Weezer
Everything Will Be Alright in the End


4.0
excellent

Review

by Adam Thomas EMERITUS
October 7th, 2014 | 818 replies


Release Date: 10/07/2014 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Weezer return to form by doing what they've always done.

Look, folks. I think it's high time we – as in you, me, and just about everyone except for the nice people at your local payola “alternative” rock radio station who continued, and rightfully so, to push Weezer's singles long after the point where the entire internet music community turned on Rivers and company in a tsunami of post-Pinkerton mudslinging – collectively apologized to Weezer. I get it. This is what happens when we allow ourselves to get lost in nostalgia. Yes, Weezer's Blue Album and Pinkerton so wonderfully encapsulate that golden age of teenage awkwardness that we all must go through to become semi-functional adults, but let's not forget that what made those records so endearing to so many is that Rivers stumbled through their themes just like the rest of us. It's not like he was some paragon of poetic contextualization and prose on the underlying angst of a kid who couldn't get laid. In fact, he was the embodiment of every single reason that a goofy kid with thick glasses and an unhealthy infatuation with KISS would find himself awash in sexual frustration. If anything, Weezer's latter day output cements this as fact. The only thing that has changed over time is that his success has found him in new situations to manifest his awkward teenage poetry. His notable clumsiness over the last decade, especially on Raditude and The Red Album, wasn't some pop-branding marketing shtick. It was the exact same ham-fisted lyricism that brought us “Falling For You”, but now coming from a middle aged man who just wanted to indulge in the available excesses of his fame.

Our collective sense that Weezer has somehow wronged us, by doing what they have more or less always done, is the driving force behind Everything Will Be Alright In The End. Even its opening audio clip of a child waking up from a nightmare only exists to act like a “lol jk” text to their fans after the last decade of their career, and while there are certainly moments on Everything Will Be Alright In The End that indeed make some call it a comeback, it doesn't change the fact there are songs on even Weezer's most loathed records that live up to the same mark that they've approached here; “The Greatest Man That Ever Lived (Variations on a Shaker Hymn)”, “Put Me Back Together”, “Unspoken”, and even “Pork and Beans” which tackles many of the same themes of growing older and finding yourself that Rivers uses here to great success on “Eulogy for a Rock Band”. Still, what makes Everything Will Be Alright In The End work as a “return to form” kind of record, is it is the first time since “Hash Pipe” ruled the radio airwaves where the band actually rocks. It's a whimsical soundscape of 90's fuzz and the cheesy late 70's arena rock guitar harmonies that made Weezer both so cool and horribly uncool at the start of their career. All one has to do is look at the writing credits to see how the guitars are undeniably what the band thought separates the public's opinion on what is good Weezer and what is bad Weezer. “Foolish Father” and “I've Had It Up to Here” carry co-credits by Patrick Stickles of Titus Andronicus and Justin Hawkins of The Darkness respectively, and it is their indulgent attitude towards big guitars that make those songs stand out. Even the final trio of songs channel prog-pop group Fang Island in their completely ridiculous construction of solos on top of solos, but in that hokey self-gratification lies something that indeed makes everything alright: it's really fucking fun. And to be fair, that's all that matters. Lets face it. Rivers' lyrics are just as bad as they've always been, the band's sense of pop-song structure is still the backbone of every track, but that doesn't matter when everyone is having fun.



Recent reviews by this author
Sleater-Kinney No Cities to LoveAt the Gates At War with Reality
YOB Clearing The Path To AscendUnited Nations The Next Four Years
Matter TeraphimThe Hotelier Home, Like NoPlace Is There
user ratings (888)
Chart.
3.8
excellent
other reviews of this album
1 of

Comments:Add a Comment 
theacademy
Staff Reviewer
October 7th 2014


30456 Comments


haha nice

*immediately scours adam thomas ratings to see what he rated other weezer albums*

beachdude
Contributing Reviewer
October 7th 2014


836 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Pretty accurate tbh, although I enjoyed this a lot. Prepare for a shitstorm though.

Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
October 7th 2014


24122 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

sweet

Greenpaw
October 7th 2014


223 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I kinda want to bump this up to a 4.5.

Atari
Staff Reviewer
October 7th 2014


22380 Comments


dat first sentence. really great review

Digging: Have Mercy - Make The Best Of It

mryrtmrnfoxxxy
October 7th 2014


14695 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5 | Sound Off

pretty good

Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
October 7th 2014


24122 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

only thing is they havent really done anything like the futurescope trilogy before

MyRamona
October 7th 2014


1098 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5 | Sound Off

I love this review, it's as uplifting as this record.

scottpilgrim10
October 7th 2014


4748 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

“The Greatest Man That Ever Lived (Variations on a Shaker Hymn)”, “Put Me Back Together”, “Unspoken”



Fantastic choices, and nice review

Athom
Emeritus
October 7th 2014


17241 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

The guitar work has all been in past Weezer records. Not to the kind of super indulgent extreme that it is in the Futurescape songs, but the guitar work is instantly recognizable as Weezer and recalls solos and leads on their earlier work.

MyRamona
October 7th 2014


1098 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5 | Sound Off

A lot of thought has gone into the guitar work on this album. Tone and tech.

BMDrummer
October 7th 2014


13840 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5 | Sound Off

gonna check this today m/

Athom
Emeritus
October 7th 2014


17241 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Yet the hooks are similar/the same. River's biggest writing asset is his knack for melody. How those melodies are embellished and fleshed out changes a little bit from album to album, but that framework is rather static.

MyRamona
October 7th 2014


1098 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5 | Sound Off

He's got a very good way of expressing the same hook and making it different, reiterating or whatever. Whether it be contextual change or just the use of different instruments, vocals and guitar mainly. I have a serious boner for the way this record has been written.

BMDrummer
October 7th 2014


13840 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5 | Sound Off

wow first track was actually really good

JohnnyOnTheSpot
Staff Reviewer
October 7th 2014


5960 Comments


enjoying this even if it's the same old

AmericanFlagAsh
October 7th 2014


8021 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Rivers' voice bugged me in some places

Digging: Gas - Narkopop

Wadlez
October 7th 2014


4891 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

First two tracks are atrocious. Enjoying some of the rest though.

klap
Staff Reviewer
October 7th 2014


11581 Comments

Album Rating: 3.4

whoa weezer coaxed two whole paragraphs out of you adam? i do need to listen to this

Athom
Emeritus
October 7th 2014


17241 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I love you too, Rudy.



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2016 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy