Land." Rather than the sense of otherworldliness, these songs make you feel as though you're resting on a grassy hill, after a long day of playing in the summer heat, and watching the sun set ever so slowly. It's a very unique feeling, that is for the most part absent on most ambient releases nowadays. The three tracks, 'Sparrowfall 1, Sparrowfall 2, and Sparrowfall 3," fit perfectly with the feeling of a sun setting on a summer day.

Now, all of the tracks are good, but "From the Same hill," is simply put, masterful. The electric piano synth lead just melts as it fades in, and it meshes together perfectly with the acoustic guitar that comes on about 20 seconds in. It has just the right amount of reverb, and hearing the sliding of fingers up the guitar strings is calming and nostalgic all in one. As the song progresses, a string section, a lighter pad, and a quiet piano come into the song and the result is simply one of the most human, if not the most human song Eno has ever released. Hearing this song for the first time, it reminded me of when I was about 7, and after a long day at the beach, and taking a shower, I was sitting in my family's beach house, watching the sun slowly fade behind the water off the deck. It's one of the most moving experiences I've ever had from any song.

I could go on and on about the magic that is "Music for Films." But the only way to know for sure is to listen for yourself. Prepare yourself to be brought back- this is one nostalgic trip.


user ratings (102)
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3.6
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Comments:Add a Comment 
Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
August 6th 2015


15844 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

nice

Digging: Various Artists - Tokyo Mobile Music 1

BMDrummer
August 7th 2015


14081 Comments


my brother really likes this, we used a few songs in a video i think

PappyMason
August 7th 2015


5702 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

This is super review man, a great read.



I've been meaning to add this one to my Eno collection. 'Evening Star' is probably my favourite Eno ambient release so far.

Mort.
Contributing Reviewer
August 7th 2015


13357 Comments


Good review, posd

Been meaning to check out more eno for ages, only heard music for airports

Digging: Slint - Spiderland

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
August 7th 2015


15844 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

start from the beginning mort

Mort.
Contributing Reviewer
August 7th 2015


13357 Comments


Fuck you i wont do what you tell me!!!!

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
August 7th 2015


15844 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

considering you heard the weakest of Eno's first seven albums why should I even bother really

laughingman22
August 7th 2015


2776 Comments


eno's first three albums are masterpieces
his fully ambient stuff is groundbreaking but I find them so weak compared to his early pop perfections

Digging: Bjork - Utopia

altertide0
August 7th 2015


2991 Comments


The only problem with Discreet Music is side 2, and Ambient 1 is just wonderful.

If any of his 70's stuff is weak, it's Here Come the Warm Jets. Too much of a "I was in Roxy Music (but don't have the voice of Brian Ferry)" syndrome.

TwigTW
August 7th 2015


2856 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Always liked Sparrowfall I, II & III.

Digging: Exquirla - Para Quienes Aśn Viven

PunkMoon
August 8th 2015


228 Comments


Ole Sourpuss, Brian Eno.

PappyMason
June 1st 2016


5702 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Quartz melts me

PappyMason
July 30th 2016


5702 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Some of this is so beautiful. I really enjoy this album.



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