Burial
Kindred


4.5
superb

Review

by Deviant STAFF
February 13th, 2012 | 2104 replies | 100,589 views


Release Date: 2012 | Tracklist

Review Summary: For Burial, the darkness has finally come calling

In an interview with The Wire that dates back to the tail end of 2007, Will Bevan alluded to his music as a way of paying tribute to a scene and a time that he was too young to be a part of. His experience with rave and jungle music a communion between younger and older brother, the dialogue the crackle and hiss of vinyl spinning late into the night. Bevan’s subsequent growth and emergence as an artist is, by and large, the result of those trinkets secreted to him in the dead of night. Whether his role as a musician is one of tribute or merely the result of him doing all he can to remember, to keep those memories from fading away into the murky fog of history is secondary; the result, one which ended up as honest as simply opening up a window and aiming a microphone directly into the teeming heart of life in motion, was perhaps all that truly mattered. Burial’s always managed to carry a certain kind of aura about him, as if he’s following in the footsteps of a time that he could only dream about. The footsteps of no one in particular, instead merely those of inspiration, following the echoes in the deep dead of night - a frenzied pursuit amongst the shadows and one that Bevan will probably attest to not having any clear end in sight. Burial was the nod to mid-‘90s jungle, Untrue rattling the bones of garage – an identity always present, but as revealing as an image of a man hunched over, hood falling over the dark circles of blurry eyes, cigarette smoke circling him like halos.

Yet for all the attention and all the acclaim, Bevan has never really played his cards close to his chest. As much as can be deciphered that points to his longing, it’s a journey that he seems unwilling to take by himself. The sound of footsteps scattering into the night, of tires crunching indelicately down a deserted street, the rain hammering relentlessly against glass equally at work supporting the tired heads of the nocturnal – Bevan isn’t looking to replicate, but instead to design a world recognizable enough to be not just his, but yours. But while it might be a world that seems overly familiar, even something casually embraced, Bevan lives it. He makes music to fill in the gaps of the city he calls home, the in-between world that exists between each skyscraper and concrete monolith, buildings bought down by years of use and misuse. Even the embrace of a new home on Street Halo was met with the confidence that stems from association, even if that memory might not have been his own. Kindred however is a much more sinister entity, a turn into unfamiliar territory, where the shadows fall in the absence of a much different light. And for the first time, Burial seems to be looking for a way out, or at the very least, someone to help him find his exit.

To start with, Kindred is a release steeped in contradictions: the EP’s numerous false endings, ‘Loner’s’ time-travelling relic of an anthem at odds with the discovery, the acceptance present in ‘Kindred’; the many faces of ‘Ashtray Wasp’ and the way that track (more of a suite, really) ends with the passive resistance of a new day yet loops right back into ‘Loner’. It shows the artist as being, perhaps for the first time, hesitant, not of direction but approach. For the first time he fails to truly internalize the struggle that’s long been present in his music, the constant push and pull, the back and forth that’s been at the core of his dichotomy, the split identity of Bevan the day worker, and Bevan as Burial, the last man pushing the buttons to keep the moon in orbit. The voices he utilizes are now shouts and cries amidst the turmoil, the former echoes and whispers dissolved into the night, etched into the fading brick and peeling paint of his underworld. As if he’s forgotten how to shut them out, he finds himself in a cage, surrounded by the caterwaul of a faceless crowd, each lone voice only contributing to the descending oblivion.

Even ‘Loner’, perhaps the most straightforward of tracks present, matches the cacophony by constantly building in an attempt to usurp the shaking of his damaged sceptre, damage control that fails to squelch the intensity. And even though the track finds itself at odds with the rest of the artist’s canon, with its 4x4 precision and rave sequencing, it is still unmistakably Bevan – melodies are distant and scratchy, like the sound of life in the next room caught in the sphere of a drinking glass held in place by weary arms, or like a pirate radio broadcast, attentively captivating under the light of a torch and a roof of bed sheets; it’s the sound of London, but this time by way of the smoky techno of Berlin. ‘Kindred’ plays out more like a gentle understanding, a meeting point between the faceless romantic and a possible counterpoint; a positive or perhaps negative, an alternate charge. It begins with Burial at perhaps his most venomous, his jittery and fluid percussion never as fearsome as it is here. But in the act of acceptance he cuts it dead in its tracks, only to re-emerge, with partner in hand, now shot under a lens of burgeoning anticipation, and, for a lack of a better word, a certain kind of hope.

Which sets up ‘Ashtray Wasp’ in the most ambiguous of ways, which explains not only the track’s reach but its constant set-ups and illusory climaxes – it’s a song in a constant state of evolution, as definable as a silhouette wrapped in fog or a welcoming smile hidden behind the most diaphanous of fabrics. As perhaps the pinnacle of Burial’s creations it finds itself indebted to its owners many guises and identities, cycling through overture to finale in a kaleidoscopic blink of an eye. It’s Burial at his most restless, scrapping ideas mid sentence, changing tact and form, applying himself to all manner of shapes and disguises. It’s a death shroud of sorts for his former ambiguity, a journey away from a sheltering corner, or patch of roof, and in this process of acceptance, of moving on, he inadvertently takes his alter-ego, his downtrodden persona, and places it far above the highest echelons of both myth and legend. And Kindred as a whole release is that almost painful acceptance, that unwillingness to let go and move on, to get gone, lost in the crowd. Like a pang of guilt does he sample his former self, like a torch carried to its final flicker of illumination. And to hear all that, to be able to almost feel that happening, is to bear witness to an artist working at the apex of his talent.



Recent reviews by this author
Burial Rival DealerDeadmau5 > album title goes here <
Mala Mala In CubaFour Tet Pink
Shed The KillerTNGHT TNGHT
user ratings (727)
Chart.
4.2
excellent
other reviews of this album
Liam Whear (4.5)
Skrillex is in trouble...

LudditeStereo (4.5)
Burial sheds skin and adds muscle...


Comments:Add a Comment 
Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



30320 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

For some reason I struggled mightily with this, and it probably is far too long but fuck it

If you can't read the news, stream/buy the digital release (and it's dirt cheap) here:
http://www.hyperdub.net/releases/view/149/HDB059

Digging: L'Orange - The Orchid Days

Butkuiss
February 13th 2012



3905 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

This is godly.


Digging: Solitary Son - All Our Yesterdays

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



30320 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

And before this undoubtedly gets bought up:

https://twitter.com/#!/Hyperdub/status/168865860386172929

Bloodbirds
February 13th 2012



250 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Really good review. The EP is godly. I just hope the vinyl doesn't sell out in record time (as it inevitably does).

Gyromania
February 13th 2012



14653 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Masturbated to "Kindred" and came all over my keyboard. Seriously though, this EP is fan-fucking-tastic! Good read, Dev.

fish.
Contributing Reviewer
February 13th 2012



20256 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Just listened to Street Halo. Will listen to this later

Digging: YG - My Krazy Life

Electric City
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



15697 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

whoa, mother. i love how you interpret these songs, though i don't always get exactly what you mean. that being said, review is great, and this EP is the real deal. hope his next album continues in this sprawling direction

qwe3
February 13th 2012



21154 Comments


title track is delicious i love how the record manages to sound both cold and warm at the same time.

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



30320 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

though i don't always get exactly what you mean.


If you want to point some stuff out, I could shed some more light maybe?

Lucid
Contributing Reviewer
February 13th 2012



6966 Comments


Isn't the track ordering Kindred, Loner, then Ashtray Wasp? You said that Ashtray Wasp loops back into Loner in the review.

Digging: Perfume Genius - Learning

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



30320 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

That is the tracklisting

I meant how thematically, 'Ashtray Wasp' ends on something of a positive note, but how the last few seconds sync up perfectly with 'Loner', as if the "positivity', or the "hope" is really just premature. The same way that 'Kindred', with its idea of a kindred spirit is at odds with 'Loner', the track that follows it

Electric City
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



15697 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

just some of the descriptions. i can tell they're striking images for you that i wouldn't have ever pulled up. it's not a criticism, really, but what im talking about is stuff like this:

"Even ‘Loner’, perhaps the most straightforward of tracks present, matches the cacophony by constantly building in an attempt to usurp the shaking of his damaged sceptre, damage control that fails to squelch the intensity."

like i personally don't get that image or even am 100% sure of what it means, so i suppose it could be articulated more clearly, but again, im not going to begrudge you flowery writing, especially when its obvious you're passionate about the release and what you're writing

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



30320 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

like i personally don't get that image or even am 100% sure of what it means, so i suppose it could be articulated more clearly, but again, im not going to begrudge you flowery writing, especially when its obvious you're passionate about the release and what you're writing


The idea for that stemmed from 'Loner' being this track that constantly builds in intensity, each time the synths re-appear they're louder, the motifs are always a few notches higher than they were before. And in those moments there are no vocals, no samples - as if he's trying to drown out the words, his words. He doesn't want to hear them anymore

Insert foreveralone.jpeg

Electric City
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



15697 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

see that makes a lot of sense. i dont know, maybe stuff like that could be reeled in and articulated a different way in your review but anything i throw out would be nitpicking, as this is a great piece of writing overall

SowingSeason
Emeritus
February 13th 2012



14513 Comments


Wow. Great review Dev, I've been getting into Burial as of the past few months so I'll certainly listen to this.

InFiction
February 13th 2012



3591 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

I hate the hyperdub artwork for this. I much prefer the other artwork.

Adash
February 13th 2012



1356 Comments


Burial making melodies that actually sound artifically programmed and unashamedly arpeggiated. Fo' shame Bev



DBlitz
February 13th 2012



1685 Comments


this v good

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
February 13th 2012



30320 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5


I hate the hyperdub artwork for this. I much prefer the other artwork.


What other artwork?

bartini
February 13th 2012



4 Comments


Adash you can't be upset just because Burial got his hands on an 808.

The question is, how can he keep on being this inventive on every EP?



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2013 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy