Our Lady Peace
Naveed


5.0
classic

Review

by Dr Dave De Sylvia STAFF
February 2nd, 2006 | 29 replies


Release Date: 1994 | Tracklist


As the first wave of popular grunge began to decline in 1994, accelerated by the suicide of its "Moses," Kurt Cobain, the scene sought desperately to re-invent itself and re-coup its numbers; a conservative revolution of sorts. Just like Guns N' Roses and their ilk shook up the '80s pop-metal scene while leaving its foundations surely in root, it became inevitable that the same must happen for the already decaying Seattle rock scene, now a nationwide and worldwide movement. In the vaguely detectable vacuum that formed emerged a new generation of alt. rock bands, less coarse and easier on the ear than their Seattle predecessors, though no more or less appealing to the record-buying masses. Bands like Bush and (later) Silverchair led the charge from overseas, combining the aggressive dirty guitar riffs and distinctive vocal style of Nirvana and their more punk-oriented contemporaries with the hard rock sensibilities which served the '80s bands grunge replaced so well.

One scene stagnates; a slightly altered one takes its place. Fittingly, it was a band made up of ex-Nirvana members, Dave Grohl's Foo Fighters, which launched "post-grunge"- the group's self-titled record a mix of heavy rock and punk with a saleable melodic root. Still, inevitabilities notwithstanding, few could have predicted the massive success of the debut album by Torontonian post-grunge outfit Our Lady Peace. The record, titled Naveed, took everybody by surprise when it hit the ground running in November 1994, achieving platinum, and then multi-platinum, status within a matter of months. Theirs was a sound not too far removed from their already mentioned post-grunge peers; that is to say they had a foot rooted very firmly in the recent past, yet they had a melodic classic rock core which harks back to the late '60s and early '70s.

At a modest forty-seven minutes across eleven tracks, Naveed is a fairly even split of radio-oriented pop-rock tracks and progressive alternative, each song technically and harmonically advanced, intricately arranged yet not so subtle as to lose the capacity to connect. Our Lady Peace wear their influences on their sleeves: three of grunge's big names loom large on the album- the atmospheric-yet aggressive rock tracks recall Soundgarden; drums and vocals often ape their contemporaries from the Smashing Pumpkins; while largest of all looms the shadow of Pearl Jam, from whose guitarists Mike Turner owes much. Still, the band reaches further for its pop sensibilities- melodic structure echoes at various points Led Zeppelin and the Beatles (later years would see covers of 'Tomorrow Never Knows,' 'If I Fell' and 'Imagine').

In order to get a handle on Naveed and Our Lady Peace, the first port of call has to be the erratic vocal stylings of Raine Maida. Truly unrivalled in his chosen field, Maida is the first thing everybody notes about the band, his shrill falsetto typically being employed liberally throughout any given song. It, perhaps, doesn't come as an awfully big surprise that Maida cites fellow vocal acrobats Sinéad O'Connor and Björk as major influences- both have been charged with over-indulgence and a distinct lack of tact as regards the use of their considerable vocal talents. Armed with a higher register than a man really should possess (despite his low speaking voice), Maida yelps and huffs his way through explosive album-opener 'The Birdman,' dominating a song he really has no right to, given the exquisite twin performances of Turner and drummer Jeremy Taggart.

Taggart is the real driving force beneath the stormy exterior, the key link in a chain of competing musical egos. Taggart comes from a jazz background (his parents were jazz musicians) but the ghost of John Bonham has an equally impressive presence, reflected in his heavy-hitting abrasive beats on songs such as �Starseed� and 'The Birdman,' while his more refined influences make themselves known on 'Denied,' which sees the bespectacled drummer switch between tabla and a regular drumset. His tactful, rolling rhythms in the bridge to 'Naveed' add to the section's tension. His partner on bass, Chris Eacrett, left soon after the release of the album but it's hard to see how 'Naveed' would sound without his unsettling repeated bass-line, and his slow, atmospheric notes on 'Denied' create an extra dimension of tension before the chorus explosion.

The architect of the explosion is, of course, Mike Turner, the only Michael in the band not to change his name to �Raine.� His is the gloomy, distortion-heavy guitar that laces the album; Mike's distortion-pedal gets a healthy workout through those forty-seven minutes, as the clean (delay-aided) picked chords of 'Is It Safe?,' 'Denied' and 'Julia' give way to heavy, chugging chorus riffs and screaming guitar solos. Elsewhere he maintains the quiet-verse, loud-chorus dynamic in spite of his singer's over-enthusiasm, ensuring that each chorus arrives on cue with the desired impact. His funky riffs on 'Supersatellite' help distinguish the track from the rest of the album, making it easily the most upbeat track in the collection.

While standout tracks are hard to pick out, due to the volume of technically impressive and melodically appealing material on offer, singles are usually a prime indicator of the quality of an album, and 'Naveed' isn't short of either singles or quality. Three singles were released from the album- 'The Birdman' achieved modest success upon release, though it probably suffered for its excessive length (over five minutes) and Maida's most intense vocal performance. However, the anthemic chorus, which sees the guitar riff turned on its head halfway through to create a most disorienting atmosphere, makes it clear why it was chosen for release. 'Naveed' is equally long but less likely to offend, with a more straightforward melodic structure and less �offensive� performances from Maida and Turner. 'Starseed' broke the band in the US, and it's easy to see why- the chorus was designed for the arena circuit, the type that'll stick to your ears like maple syrup and that shit never washes out. Less Pearl Jam than Mother Love Bone, the track's appeal is all the more apparent given its re-release to coincide with the Hollywood movie 'Armageddon' (The soundtrack also featured Raine's future wife, Chantal Kreviazuk).

Of the non-singles, there's just as much to be said; 'Hope' is the most satisfyingly uncomfortable listen you're likely to find, as the tense, bass-driven verses gradually build, creeping towards an almighty crescendo, whereupon we're informed "this woman [Hope] is gone," the seemingly senile/insane subjects name bitterly appropriate for the occasion. 'Julia,' on the other hand, is a fierce and angry rock song directed at Raine's typically complex subject. 'Neon Crossing' is screaming out for a techno remix, while 'Under Zenith' provides more evidence of the band's considerable skill and technical proficiency.

Each track on 'Naveed,' in truth, is worth as much as the next- the songs aren�t necessarily bound to one another but there�s a certain coherence to be found in the fluctuating tempo and changing styles- call it coherence in incoherence- and no one track is significantly worse than the rest to render it unnecessary. As an album, 'Naveed' has been somewhat lost with the success of its successors, hampered by its sparsity of recognised standout tracks, but it's a snapshot of one of the decade�s most talented mainstream bands at a time when they had the creative freedom to make an album so unique yet so easily reconcilable with the popular music of the time. The band would wait three years before following up the album- by the time 'Clumsy' was released the grunge scene had disappeared and Our Lady Peace had made a very different alternative rock record. 'Naveed' is a one-of-a-kind record and, luckily, Our Lady Peace never tried to re-create it.



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user ratings (172)
Chart.
3.8
excellent
other reviews of this album
Mike Stagno EMERITUS (4)
...

Serenity (4)
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Comments:Add a Comment 
pulseczar
February 3rd 2006


2385 Comments


Don't worry, it was great as usual, not my Simple Plan review great (so great that i had it deleted,) but still.

I haven't heard this, but I like Clumsy and Life in Repair.

edit: I meant Spiritual Machines, Life in Repair is a song., oopsie.This Message Edited On 02.02.06

morrissey
Moderator
February 3rd 2006


1688 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

The review was lacking the overt comedy elements of most of your other reviews, but it was still kickin rad.

I'm still not sure how I feel about OLP. I'm completely detached from the grunge movement and the bands (and genre) it inspired through post-grunge. I don't find it bad, I'm just ambivalent toward it. So I don't start digging OLP until their later, radio-oriented melodic sound kicks in full swing. (particularly on Clumsy, Happiness... and Spiritual Machines For that reason I'm just not too fond of this record. I feel kind of hypocritical because I don't like their straight up radio-rock work on Gravity... I don't know, I just like the middle ground on their middle records.



morrissey
Moderator
February 3rd 2006


1688 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

edit that won't fit into my post : the line about Mike Turner being the only Michael not to change his name to Raine and the part about maple syrup were very comedic I must say

Motleyguy
February 3rd 2006


118 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Great review, I think you've summed up the album perfectly. Our Lady Peace is probably my favourite band of all time, Spiritual Machines is what got me really into music, and I own all of their albums. This is an amazing album, but then again, everything they have put out has been amazing.This Message Edited On 02.03.06

Zesty Mordant
February 3rd 2006


1196 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Excellent review. Detailed, creative, very strong and smooth stuctured analysis of the tracks.

And man, I haven't listened to OLP in ages but this along with Clumsy are their finest works. I might just pull this out and give it a spin again.

Zebra
Moderator
February 3rd 2006


2647 Comments


The review was well written and easy to get through, you did a great job.
I have yet to hear a song by this band, and now I think I really should give them a listen.

Storm In A Teacup
February 3rd 2006


12780 Comments


Excellent review, a bit too long for me, but whatever.
I think I might buy Gravity sometime.

patrick5
June 27th 2006


40 Comments


i have heard a few of these songs, and they are pretty good. not that i am going to go out and buy the album or anything. it is a little too "emo screamo" sounding for me. but it's post-grunge. i know.

The Sludge
June 28th 2006


2169 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

:p wow. there is nothing emo or screamo or "emo screamo" on this album, or any other friggin' album of OLP's.
Great review though, very well written, I personally like Happiness... a bit better than this.
For now on, instead of actually saying 'Our Lady Peace', I'm actually going to pronounce OLP. Like Pulp, w/o the P.

Muisee
June 28th 2006


679 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Nope, not emo, not screamo or even the made up title of emo screamo, but its crap all the same.

Patrick
June 28th 2006


1891 Comments


patrick5 is pretty stupid. it thinks that just because a dude singer has a high pitched voice it makes it emo, like panic at the disco or fallout boy.

Tyler
Emeritus
September 18th 2006


7926 Comments


Their singer, uh, his voice is not my cup of tea. Great review, but I can't stand these guys. I used to see their drummer a lot, his momma used to live down the street, he's a nice guy, but that's irrelevant.

Patrick
September 18th 2006


1891 Comments


[quote=olphater]I used to see their drummer a lot, his momma used to live down the street, he's a nice guy, but that's irrelevant.[/quote]that's amazing, I wish I could live by Jeremy Taggert. I would tell him to cut his hair and lose the glasses though, cuz he's creepy looking. I might buy this album soon.


CanRock
September 18th 2006


2 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Our Lady Peace has nothing to do with emo whatsoever. Emo is mainstream, unoriginal, poppy crap. OLP is one of the most unique bands your ever gonna find out there.

Blindguardian
September 18th 2006


186 Comments


Excellent, you managed to counter someone ignorantly decrying this album as emo with an equally ignorant definition of your own, congrats

Neoteric
September 19th 2006


3243 Comments


Emo is mainstream, unoriginal, poppy crap.
Nuh-uh.

Patrick
September 19th 2006


1891 Comments


what you think is emo is mainstream unoriginal poppy crap. real emo is something completely different. OLP is not that unique though, and i'm a fanboy.

Patrick
September 19th 2006


1891 Comments


?^?

Nobody knows what emo is, except maybe you Spat cuz you're a genius. All I know is that OLP is not emo, bands commonly thought to be emo (MCR, P!ATD, AFI etc.) are generally just pop punk bands. I once went to the emo section of this site. I hadn't heard of any of those bands, so I'm guessing I've never heard emo before.

Iluvatar
Staff Reviewer
September 19th 2006


16088 Comments


^^ Shut up about emo, you really don't know what you're talking about. Not to be mean though, just saying.
Everyone I know personally expresses extreme hatred for OLP, but since they seem to be extremely well liked on the site (and have suddenly exploded disucssion wise), I may just have to check them out past one or two singles now.

Patrick
September 19th 2006


1891 Comments


[quote=iluvatar]you really don't know what you're talking about[/quote]you're right, I don't. that was my point. I've never heard emo before, unless band's that have been hailed as emo really are emo. I should probably just shut up now.


OLP RULES



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