Thousand Foot Krutch
The Flame in All of Us


4.0
excellent

Review

by David Shephard USER (22 Reviews)
August 7th, 2011 | 19 replies | 3,970 views


Release Date: 2007 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A strangely intimate and meaningful album from a band you would never expect such from.

3 of 3 thought this review was well written

I’ve always thought of Trevor McNevan as being one of the more curious vocalists in music. He’s a tad too gritty to be a pansy, but he’s also certainly way too soft to accurately fill that slightly obnoxious role of a hard rock front man. He carries this charm throughout all of his music that makes him pretty hard to hate, but at the same time he’s also a little hard to take seriously. His music with Thousand Foot Krutch and FM Static ranges from solid and mildly enjoyable (Phenomenon, What Are You Waiting For?) to absolutely terrible (Set It Off, which is the worst album I’ve ever heard, My Brain Says Stop But My Heart Says Go). His almost childish quality makes Thousand Foot Krutch pretty easily serve as one of those “childhood bands” in younger formative years (which I have to admit Thousand Foot Krutch was for me a bit). He carries the toughness that a junior high boy admires and believes to be characteristic of “adults” but at the same time he’s much too vulnerable and innocent to forsake the pre/just starting hormonal preteen. And like that young boy, Trevor McNevan must eventually grow up, even if it is completely temporary and fleeting. The Flame In All Of Us is his only mature album.

The starkest difference between TFIAOU and every other Thousand Foot Krutch album is that there is no cheesy arena rock single on the album to be found. “Falls Apart” is the closest, which is interestingly one of TFK’s weakest lead singles ever. It functions better in an album context than as a bombastic single, and apart from it there isn’t a clear “single” song found on the rest of the album. TFIAOU is remarkably consistent and even, and although it may seem to lack standout tracks, it also is nearly absent of filler tracks. That’s not to say that it is particularly album oriented with interludes, overall themes, etc., but it feels like for the first time Thousand Foot Krutch decided to focus on deep tracks rather than lead singles, to the point of not even really writing singles. That’s not to say that some of the choruses aren’t really anthemic, but at least the songs are actually about legitimate things. It’s often in the slowest portions of the album that the strengths are the most defined, such as the mid album ballad “What Do We Know?” which is a genuine and beautiful track with extremely well-written verses, a classic Thousand Foot Krutch chorus, and a surprisingly effective use of a children’s choir. The last two tracks are also among the best of TFK’s career, especially the nostalgic, heartfelt pop closer “The Last Song.” It’s a tad ironic that McNevan’s most mature and worthwhile moments of his career come in his most gentle and soft, which is the opposite of what the young adolescent is looking for in his search for “maturity.”

I have this tendency to call this McNevan’s “mid-life crisis” album, but maybe that’s not accurate at all. The follow up, Welcome To The Masquerade, may be the truer “mid-life crisis” album, in which McNevan looks back on his brief maturity and rejects it, returning to the THROW UP THE RAWKFIST days, with choruses like “it’s getting cold in here, so somebody fire it up!” It’s tempting to point the finger and accuse him of being just trying to be another crowd pleasing silly show man, but at some point we have to realize that McNevan will never truly grow up. So what we are left with is one album of “maybe I’m getting too old for this,” which regardless of other discography is an honest, vulnerable, and strangely intimate hard rock/rock album that will likely forever be the closest look into one of music’s biggest man-childs. Recommended.



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user ratings (161)
Chart.
3.2
good
other reviews of this album
Nathaniel Fritz (3.5)
It's not Phenomenonal, but TFK's latest record is certainly an enjoyable assault on the senses....


Comments:Add a Comment 
Eko
August 7th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

One of my most nostalgic albums, I felt like I should justify the rating I have it at. I reviewed it at a 4 because the objective part of me realizes it's not quite as good as I like to think it is but this one sure carries some memories.

Blackbelt54
August 7th 2011



4269 Comments


nice review, have a pos

although you didn't describe what the music sounds like

Eko
August 7th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Yeah I've been realizing lately that whenever I review anything I always assume that the reader already knows what the band sounds like or they have listened to them before

Blackbelt54
August 7th 2011



4269 Comments


so is this like post-grunge or nu-metal or something?

pizzamachine
August 7th 2011



12571 Comments


Fairly good review, but ditto on what Blackbelt said. Pos!

PistolPete
August 7th 2011



3591 Comments


Was impressed with the latest album from these guys, but yes it's painful to say it's "arena rock" sometimes. "Phenomenon" is my favorite from these guys though, guess I'm a fan of the louder stuff.

Digging: Jolly - The Audio Guide to Happiness (Part 2)

Maniac!
August 7th 2011



26250 Comments


This band is so bad. Even the nostalgia of phenomenon makes up for it.

Eko
August 8th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Why the neg?

And yeah @blackbelt something like that but it's their most just straightforward rock release

foreverendeared
August 8th 2011



14678 Comments


Trolls man, effin trolls.

fromtheinside
August 8th 2011



18030 Comments


i actually think falls apart is their greatest single yet. this is also, dare i say, their greatest
album yet, phenomenon is close though

Digging: Transcending Bizarre? - The Serpent's Manifolds

Emim
August 8th 2011



26611 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

1 and 2 are some of their best songs.


THO UP YOUR RAWKFIST
IF YOU'RE FEELING IT WHEN I DROP THIS

UNH UNH

tiesthatbind
August 8th 2011



7373 Comments


Never got into this band.

I'll jam out to Rawkfist like everybody else though.

Emim
August 8th 2011



26611 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Bounce will always be my favorite.

tiesthatbind
August 8th 2011



7373 Comments


I only know singles. They just never grabbed my attention like Disciple, Decyfer Down, and Skillet did.

fromtheinside
August 8th 2011



18030 Comments


bounce is legit. but emim always knows whats up

Eko
August 8th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

As a band they arent the strongest of those Christian hard rock bands, but then again none of them were ever consistent in any sense. Decyfer Down is terrible and Skillet really only has Comatose. Red might be the best now except their new album was a let down. I had my brief interest in the scene a few years back and this, Comatose, and Red are the only things I took away from it.

Emim
August 8th 2011



26611 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

There are more than just those few bands/albums. Project 86 - Songs to Burn Your Bridges By, Disciple - Scars Remain, The Letter Black - Breaking the Silence, P.O.D. - Testify, Pillar - The Reckoning, The Showdown - Temptation Come My Way, Since October - Gasping for Hope.

I mean, it isn't some vast untapped well of music, but those are good.

Eko
August 8th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

never really liked the singles I've heard from most of those bands except for project 86. somehow I never listened to P.O.D. though.

fromtheinside
August 8th 2011



18030 Comments


the showdown are awful though



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