Deep Purple
Come Taste the Band


1.5
very poor

Review

by Matthijs van der Lee USER (219 Reviews)
November 12th, 2009 | 29 replies | 7,353 views


Release Date: 1975 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Deep Purple try to be even more funkeh!, but make their downfall.

5 of 6 thought this review was well written

Deep Purple: A Retrospective

Episode XI: Come Taste the Band

Ritchie Blackmore left Deep Purple on three separate occasions, and the first one of these was in 1975. Expressing disappointment with Mark III, the guitarist felt he needed something entirely new, rather than the two new members who had earlier barricaded Purple’s foundations. Together with the then-practically unknown Ronnie James Dio, Blackmore went on the form Rainbow, which would see varied amounts of success. As for Purple, they faced disbandment. However, David Coverdale requested Jon Lord to keep the band together, and eventually the empty guitar spot was filled by Tommy Bolin, who had a funk background, like Glenn Hughes. Mark IV had been formed, but wouldn’t last for very long either, as Bolin’s continuous drug abuse would lead to Purple’s downfall, and finally, their disbandment, until Mark II reunited in the mid-80’s. The line-up’s first and only album, Come Taste the Band, was released the same year Blackmore left.

Deep Purple Mk. IV was:

- David Coverdale ~ Lead Vocals
- Thomas Richard ‘Tommy’ Bolin ~ Lead Guitar, Vocals, Bass Guitar
- Glenn Hughes ~ Bass Guitar, Vocals
- Jon Douglas Lord ~ Organ, Piano, Synthesizer, Bass Guitar
- Ian Anderson Pace ~ Drums

I would be unfair to immediately bash the record based on Blackmore’s absence, and when listening to Purple’s 10th album, there is actually quite some decent material around. Due to Bolin’s funk background, the influence the genre has on the sound of the band became even greater, and sometimes, Come Taste the Band feels more funk rock than it does hard rock. The way it is probably best described, is the sound of Mark III with a strong amount of funkiness on top of it. That said, there is nothing at all particularly wrong with that approach, and it could have definite potential.

Bolin, having to replace on the quintessential 70’s rock guitarists, didn’t do all too shabby with those funky guitar lines of his. Most of the time they are indeed quite catchy, although simple, and form an adequate backbone for the song, as shown with the first two tracks Comin’ Home and Lady Luck. The mood is laid down correctly, as the funk remains throughout, though a slight touch of jazz in tracks such as Gettin’ Tighter and Drifter also makes an entry.

The most striking fact about the whole sound of the album is how much the band has changed. This is, not in miles and miles and miles, near the Deep Purple that created In Rock and Machine Head. It isn’t very surprising, of course, knowing that 3 members had been replaced since then, but it hasn’t only been an evolution in sound. Mark II was immensely creative, and reached completely new heights, even forming the shape of hard rock music when it was in its very development. Mark III was also capable of doing quite something, but by the time Mark IV came around, the spark seemed to have vanished. Has it left just with Blackmore? Perhaps. I like to believe it was a gradual process. Despite that the beginning of Come Taste the Band is not actually so poor, genericness makes its entrance all too soon. With titles such as I Need Love, this record doesn’t leave much to the imagination. Apart from a surprising break with the melancholic ballad This Time Around, which isn’t even that much of a standout, this album is simple funk followed by even more simple funk, and the true inspiration is nowhere to be found. Unfortunately, Deep Purple had been losing their true spark since Stormbringer.

There isn’t all that much that Come Taste the Band really can do. The tunes are fairly enjoyable, not badly performed, and Bolin gave it his best shot, but that is really about it. This album is the sound of a band that has lost almost every inch of its creativity, and that is a shame, for we know they can, and have done, far and far better. If you like straight-up old-fashioned funk, here’s your game. Don’t expect a Deep Purple record.

Recommended tracks:

Comin’ Home
...



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3.3
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JamieTwort CONTRIBUTOR (3.5)
One of the most underrated rock albums of the 70's...


Comments:Add a Comment 
Nagrarok
November 12th 2009



7966 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Music not good, cover not good, title not good.

That makes 70. If I keep going like this I'll hit 100 soon.

BigHans
November 12th 2009



26455 Comments


How about a Black Sabbath discography?

Nagrarok
November 12th 2009



7966 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Nah, Sabbath generally became generally boring after Heaven and Hell. But as I also handles eras, there are possibilites...

EVedder27
November 12th 2009



6088 Comments


happy 70th Nag. Pos'd.

MassiveAttack
November 12th 2009



2684 Comments


Awesome album name...haha

LepreCon
November 12th 2009



3544 Comments


Happy 70th, I'll probably only be getting this at some point to complete my collection

jpphoopha
October 14th 2010



4 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

A mediocre album with crappy guitar playing by a drug-addled loser trading on the reputation of a once great band.

linguist2011
Contributing Reviewer
September 23rd 2011



1780 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

I didn't think this was a bad album,but it had more funkiness than i could handle..

manosg
October 12th 2012



4713 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Overall, a good album which tends to be quite underrated. Nevertheless, Deep Purple was experiencing
an identity crisis since all their previous songwriters were replaced by the funky trio of Hughes,
Coverdale and Bolin.

My personal favorite is "You Keep on Moving" which was originally intended for the "Burn" album.

Digging: Jan Akkerman - Tabernakel

MrSirLordGentleman
February 14th 2013



2321 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

and here is where you leave aside Deep Purple and you thank God that Blackmore created Rainbow

Digging: Nektar - A Tab in the Ocean

Titan
February 23rd 2013



4799 Comments


damn, Dealer gets me dancin'

dannyboy89
March 31st 2013



8111 Comments


I find Bolin's guitar work to be quite good here. He's no Blackmore though, but he does a good job of filling in for him.

Digging: The Mothers of Invention - One Size Fits All

dannyboy89
March 31st 2013



8111 Comments


I might 4 this.

Antonius
April 12th 2013



184 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5 | Sound Off

Again you find me on your side regarding this album and pos'd for that. In 3 words: lack of chemistry

JamieTwort
Contributing Reviewer
May 2nd 2013



18277 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Such an underrated album. Might bump my rating.

Digging: Benoit Pioulard - Hymnal Remixes

SingingInTheRain
May 2nd 2013



65 Comments


No way is this good.

JamieTwort
Contributing Reviewer
May 2nd 2013



18277 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

It's great.

SingingInTheRain
May 2nd 2013



65 Comments


I'll check it.

JamieTwort
Contributing Reviewer
May 2nd 2013



18277 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Don't know why it gets so much hate on this site. It seems to get a bit more love on RYM.

SingingInTheRain
May 2nd 2013



65 Comments


I don't use RYM and only just started using this so I wouldn't know.



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