Counting Crows
Saturday Nights and Sunday Mornings


4.5
superb

Review

by Adam Amanse USER (12 Reviews)
April 10th, 2010 | 14 replies | 7,234 views


Release Date: 2008 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A whirlwind of emotion and haunting lyrics make the Crows' first studio album since 2002 a staple piece of their discography. Perhaps even outdoing the ever-so popular "August and Everything After".

6 of 6 thought this review was well written

When you think of the Counting Crows, you think of pop vocal melodies of "Sha La La La La La, yeah" and being "Accidentally In Love" with Shrek, but do people really see the genius that is Adam Duritz? Granted most music listeners don't notice the poetry and emotion in the lyrics that Adam writes, nor do they hear the great musicianship that is to be found on this latest Crows album. "Saturday Nights and Sunday Mornings" is a beautiful arrangement of haunting vocals and a barrage of instruments ranging from the guitar to the triangle.

"Saturday Nights and Sunday Mornings" is broken up into two discs. The first one being "Saturday Nights" and the later obviously being "Sunday Mornings". The first disc starts off with the pounding single "1492" which has Adam comparing himself to Christopher Columbus. This is the most "Rock and Roll" song on the album, as it has catchy guitar hooks and a very nice, flowing chorus. It moves on to one of my personal favorites on the album, "Hanging Tree". This song infuses a very bluesy, easy-going guitar riff that serves as the songs backbone. The lyrics show Adam's persistance to find the person he wants to spend the rest of his life with. The third song of the alubm, "Los Angeles ", is another prime example of blues that the Counting Crows love to use so much. Bringing out much of the loneliness of Adam Duritz in this song, it adds much driving emotion in the presentation of the albums lyrical concepts.

The next song, "Sundays" sets the tone for what is the majority of the rest of the album. It has a very dreamy chorus, and a small blues solo before the bridge that adds a lot of feeling to the already flowing song. The bass is constantly bumping along , that although simple, really provides the room for the guitar work and Adam's vocals. "Insignificant" is a very percussion driven song. The drums provide the tempo changes that allow for the guitars and bass to play 8th notes followed by some minor scale licks. The lyrics tend to suggest that Adam wants to feel a sense of belonging, but wanting to do it his own way. The final song on the "Saturday Nights" disc, is "Cowboys". This song is a very dynamic song to end the disc on. It also brought out a new lyrical element to the album. Borderline Scitzophrenia. Adam rambles on like he's having a conversation with you about "her".

Now to start disc two, "Sunday Mornings". The "Sunday Mornings" disc is more mellow then it's former, which gives it that reflective sober feel to the music. It starts off with "Washington Square", a very powerful tale of guess what? Loneliness. With the introduction of pianos to this album, "Washington Square" is the perfect opener for the second disc. It continues on with the songs "On Almost Any Sunday Morning" and "When I Dream of Michaelangelo" which both blend acoustic guitars, the harmonica, electric guitar, and banjos. The lyrical theme of loneliness continues on throughout these two songs as well. "Anyone But You" shows a light at the end of the tunnel for this lyrical depression, and it being that way by Adam saying "You think about anything you can, and I think about you." Now to me, the next song " You Can't Count On Me" is just a tad generic. It is by no means a bad song, it just feels like it wasn't the best that they could've done with the song. They make up for it however with the song "Le Ballet d'Or". A near perfect blend of western sounding acoustics, xylophones, triangles, and even (I believe) a timponi makes this a highlight off of "Sunday Mornings". The second to last song, is a piano ballad called " On A Tuesday In Amsterdam Long Ago" that is alright. It definitely holds true the emotion that has been present the whole album, but it feels like it is lacking something. The closer of the album is " Come Around ". Is a soft rock anthem that sums up perfectly the whole album. Blending both halves of the album, it closes the great piece of art that is "Saturday Nights and Sunday Mornings".

This album, I think, contends strongly with "August and Everything After" as their best album. Great emotion, great musicianship, and great lyrics make this album one of the best of 2008.


Reccomended Tracks:
Hanging Tree
Insignificant
Washington Square
La Ballet d'Or



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user ratings (85)
Chart.
3.6
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other reviews of this album
Mike Stagno EMERITUS (3.5)
A nice return to form for these Californian alt-rockers....


Comments:Add a Comment 
heyadam
April 10th 2010



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Sorry this is long, but I had a lot to cover! This is my second review so please help with more formatting and structure tips

heyadam
April 10th 2010



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

someone neg'd it

porch
April 10th 2010



8453 Comments


Really generic, uninteresting band. Decent review, i'll pos

heyadam
April 10th 2010



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Eh I disagree with you about that, but thanks for your opinion lol

atrink
Contributing Reviewer
April 10th 2010



2845 Comments


good review. but it would make it easier if you italicized song names or the band/album names

heyadam
April 10th 2010



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Alright will do man. Thanks, yeah I figured I probably should

DoubtGin
April 13th 2010



6749 Comments


Dunno about this band but you shouldnt do track-by-track reviews (although this basically wasnt one).. it feels a tad boring if you mention every song, describing it with one sentence (or two).

and the main body needs more flow (do u say it like that?)


I dont usually give criticism so I hope you got what I tried to say.

heyadam
April 13th 2010



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks man I did. Yeah I don't like obvious track by track reviews, but I like describing how each track contributes to the album. Especially since this album is a theme album, it kind of made sense to do it this way. Thanks for your suggestions though

Dryden
April 13th 2010



12928 Comments


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no thanks

heyadam
April 13th 2010



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

understandable. haha

Veganpunk
January 13th 2011



10 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

No way a contender to knock off August and Recovering as my favorite CC album, but still really good. These guys take way too long to put out albums, but when they do, it's worth it!

El_Goodo
January 20th 2011



1008 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Nice review man, Counting Crows will always be one of my favourite bands, they've led me to artists like Wilco and Ryan Adams (who actually co-wrote Los Angeles on this album). Calling them "generic & uninteresting" is just not true, Adam Duritz is one of our generations finest and yet most underrated lyricists, and the band is incredibly talented there basically our generations "The Band" listen to their live stuff to find proof of this.

heyadam
March 11th 2011



1708 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thanks man, Adam Duritz is such a great vocalist/lyrics. He sings with so much conviction

macadoolahicky
May 9th 2012



1835 Comments


Such a legit album



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