The Enid
The Seed and the Sower


5.0
classic

Review

by Aaron W. STAFF
February 19th, 2015 | 41 replies


Release Date: 1988 | Tracklist

Review Summary: It was the best of us...

1986: Troubled times once more came to be an acquaintance of The Enid – the band, despite the financial support of The Stand - the band’s fan club - and many others who greatly supported the band's endeavors, the band were bleeding money faster than Great Depression-era Wall Street. A novelty single released at this time was released and produced, quite literally, by hard times. Along with the monetary crisis the band faced, Robert John Godfrey and Stephen Stewart were at odds with how they wished to continue as musicians – the former wished to expand upon his musical career, branching toward as many genres as he could, while the latter wanted to devote his time to studio engineering. Therefore, the band's demise was set in motion – the seeds initially sown with solo projects, and this divide in their wishes it looked as if The Enid were once again done for, and this time it seemed for good.

Throughout 1987, the duo worked endlessly on their final effort, ”The Seed and the Sower”, loosely inspired by Laurens van der Post’s novel of the same name. With knowledge this would be the final album with Stewart, the duo greatly expanded the line-up, bringing in four new members to add to the duo’s sound. With this addition to the line-up, there were now less synthesized sections as there were in the past two albums, thanks in no part to the inclusion of uillean pipes, played by new member Troy Donockley. ”The Seed and the Sower” was the final phase of the growth of The Enid – gone were massively synthesized compositions, and in place were multi-layered, exotic pieces that seemed more “developed” and “natural” than before. Not only this, but it was mostly a return to the instrumental-only style of the first incarnation (with the exception of two tracks, ’Longhome’ and ’Earthborn’) – the band had come full circle.

Consisting of only five tracks, all of which are longer than seven minutes, this is one of the lengthier Enid albums. Track after track, the masterful compositions laid out by Godfrey and Stewart shine through – this album is quite unlike the others, an entire new beast. Tracks such as ’Chaldean Crossing’ heavily use percussion and vibrant guitar work as its selling point, including a motif that is spread throughout the fifty minute-long LP. ’A Bar of Shadow’ accommodates the uillean pipes greatly, adding a touch of texture to the track yet complimenting the oriental style of the track as well. ’Longhome’, the penultimate epic of the album, builds and builds as it goes on. This track is the absolute highlight of the band’s skill, and most possibly the apex of the second incarnation; Godfrey’s vocal and keyboard work, as well as Damian Risdon’s percussional chops, are top notch here. There’s not a misstep to be heard. The grand finale, a send-off of sorts to Stewart, as well as the farewell to the fans – ’Earthborn’, sung by the late Geraldine Connor, is an emotional, although calm, finale. The motif featured throughout the album has been leading up to this point, all for this one track that would signal the end of the band’s very existence. This not only showed the duo’s compositional prowess, but that even in the end, they could deliver a masterpiece to go out on. Godfrey retrospectively once said of the album: ”It was the best of us.”

After a tour and a two night stand at the Dominion Theater in November 1988, The Enid was effectively no more. Deceased. Inanimate. Kaput. Deceduto.

What was next"


After the breakup of The Enid, Godfrey pursued new musical endeavors of many kinds, from solo work to collaborating with young musicians in the U.K. electronic scene – the most notable of these experiments would be the next Enid incarnation, known as “Enid”. In 1989-90, the first release by this version of the new band would be a electro-dance remake of ’Salome’, backed with a remix entitled ’Salomee’. The future for Robert John Godfrey was uncertain, but with fresh blood and a new band, there was something to be done.

To be continued…"



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Comments:Add a Comment 
Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 18th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Band is dead - again.



The Enid was:



Robert John Godfrey - Keyboards/Vocals (on Longhome, backing on Earthborn)

Stephen Stewart - Guitars

Damian Risdon - Drums

Niall Feldman - Bass

Geraldine Connor - 'The Earth Mother' (Vocals on Earthborn)

Troy Donockley - Uillean Pipes



The Seed and the Sower: http://goo.gl/RdyW7P

Digging: Godley and Creme - L

SharkTooth
February 18th 2015


13963 Comments


Noice! Another Enid review!

BMDrummer
February 18th 2015


14480 Comments


hell yes

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 18th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Up next in The Enid discog - your choice



do I do a review on any of the live albums (to be honest, BM should try his hand on the Hammersmith albums)



the Fand remake



or the Come September stuff (vital to the next Enid album)

BMDrummer
February 18th 2015


14480 Comments


come september

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 18th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

not gonna lie, I may do some of the odds and ends to make sure I don't get rusty and to get them out of the way.



And this Incalus guy who's 5'ing the whole discog? Man, even I didn't do that with my old alts.

Veldin
February 18th 2015


3798 Comments


pos'd. I'm probably gonna jam this tonight.

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 18th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

enjoy it man



i remember when I had this and Something Wicked at 3-3.5s. Absolute proof that giving an album a chance is worth the investment.

SharkTooth
February 18th 2015


13963 Comments


"Objectivity 40%"
I was expecting Incalus's to be a lot lower considering the discog 5'ing he's doing

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 18th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

I'm not complaining one bit.

Friday13th
February 18th 2015


6670 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

expecting this to rule

Digging: Darkwater - Human

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 18th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

If you're into emotional tour-de-forces, you're in for a ride bud.

menawati
February 19th 2015


16587 Comments


nice review frip

RunOfTheMill
February 19th 2015


3943 Comments


Not everytime that you see a band actually give it their all for a final album! Nor do you hear of many good prog albums coming out of the late '80s!

Pos'd

TheSonomaDude
February 19th 2015


6748 Comments


If these guys are from Enid, Oklahoma, I will flip my shit and jam this instantly.

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 19th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

they're very british

























jam it instantly though

MrSirLordGentleman
February 19th 2015


12359 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

First song is probably my favorite in here, pretty different from what I expected from an Enid album

TheSonomaDude
February 19th 2015


6748 Comments


No prog from Oklahoma? Awww darn
I guess I'll stick to Flaming Lips...

Friday13th
February 19th 2015


6670 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

YOSHIMI THEY DON'T BELIEVE MEEE

nah do both like me

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
February 19th 2015


18541 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

jam the debut sonoma, i can hook you up with a link so you get the right version (since there's an 80s remake as well as the original)



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