Delroy Edwards
Teenage Tapes


4.0
excellent

Review

by MisterTornado CONTRIBUTOR (47 Reviews)
March 15th, 2014 | 13 replies | 1,337 views


Release Date: 03/03/2014 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Fade into the unknown

As EDM continues to occupy a comfortable sector of the mainstream with its overtly melodic, imitation aggressive qualities and bombastic elasticity, a number of underground producers are taking the skeleton of electronic music and shifting it upside down to eerie, subterranean, and bizarre new levels. Highlighting these ghastly low lit electro chambers are the likes of Emptyset, Deadbeat, Silent Servant, Prurient, Lee Gamble, Ron Morelli, and Container who, while each existing within their own distinct sound worlds, bury their demonic play on 4/4 in immersive shades of dark with a heavy emphasis of space and atmosphere. Amongst these sonic underlords is Delroy Edwards who weaves obsolete technology, a minimal recording style, psychotic noise bursts, and a foreboding mask of uncertainty around his debut, Teenage Tapes, to a point where his music doesn’t restrain itself to any single mood, template, or fashion of electronic music.

The sonic ambiguity surrounding Teenage Tapes naturally spills over to the tracklist, featuring eight cuts anonymously filed A1, A2, A3, etc. The penetrative buzzing of power lines immediately fills ear buds on the opener ‘A1’ as it sustains a cold and rhythmless drone throughout its duration, foreshadowing the chaotic noise to come. Before long Edwards’ transports the listener to an eerie and static woven industrial zone on ‘A2’ that evokes imagery of the dense and smokey concrete landscapes of Terminator 2 as it tunnels through the T-800’s oversaturated red viewpoint, vigorously hunting out its next victim. Following judgment day, ‘A3’ continues the hunt down with grimy Casio looped rhythms and sneering villainous synth chords that provoke further incidental pictures, such as roaming the dark and desolate halls of DOOM while helplessly remaining moments away from certain death.

Side B of Teenage Tapes begins by extracting any hint of subdued insanity on Side A and, quite literally, crushes it within a vacuuming onslaught of hysterical harsh noise as Edwards himself can occasionally be heard screaming through the intense walls of static. Compared to the rest of the record’s desolate, crippled, and unconvential interludes (A1, A4, B3) ‘B1’ is, perhaps on purpose, too jaded and blatant of an expression on a record that’s soul is so rooted within the hidden and obscured realms of memory and consciousness. Following the assault is the crude acidic funk of ‘B2’ which is, consequently, a purely rhythmic exercise as the heat of ‘B1’ strips Edwards of his dystopian atmosphere. Edwards chooses to close out Teenage Tapes at his most relaxed and delicate on ‘B4’, effortlessly channeling warm lo-fi grooves alongside a series of reflective drones that bring back personal memories that are as faint and subtle as playing Super Hang-On on Sega Genesis many years ago. Although instead of this memory being a first person experience of the game, I’m a figureless entity watching a former shadow of myself from a distance; lost and aching within the obscurities of memory.

Whether or not the subdued and treacherous angles being explored by Delroy Edwards and a number of other similarly focused producers can be heard as a larger comment of distrust and disapproval of the current hygienic bombast of electronic dance music would be difficult to say. Perhaps it’s a mixture of this ideal alongside the fruition of their own head space and awareness of the world around them. In a musical landscape that currently thrives on cleanliness, purity, exaggeration, and momentarily pleasing electronic music, it’s refreshing to see a producer like Delroy Edwards tapping into the cerebral qualities of electronic music. By threading his sounds through obsolete technology and giving his recordings distance and space tangled within a stunning sense of atmosphere, Teenage Tapes continually makes for a listening experience that’s simultaneously danceable, foreboding, nostalgic, and thought-provoking.



Recent reviews by this author
ECO VIRTUAL ATMOSPHERES 第2Oneohtrix Point Never Commissions I
Echo Lane Afterschool Inc. bikes clouds cranes phonesTaku Sugimoto Quartet / Octet
White Suns TotemAnne Guthrie Codiaeum variegatum
user ratings (5)
Chart.
3.9
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 15th 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

'A3' - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffGCq9MlqsU

'B4' - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfKM6q1IOq4

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
March 15th 2014



30859 Comments


Thought this was really underwhelming

Digging: Calyx and Teebee - FabricLive.76

MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 15th 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Depends on your willingness to accept the lack of fidelity here opposed to his previous work, which for me is far more evocative than any of the EPs (which strictly operated in the organic elements of house).

MrSirLordGentleman
March 15th 2014



4004 Comments


what's up with these homemade artworks that are on almost evey new underground album?

KILL
March 15th 2014



70298 Comments


cheap and seaeric's dig em

Digging: Gal Costa - Gal Costa

CaptainDooRight
March 15th 2014



28297 Comments


look at that recs list. Bookmarked

Digging: IQ - The Road of Bones

CaptainDooRight
March 15th 2014



28297 Comments


Listened to both tracks. Thanks for linking btw. I really really like this. And not sure if anyone's noticed but that first track you linked is pretty much no different than black metal. And if you like, then chances are you probably like at least 'some' bm out there. Second track was awesome too. It has a vintage feel. Great stuff. I think I'm gonna pick this up.

oltnabrick
March 15th 2014



30034 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

vibes


MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 15th 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

And not sure if anyone's noticed but that first track you linked is pretty much no different than black metal.

Definitely hear that, if it were chopped & screwed a bit. And yeah I get around to some bm occasionally - see my Paysage d'Hiver review. I was planning on picking it up too, but the cheap Boomkat vinyl already sold out so I'm left with waiting for a cheap discogs upload.



CaptainDooRight
March 15th 2014



28297 Comments


Yeah I was the 4th post on that rev. Prolly my fav by you. I feel your pain. Rock box torrents prolly has the full discog but I know you don't torrent. S/T is really good too. I don't bm as much as I used to. Mainly because the genre is so stale but I do have my favorites. All my current needs are satisfied through tha realmz of electronikz

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
March 15th 2014



30859 Comments



Depends on your willingness to accept the lack of fidelity here opposed to his previous work, which for me is far more evocative than any of the EPs (which strictly operated in the organic elements of house).


It's not the almost complete turnaround of his sound, just the laziness of the sound in this

MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 16th 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I suppose where you see laziness, I see beauty. The whole ramshackle and rickety recording style is easy to pass off as lazy, but I see it as Edwards expressing emotion through sound in crumbled and decayed states. What flows through most of the record is music channeled through little tube TVs and VHS reels, often times like your experiencing it from a distance in another room. All of these little incidents I find personal connections in and I loose myself within that sound.

Phlegm
May 25th 2014



3734 Comments


definitely gotta check this out after hearing this junt rite herrrre

Digging: Wretched Excess - Away From This World



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2013 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy