Nile
Black Seeds of Vengeance


3.5
great

Review

by Jacquibim CONTRIBUTOR (80 Reviews)
September 25th, 2012 | 22 replies


Release Date: 2000 | Tracklist

Review Summary: An imperfect but critical release for these now death metal giants.

With a name that resonates distinctly within the technical death metal scene, few bands can claim to have a more recognisable signature sound than Nile. Renowned for evoking images of horror via an otherworldly wall of noise, Nile’s position among the most revered tech-death acts today is as undisputable as their influences are unconventional and their music is unmistakable. Pin-pointing the essential Nile album is surprisingly difficult. Due to their obvious quality, In Their Darkened Shrines or Annihilation of The Wicked are commonly cited as such. However, these two albums weren’t necessarily revolutionary or ground breaking in any sense, being the products of a formula that’s still being methodically refined and polished today. So if somebody were to ask me what the “essential” Nile release was, I’d tell them to look no further than Black Seeds of Vengeance.

Although there was still much to come from the band at the turn of the new millennium, Black Seeds of Vengeance represented Nile’s transition from a deathgrind band with a number of Egyptian nuances, to a fully-fledged Egyptian-themed technical death metal band. On their 2000 release, Nile took the Egyptian nuances of Catacombs and blended them seamlessly with the technical fury that would go on to characterise their sound. The album begins largely in the same way as their debut, with an Egyptian-themed acoustic build-up, before catching you off guard by a barrage of brutality. However, unlike your typical death metal release, it becomes obvious that these guys aren’t just focussed on sheer brutality. There’s a hefty amount of middle-eastern melody to be found here, not in the form of interludes but in the guitar-work itself. This dedication to all things Ancient-Egyptian is exemplified by a number of Egyptian accents, including but not limited to an array of exotic acoustic and brass instruments, and even a gong.

By the time you arrive at the amusing named “Masturbating The War God”, a pattern begins to emerge with regard to the song writing. A good portion of the songs follow a linear pathway, building to a climax in the middle before the intensity subsides thereafter. Nevertheless, despite the sometimes predictable nature of the record, the instrumentation and, more specifically, production make up for it. Though it may sacrifice a touch of clarity, Black Seeds of Vengeance sounds properly brutal. The riffs that can be deciphered are air-tight in their execution, with complex, syncopated rhythms as well as slow, lingering chords which provide a base which the Egyptian acoustics build upon. The audibility of individual notes as well as the lyrics does suffer as a result, but it works in creating an eerie and thoroughly unsettling atmosphere, exhibited best in the 9-minute “To Dream of Ur”. This type of song would go on to become a mainstay in Nile’s future releases, which is but another reason for why Black Seeds of Vengeance – containing the first signature Nile “epic” – could be considered Nile’s essential album.

No, Black Seeds of Vengeance isn’t Nile’s magnum opus, but the path it set for the rest of their albums to follow was critical to Nile’s success as a band. By blending two seemingly incompatible styles of music from entirely different cultures, these guys took an atypical concept and made it work, and it’s still paying dividends twelve years later.



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As the album that would help define Nile's sound in subsequent years, Black Seeds of Vengeance is an...


Comments:Add a Comment 
Jacquibim
Contributing Reviewer
September 25th 2012


16831 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Why on Earth didn't this have a review yet?

KILL
September 25th 2012


74072 Comments


cos its not that gd or interesting maybe

Jacquibim
Contributing Reviewer
September 25th 2012


16831 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Perhaps KILL, perhaps.

MO
September 25th 2012


19726 Comments


their song titles always give me a larf

ViperAces
September 25th 2012


12524 Comments


Are these more like Technical DM or Melodic DM?

TBliss2
September 25th 2012


508 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

album rules

YUJOS
September 25th 2012


978 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Album rules 2!

Digging: Ghost B.C. - Infestissumam

Curse.
September 25th 2012


8037 Comments


Every song title looks like it should be a dethklok song

YUJOS
September 25th 2012


978 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Hello Sonic!!

ViperAces
September 25th 2012


12524 Comments


So they sound like Death?

YUJOS
September 25th 2012


978 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Viper Ace check: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJERkL8Qmyg, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_p7saPx6NnU

linguist2011
Contributing Reviewer
September 25th 2012


2163 Comments


Yeah this album really deserves a review to be honest, so for that alone, I'll pos. The album itself is part of Nile maturing and expanding their sound into greater lengths, and more complex song structures. I figure that this album is really their most underrated one.

Digging: Moondog - Moondog

YUJOS
September 25th 2012


978 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Back in the day Linguist it wasn't underated. Maybe cause they've put better albums after Blacks Seeds and people tend to give more attention to Annihilation Of The Wicked and In Their Darkened Shrines, then yes you can call it underrated.

jayfatha
September 25th 2012


2882 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Not one of my favorites from Nile but I think I remember there being a few really good tracks

Donchivo
September 17th 2013


494 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

nice review, but I completely disagreewith one Statement:



"...from a deathgrind band with a few Egyptian-sounding melodic interludes thrown into their debut, to a fully-fledged Egyptian-themed technical death metal quartet."



Its the other way round! The debut is the album where middle eastern music is mostly inertwined into the music while on latter albums its only to be found in interludes. Listen to the break in "opening of the mouth" or the horns in "ramses bringer of war", which song on say AOTW has actual middle eastern folklore influences. One reason why there debut is the best nile IMO. It's the most crazy album they have ever done, thou of course later they got more complex and technical, but less original.

Digging: The Cracow Klezmer Band - Sanatorium: Under The Sign of The Hour Glass

Jacquibim
Contributing Reviewer
September 17th 2013


16831 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Thanks for the comment, and that's an interesting take on their sound. But I actually found a lot of

the guitar melodies themselves on later albums to have Egyptian vibes to them, thus the aesthetic was

achieved without tacking on gimmicks.



I obviously should've explained that better, but this was only my 3rd review I think. I might re-write

it.

Donchivo
September 17th 2013


494 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

yeah, I agree that they have a middle eastern vibe in their later works too (btw I love ITDS and AOTW) but it's still more typical death metal stuff than on catacombs imo.



One reason for that is George Kollias, while he is a beast of a drummer he is playing less feeling oriented and unconventional than Pete Hammoura and Tony Laureano but relies more on technicality and speed. The others sounded a lot more otherworldly, and thus added spice to the special Nile atmosphere imo.

DikkoZinner
May 14th 2014


4125 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Yep, "Defiling the Gates of Ishtar", good tune.

Fozzie
July 26th 2014


425 Comments


Gimmick band.

Lets see... Retarded song structures, awful production, horrendous vocals, and monotonous drumming. Everything blends into each other and not in a good way. How many ridiculous Egyptian interludes do you need in a song?

This album has no redeeming qualities. This is garbage.


TheNotrap
February 28th 2015


8300 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Great jam.

Digging: Kronos - Arisen New Era



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