Sadistik and Kid Called Computer
The Art of Dying


4.5
superb

Review

by ComeToDaddy USER (48 Reviews)
August 19th, 2014 | 11 replies


Release Date: 2010 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Foster finds his stride, alongside more consistent production in a more concise package

While Sadistik’s 2008 release The Balancing Act was an impressive debut, there were a handful of issues that held it back from being something really great. The number of different producers lent the album some variety, but with that variety came inconsistency. A major drawing point for the album was Emancipator supplying some of the beats, and while his tunes are undoubtedly gorgeous on their own, they aren’t ideal as a backing track for such an aggressively intimate hip-hop record. Tracks featuring Emancipator often split the listeners’ attention between the calming trip-hop and the aggressive verses Foster spits, which ultimately detracted from the albums replay value. With his sophomore release, Cody Foster (aka ‘Sadistik’) amends these missteps, working strictly alongside Toriano Terrell (aka ‘A Kid Called Computer’) to create a concise ep that approaches the limits of Foster’s extremely personal brand of hip-hop.

” Dying is an art, like everything else. I do it exceptionally well. I do it so it feels like hell. I do it so it feels real.”

Opening this EP is an extended introduction, backed by a monotonous Sylvia Plath extract. Anyone familiar with Sylvia Plath’s works (even those unfamiliar with poetry may recognise allusions to her from albums like Antler’s ‘Hospice’) will immediately understand the lyrical direction intended for The Art of Dying. The 6 tracks found here are intensely emotional and intimate, with Foster spewing his misgivings and regrets across an instrumental skeleton perfectly suited to his delivery. From tense strings runs accompanying an intrusive ride cymbal and aggressive lyrical content (‘Black Rose’), to a cloudy synth-heavy mix backing his more downhearted passages (‘Ghost in the Machine’), the emotions conveyed to the listener range from depressed to furious, and often switch between these several times within one song. The producer clearly worked very closely with Sadistik to develop beats that would enhance the purpose of each section of the album, and communicate confusion and suffering to the listener as effectively as possible.

All of the tricks found in Foster’s debut make their return on this album, but this time he eases them into the tracks with far more finesse than before. The rapid-fire assonance found in ‘Absolution’ makes a return in ‘Save Yourself’, but isn’t nearly as jarring as it was in his previous release, where he completely changed his flows pace to make it sound more impressive and thus detracted from the listening experience. Similarly, the most aggressive track to be found here, ‘Black Rose’, is a very mature step forward from the worst track on his debut, ‘Writes of Passage’, which was so out of place that it could warrant a skip. In this release, each song contributes to the next, and benefits from the song before it, constructing a far more coherent piece of music and perfectly depicting the emotional ups and downs associated with the end of a relationship.

The very specific lyrical content and personable delivery style means this album isn’t for everyone. While issues like whiny delivery and bloated run time from some of his other releases aren’t present here, it also doesn’t have the topical diversity that Flowers for my Father does, which had whole tracks dedicated to covering facets of drug use, loss of a parent and dealing with your own imperfections. Here are 6 tracks wholly focused on relationships, and this means that if the listener can’t appreciate this extremely emotional portrayal of a disastrous end of 2 people’s commitment to each other, then they likely won’t enjoy the EP. Foster holds nothing back, revealing himself to the listener and rarely giving them time to breathe or reflect. His flow borders on suffocating, and while Terrell’s production and several spoken-word sections go a long way to alleviating this, it still somewhat limits the audience for this EP.

This is a single, unified reflection of Sadistik’s mental turmoil. It can be depressing, enraging, ugly, but above all, it is honest and intimate. Those who enjoyed his other releases may not find as much to love here, but those that do may fill a hole in their music library that they didn’t know existed. This is one of the most personal hip-hop records ever laid down, Foster’s most consistent release from front to back, and contains what is arguably Foster’s best single song in ‘Ghost in the Machine’. The Art of Dying is 34 minutes of unfiltered emotion, a classic in the niche of emotional hip-hop and the height of Sadistik’s career to date.



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user ratings (57)
4.3
superb


Comments:Add a Comment 
ComeToDaddy
August 19th 2014


1828 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

This is sitting around a 4.8, I really wanted to make this a 5 review but it's just shy of that. Anyway, first time reviewing an EP, constructive criticism is welcomed and appreciated!

ComeToDaddy
August 19th 2014


1828 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Also, on Sadistik's artist page, clicking on 'Sadistik & Kid Called Computer' just redirects it back to the main artist page, so you never get to this album. That probably needs fixing, by either getting this album moved across to the main artist page or fixing the redirection. Hopefully a staff member notices this, the album deserves some attention

ComeToDaddy
August 19th 2014


1828 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Figured I'd follow up after I reviewed Ultraviolet, while he still has some attention on the site. It's too good to not be reviewed

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
August 19th 2014


32292 Comments



Also, on Sadistik's artist page, clicking on 'Sadistik & Kid Called Computer' just redirects it back to the main artist page, so you never get to this album. That probably needs fixing, by either getting this album moved across to the main artist page or fixing the redirection. Hopefully a staff member notices this, the album deserves some attention


The staff aren't capable of fixing things like this, this is where you come in by reporting such problems in the meds thread. Except this is something that you can do yourself, because nothing needs to be moved. Just go to the artist page, click on "edit band information" and replace the buggy similar artist entry

ComeToDaddy
August 19th 2014


1828 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

I did exactly that, but it still redirects back to the original artist page. I'll report it in the meds thread for safe measure, thanks Deviant

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
August 19th 2014


32292 Comments


I've already sorted it for you. It was the ampersand in this title, the site just redirected back to the page you were already on. Just for future reference, always use "and" in place of "&". This site just doesn't cope well with certain symbols

ComeToDaddy
August 19th 2014


1828 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Oh, thanks a heap! The similar artist was already there, I simply noticed it because I submitted this review, but I'll remember that if I run across a similar problem in the future

cryptside
August 19th 2014


2399 Comments


Nice work here, man. Can't wait to check this out.

ComeToDaddy
August 19th 2014


1828 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks for that, you've been on a golden reviewing streak lately yourself! Hope you enjoy it when you get a chance to listen

TomArnoldsArmpit
August 19th 2014


3081 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

very nice, album is keen

Butkuiss
May 30th 2015


4689 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

this is actually v good.



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