Sleepmakeswaves
...and so we destroyed everything


4.5
superb

Review

by YetAnotherBrick USER (28 Reviews)
September 3rd, 2011 | 27 replies | 3,499 views


Release Date: 2011 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Fresh, diverse, and absolutely exhilarating.

1 of 1 thought this review was well written

sleepmakeswaves‘ …and so we destroyed everything is a post-rock album. Yes, yes, indeed it is. It contains virtually all the common conventions of the genre: the sprawled-out song structures, those build-ups always trying to keep you on the edge of your seat, those meandering guitar harmonies, and those crashing climaxes meant to drop the listener’s jaw straight to the ground. But while the album has all of these things, …and so we destroyed everything still remains…different. From beginning to end, the album takes these conventions, and either adds to them, or completely turns them around. The instrumentation is diverse and varied, as is the way the songs are built. As a result of this, …and so we destroyed everything never loses an ounce of life throughout its entire duration, unlike many post-rock albums that strictly follow these conventions and these conventions only.

One example of how …and so we destroyed everything puts a spin on common post-rock conventions is what the album does with…the build-up. There’s this certain element of unpredictability floating all throughout the album. And this element most often shows through these false-alarm build-ups, moments where you think that a loud, crushing, magnificent climax unlike anything you’ve ever heard is just seconds away, only to hear the same melody, the one that was getting louder and louder in order to create that build-up, go back to its original volume and continue meandering. I know, this sounds like it could get annoying, but the way this album does it, it’s actually kinda awesome. It feels like it’s just doing it to throw you for a fun little loop every once in a while, rather than to just constantly fuck with you and insult your intelligence like some grade-school bully cauterizing ants with a magnifying glass or something. It’s in “now we rise and we are everywhere,” at about the 1:24 mark. That little bit of guitar feedback grows and grows and grows and then…bam. Back to the same pretty, meandering pattern the song began with. And that’s totally fine, because like I just said, the pattern is really, really pretty.

There’s another false build-up helping to keep things interesting at around the 7:55 mark of “a gaze blank and pitiless as the sun.” This one may be even more creative though, because not only does it build up to the point of making the listener think that something huge is coming, but when it stops building up, it transitions back down… into another build-up. Chords are strumming in the front, a higher, distant guitar melody is in the background, a quick few hits of the toms and then…a big chord is strummed and sustained, while the drum roll begins…

Another way …and so we destroyed everything livens up the common conventions of post-rock is specifically how the album’s songs are constructed and arranged. A lot of post-rock bands put way too much emphasis on the climax, apparently under the illusion that that’s the part that’s always the best part of the song, always the most emotional. Sleepmakeswaves puts the right amount of emphasis on everything, including the parts some other post-rock bands write as quick as possible and fill in with whatever so they can quickly get to the climax. All of the meandering passages between the build-ups, the false build-ups, the climaxes, and the calm-downs make me feel like I’m gleefully skipping through the heart of the woods in the middle of autumn, a gorgeous haze of orange above my head, and the crunching of leaves beneath my feet. “we like you when you’re awkward” is pretty much this for its entirety, it almost acts an interlude, or an intro to get you ready for “…and so we destroyed everything,” the mind-smashingly epic 12-minute closing track that follows. It’s an absolutely delightful little track, consisting of a cute little key pattern, along with some acoustic guitars, and some electronic noises quietly bouncing off of everything in the background. Which brings me to another reason why this album is consistently so fun and refreshing: the diverse instrumentation.

There are passages all throughout the album in which the guitars, bass, drums, and synths are complemented by light, bouncy little electronic noises. The album pops with these sounds, they’re light, fun, and to be honest, just make me really happy when I hear them. Of course, this isn’t the only example of the album’s diversity, though. There’s a brilliant piano pattern, played by itself at the beginning of the title track. And there’s triumphant-sounding horns near the end of “a gaze blank and pitiless as the sun.” The only thing all the songs really have in common is the basic instruments (guitar, bass, drums, and synths). As far as structure and other kinds of instrumentation go, all the songs are completely individual, which means, you guessed it, the album never gets long, stale, or dull even in the slightest.

Well, I’ve mostly just been rambling on and on about how cool how the structures of …and so we destroyed everything’s songs are, and about the instruments being used. But when all these instruments come together in the structures in which they’re placed, how do they actually sound? Let me tell you, it’s a beautiful culmination of moving, soothing, and awe-inspiring. It’s fitting that “to you they are birds, to me they are voices in the forest” has a moment like the one around 3:24, because that moment soars like an eagle. The part around 1:07 of “(hello) cloud mountain” is happiness in audio form, and the first climax of “a gaze blank and pitiless as the sun” at 3:33 is simply spectacular. This album just never quits being awesome.

…and so we destroyed everything takes the common conventions of post-rock and shines and waxes them until they’re more vibrant and beautiful than they seem to have been for a long time. The album is intricate, elegant, and epic, but actually quite easy to digest, due to the varying song lengths. Before each of the two longest tracks a shorter track is placed, and “in limbs and joints” and “(hello) cloud mountain” aren’t long at all. This is another little thing sleepmakeswaves has cleverly put into their unique post-rock formula. And with that final ingredient, the formula comes together beautifully in the end, creating a post-rock album that will spin your head and touch your heart. Let’s hope sleepmakeswaves didn’t destroy everything, ‘cause like, they need their guitars and stuff to make another album like this. And another album like this would be fucking wonderful.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
YetAnotherBrick
September 3rd 2011



4411 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Kinda got a little informal here, eh :P I had fun writing it. Album rules extremely hard, if you couldn't tell.

Scoot
September 3rd 2011



17731 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5 | Sound Off

nice man, good to see someone else reviewing this

FelixCulpa
September 3rd 2011



1239 Comments


Not sure what I want to rate this. Really dig the first half but I feel it drags some in the second. I'll need to give another listen. Good review though!

Tyrael
September 3rd 2011



20828 Comments


Plains of The Purple Buffalo > this but good review

Lucid
Contributing Reviewer
September 3rd 2011



7023 Comments


Agree that the new *shels album is better. This isn't too bad though.

Digging: FKA twigs - LP1

Aids
Contributing Reviewer
September 3rd 2011



23806 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

i feel like this is a grower, though i still liked it a lot on first listen.

that cover art is really cool too.

minty901
September 3rd 2011



1982 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

i just dont get it. i give it a 3 because im a fanboy but kinda feel like this deserves a 2.5. plains of the purple buffalo is incredible, this album doesnt deserve to be mentioned in the same breath. i very much enjoyed your review though. maybe i should write a first review on this but i dont know if id be any good

Irving
Staff Reviewer
September 3rd 2011



7177 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

K. So the repetitiveness of Explosions in the Sky kinda ruined my perceptions of the genre. Can this album fix it?

Digging: Ty Segall - Manipulator

minty901
September 3rd 2011



1982 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

in what way did eits ruin your perceptions? you mean in the sense that you found them boring/repetitive so you assumed, due to their popularity, that most other post-rock will likely also be repetitive? personally i cant see this changing your mind but im the minority anyway

Tyrael
September 3rd 2011



20828 Comments


K. So the repetitiveness of Explosions in the Sky kinda ruined my perceptions of the genre. Can this album fix it?

Explosions in the Sky is a really average band that only made 1 good album. Don't judge an entire genre based on that.

minty901
September 3rd 2011



1982 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

i agree that an opinion on one band shouldnt shape your opinion of the genre, but i disagree that eits are average

Irving
Staff Reviewer
September 3rd 2011



7177 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

in what way did eits ruin your perceptions? you mean in the sense that you found them boring/repetitive so you assumed, due to their popularity, that most other post-rock will likely also be repetitive?

Both. I found EitS' works to be aimless records filled with pretentiously-titled songs (which mean a grand total of nothing) and typical, predictable patterns. Build, build, build, build...release. And since lots of places and people champion them as symbols of the genre I couldn't help but get the impression that this was all the style of music had to offer.

Don't judge an entire genre based on that.

I know I shouldn't be doing this, but hell, how does one not?

minty901
September 3rd 2011



1982 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

id say that if youre not a fan of eits then you should look elsewhere, because sleepmakes waves are pretty similar. there will be post rock bands that appeal to you in the form of more rocky or funky instrumentals. though admittedly i like the eits style so i dont know many bands outside of that. maybe try do make say think, 65daysofstatic, the drift, tangled thoughts of leaving etc? avoid godspeed you like the plague

scissorlocked
September 3rd 2011



3509 Comments


Plains of The Purple Buffalo > this

i need to listen to this, but Plains of The Purple Buffalo quickly got a little boring due to extensive epicness and recurrence of themes

minty901
September 3rd 2011



1982 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

"i need to listen to this, but Plains of The Purple Buffalo quickly got a little boring due to extensive epicness and recurrence of themes."

I feel that way about this album. They re-use the same synth-sounding wall of sound throughout.

DarkNoctus
Contributing Reviewer
September 3rd 2011



8780 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Plains of The Purple Buffalo > this but good review


nah this edges *shels :]

TomF
September 3rd 2011



7 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Don't reckon it's as good as the In Today Already Walks Tomorrow EP. Still bloody good.

DarkNoctus
Contributing Reviewer
September 3rd 2011



8780 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I feel that way about this album. They re-use the same synth-sounding wall of sound throughout.


sure but in sleepmakeswaves' defense, this is 52 minutes. plains is over 76 minutes. :]

YetAnotherBrick
September 3rd 2011



4411 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

this album destroys Plains of the Purple Buffalo. That album is way too stop-start. It loses consistency in a lot of spots. It's still a 3.5 or a 4 though, just because the awesome parts are so awesome.

Also, to whoever said it first, yes, this album does have synth-walls in every song, but they're all different. And they really do give the album a bright, fresh sound that, to be honest, I haven't heard anything exactly like.

YetAnotherBrick
September 3rd 2011



4411 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

And on Explosions in the Sky, The Earth Is Not A Cold Dead Place is really the only album of theirs anyone really needs. That's their only album where their songwriting really shines. On all their other albums, the harmonies overlap each other too much and there's way too many parts of songs that seem like they're pointless. On The Earth, every passage of each song is there for a reason. It's what makes that album's songs so memorable and so powerful.



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