Hans Zimmer
The Dark Knight Rises


2.0
poor

Review

by Jake C. Taylor USER (90 Reviews)
August 2nd, 2012 | 69 replies | 7,544 views


Release Date: 2012 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A necessary evil with an unfortunate soundtrack.

7 of 9 thought this review was well written

Despite Inception having illuminated Hans Zimmer’s style more so than any other film he’s worked on, the effects of a stronger relationship between him and Christopher Nolan just aren’t found anywhere in the music of The Dark Knight Rises. The solidification of this bond was the reason for the departure of James Newton Howard from the team, citing the reluctance of becoming a “third wheel”. Granted, Newton Howard acted, for the most part, as a compositional accessory during Batman Begins and The Dark Knight, composing mainly the music for all the non-action sequences and filling the gaps of Hans Zimmer’s metallic driving rhythms. His input however produced scores, which despite their drab linings, became fairly dynamic and agreeable affairs. For this final chapter, Zimmer, now left primarily to his own devices, offers a set of familiar cues (some good, some bad) next to a few questionable new ones; think the serious stridence of Crimson Tide meeting Pirates of the Caribbean’s rollicking impetus and we’re left with an hour or so of material that’s just as easily devoured elsewhere, and in many instances in a better, shinier shell.

Here, Catwoman’s brazenly barren and cheeky piano (“Mind If I Cut In?”) and Bane’s uncharacteristic uninspired mess of chants and hammer-drill rhythms (“Gotham’s Reckoning”) form part of the new substance, both of which are incredibly lacklustre pieces of music. On the other hand, Batman’s drawn-out two note brass theme (found shining in brightly “Despair” and “The Fire Rises”), surpasses all because it imparts (and always has) the initiative of freedom from restraint, whether it’s simply the defiance of gravity or escaping a prison-in-a-well somewhere in the desert. Hearing this bares great connotations to us as audience members; but both Bane and Catwoman, who are equally as important to most of the story, need their own something to embody their eccentricities further than just musical clichés. Catwoman isn’t just a dimensionless sexed up thief; Anne Hathaway showed a more faint embroiled humanity to her character. Tom Hardy as Bane too is a forceful entity, expressing ruffled emotion beyond the restraint of his breathing apparatus, even more so than Batman’s questionably grim temperament. Together the music of Bane and Catwoman just doesn't equate to their significance as characters, becoming what can only be described as “Muzak” for the cinema.

Indeed, not all here is the tasteless wheels of a lack of inspiration at work. Outside the cinema the disc itself opens with “On Thin Ice”, which upon hearing it in its solitary distance with female choir and synth, produces emotions of beauty and anxiety&this is quickly converted into reverence as it begins to take shape with Zimmer’s now iconic use of the cello. The electronic bubbling bass in “Underground Army” is essentially Batman’s theme, churned into what can best be described as “The Kraken [Bruce Wayne Remix]”; it’s equally enjoyable as the previous example, but probably for all the wrong reasons: the stolen melody from The Kraken pokes its head again in “Imagine the Fire” showing that perhaps Zimmer lost insight along the way somewhere. What rapidly comes to assurance with all this is that like most of Zimmer’s scores, there are moments to be enjoyed, but there are also too many places of uncertainty surrounding the momentum and overall design of the work. Just as the films pacing comes into question, so too does the musical haphazardness of Zimmer’s seemingly unfinished exertion.

The shame is that when given an opportunity to excel, Zimmer frequently doesn’t, opting to reuse designs from elsewhere without batting an eyelid. He’s becoming, if not already become, the Michael Bay of film score&the go-to for Hollywood, to make music an audience can simply munch popcorn to&only because in most instances his name is worth more than his regularly unapparent skills. The grandiose vision for Batman was ambitious and well executed, visually, cinematically and conceptually. We sadly can’t say the same for most of its music&The Dark Knight Rises marks as being the worst of the three in this regard.



Recent reviews by this author
Arch Enemy War EternalCavern Cavern
Periphery Periphery II: This Time It's PersonalSantigold Master of My Make-Believe
Age of Evil A.O.E.Meshuggah Koloss
user ratings (94)
Chart.
3.6
great

Comments:Add a Comment 
Omaha
Staff Reviewer
August 2nd 2012



9975 Comments


Awesome review, man.

I see you're not too keen on the score, but you liked the movie? :] i still have to see it.

Digging: Deniro Farrar - Rebirth

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Thanks.

I enjoyed the movie, to some degree. Like others I disliked the numerous plot holes, the terrible sound mixing (relating to Bane's voice) and some others, but I didn't hate it. I guess you could say I was content.

MO
August 2nd 2012



18194 Comments


Great review Jake

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

"ive only heard the songs this guy contrubuted to requiem for a dream"

Well then you'd be mistaken entirely because that score was composed by Clint Mansell and performed largely by the Kronos Quartet.

evilford
August 2nd 2012



21012 Comments


nice review, I also remember being particularly unmoved by the score, as opposed to Batman Begins and TDK.

didn't listen to the full Inception soundtrack, but in the movie it sounded great too.

Digging: Morta Skuld - As Humanity Fades

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

That "one song" you're thinking of is probably Lux Aeterna, and no, it was composed by Mansell.

Omaha
Staff Reviewer
August 2nd 2012



9975 Comments


Cool man, thanks. I'm just hesitant to watch something in the theater for 2 1/2 + hours because I'm an impatient bastard, but I'll have to check it out.

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

"Cool man, thanks. I'm just hesitant to watch something in the theater for 2 1/2 + hours because I'm an impatient bastard, but I'll have to check it out."

It's not something I found I was looking at my watch at despite the length. Every moment had it's place. It's just a lot of it was the pacing and editing that I didn't like.

It's still worth seeing if you ask me because it proves once again the filming with IMAX cameras in 2D shits all over 3D bullshit being pedalled by production executives.

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Yes he did some of Lion King.

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Elfman is, for the most part, a great composer with a hell of a lot of style. He's one of the few
rock-turned-film-composers that I can say I really enjoy. His score for Burton's Batman films are
very good.

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Also,

"3D is nothing but a ploy to make you pay more money for a ticket."

Yes, this is true; to cover the cost associated in purchasing the equipment required to display 3D cinema chains ranked up their prices. By now, you'd safely assume that those debts have been recompensed, yet of course ticket prices are either stable or on the increase. No surprises there.

"half the time you can take off your glasses and it'd be no different than if you decided to keep them on."

No. This is not true.

MO
August 2nd 2012



18194 Comments


can't stand 3D, people who choose to watch 3D movies are buying into the shittiest of gimmicks and being robbed

I saw this on a regular 'ol screen and was just as into the movie as if I'd seen it in 3D

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

All 3D films look "blurry" when viewed without visual aid. The amount of blur/shadow is proportional to the depth with which the compositors want the material to extend from the screen.

This means that some parts may look comparably unchanged (but you wouldn't genuinely know what unchanged meant until you properly compared it with the unaltered content), and others not, which is an obvious result; you wouldn't want it to be always sticking out at you.

MO
August 2nd 2012



18194 Comments


^^ yea exactly, from what I've seen it's more the background, or more deep scenery like you mentioned, that stays blurry whereas everything in the forefront is pretty much the same


Xenophanes
Emeritus
August 2nd 2012



10585 Comments


Added to the sound editing, the film editing was kinda bad as well.

Great review man, I agree that this is pretty lame but I don't think it really hurt the movie. As a stand alone listen though I bet this is pretty bad.

Digging: United Nations - The Next Four Years

taylormemer
August 2nd 2012



4913 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Cheers dude. No, this didn't hurt the film, but it didn't really add to it either.

Xenophanes
Emeritus
August 2nd 2012



10585 Comments


There we some weird choices, like the kinda out of place Ravel during the ballroom scene.

(Fun fact: I played that pavane as a trombone solo in the eighth grade.)

taxidermist
August 2nd 2012



7195 Comments


HOLY FUCK XENO MADE STAFF! Congrats man, I had no idea :-D

I remember when you were still a user :'-)

MO
August 2nd 2012



18194 Comments


whoa where the shit have you been taxi? been a while

sifFlammable
August 2nd 2012



2741 Comments


movie got pretty average after bane blew up the bomb

but the series overall was fucking amazing and fuck you for doing this review and even attempting to cast the movie in a negative light



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2013 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy