World's End Girlfriend
The Lie Lay Land


4.5
superb

Review

by Crimson USER (60 Reviews)
April 4th, 2009 | 31 replies | 11,539 views


Release Date: 2005 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Some of the most eerily beautiful and dynamically pleasing post-rock you're ever likely to hear.

3 of 3 thought this review was well written

World's End Girlfriend are a complete anomaly in the post-rock scene. The creator, Katsuhiko Maeda, lets all the traditional characteristics of the genre dissolve in his music, instead relying on creating his own brand of emotionally charged and electronically varied music define itself. Gone are the classic guitar arpeggio's that have become synonymous with the genre, so too the generic build-up to climax formula that plagues so many releases. There are no vocals, but emotional speaking samples are present in several places, giving the record a haunting and unique atmosphere. Orchestral and classical elements go hand in hand with electronic, and the result is one of extremely paradoxical but genuinely exciting success.

Indeed, this is post-rock like no other.

There are a huge variety of instruments in The Lie Lay Land, from your typical and expected guitars and keyboards to less traditional instruments like trumpets, violins, flutes and other classical instruments. These don't come in separately, instead sharing the stage in a puzzling and impressive way. The Lie Lay Land isn't traditionally beautiful, the melodies are often strange and haunting, and the constant array of different sounds and instruments can be daunting and overwhelming, but it is always breathtakingly pretty and pleasing in a bizarre way. Being pretty doesn't necessarily mean having a 'happy' atmosphere though, as is shown throughout the release where the mood changes to sometimes frightening, other times fearful and tense. It's a wonderfully varied and very pleasing way of keeping the entire album fresh throughout. Certain aspects of the sound can be likened to more traditional bands in the genre, like the opening of the simply enormous 'Scorpius Circus', but it is made so different by the inclusion of different electronic sounds and other instruments that it is barely recognisable to any other band in the genre.

Surrounding the entire record is a haunting ambience that refuses to let go of its grip on the quieter moments. The entirety of 'Song Cemetery' is amazingly simple and subdued, with an ambient backdrop being coupled with slow, rhythmic sounds and beautifully pretty singing from a young and quiet voice. Although remarkably simple and unchallenging, the song is incredibly easy to lose yourself in, and throughout the entirety of its three-and-a-half minute length you are completely sucked in. The song itself is quiet and almost threatens to be scarily distant, but ends up being so involving and atmospheric that it builds up the next song almost unbearably. The following track, 'Give Me Shadow, Put on My Crown' simply builds and builds upon what 'Song Cemetry' had created with more quiet distant singing and more startlingly beautiful ambience – but is coupled by an increasingly tense and explosive aura, which gets exploited with several explosions of sounds and climaxes within its beastly length. When a final climax in the song comes, something that the last fifteen minutes of music had been hinting at, it simply explodes, before the song itself finishes quietly, once again beginning to recreate the atmosphere and ambience.

Unlike most post-rock, a key strength of The Lie Lay Land is its variety, both instrumentally and dynamically. Whereas the aforementioned 'Song Cemetry'/'Give Me Shadow' combination built itself upon layers and layers of increasingly tense and almost eventually choking ambience, the oddly titled 'We Are The Massacre' is instead uplifting and glorious, with flutes and chimes throughout. Although they sound like polar opposites, it is nonetheless a familiar atmosphere and sound thanks to Katsuhiko Maeda craft and vision. His ability to blend electronics and orchestral themes together in such a way makes the sound instantly recognisable, which coupled with the haunting children's voices and whispers throughout the album make every song a similar but all together completely different journey into a twisted and beautiful place.

At nearly eighty minutes long, The Lie Lay Land is a monumental album. Filled with ambience, narrated throughout by eerily beautiful and somewhat haunting whispers from children, amazingly textured with many layers of paradoxical but stunning sounds, The Lie Lay Land is the realisation of something utterly startling and brilliantly personal. With such a unique sound all that World's End Girlfriend needed was a concept and an execution, The Lie Lay Land is conceptually brilliant and executed to perfection. If you've ever had a intensely long dream that shifts throughout a million different moods and feelings, then you've already come some way to knowing what this might sound like like.



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user ratings (90)
Chart.
4
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
Crimson
April 4th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

my favourite post-rock album.

oh yeah it's better than Kashiwa Daisuke.

Essence
April 4th 2009



3559 Comments


getting right now

Athom
Staff Reviewer
April 4th 2009



17117 Comments


i LOVE this. awesome review.

Digging: Sad Lovers and Giants - Feeding the Flame

joshuatree
Emeritus
April 4th 2009



3743 Comments


haven't heard this but hurtbreak wonderland is excellent

Crimson
April 4th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

hurtbreak wonderland is stunning and comes only slightly behind this with some simply amazing songs but doesn't feel as ambitious or emotional as this.

Liberi Fatali
Emeritus
April 4th 2009



1588 Comments


I wouldn't put either this or Hurtbreak Wonderland over Kashiwa Daisuke personally.

Essence
April 4th 2009



3559 Comments


What about his new stuff, though?

Crimson
April 4th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

i would (which you obviously know) but not by far, they're both amazing modern-classical/post-rock acts, its just that this seems a lot more focused and digestible than Kashiwa Daisuke.

also, his latest album was really, really boring.

This Message Edited On 04.04.09

Liberi Fatali
Emeritus
April 4th 2009



1588 Comments


Well Kashiwa's latest album is subpar, and I enjoy this album more. But Program Music and April #02 are sooooo sublime.

You say World's End Girlfriend is more digestible, but I've always found myself totally immersed in Kashiwa's work from the get go, with each repeated listen growing on me more.

Crimson
April 4th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

it might have something to do with the fact i found WEG first and have grown to adore this and Hurtbreak before listening to Kashiwa, i don't know.

i still haven't got April #02. reckon i need to get round to that.

Liberi Fatali
Emeritus
April 4th 2009



1588 Comments


I'm the opposite, found Kashiwa first hehe. =p

Yeah April #02 is class.
This Message Edited On 04.04.09

Liberi Fatali
Emeritus
April 4th 2009



1588 Comments


Did you apply for a contributer or staff position btw?

Crimson
April 4th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

nope, don't really have time, i already write for another website and i get sent cd's weekly there so yeah :/ it saps the inspiration a bit.

I just throw up the occasional personal find/favourite up here when i'm in the mood.

Liberi Fatali
Emeritus
April 4th 2009



1588 Comments


Ahh true true, fair enough. What other site do you write for out of curiosity?

This Message Edited On 04.04.09

Crimson
April 4th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

not a major one (sputnikmusic almost definitely has a bigger audience), a little known one called The Metal-Observer :D

as you can see from the title, it's quite genre specific, which gives me an excuse to throw up albums here that wouldn't quite fit on the site, heh.

This Message Edited On 04.05.09

Crimson
April 5th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

so yeah the website broke
bump

Willie
Moderator
April 5th 2009



15774 Comments


I read The Metal Observer. What name do you go by there?

Digging: Teramaze - Esoteric Symbolism

Crimson
April 5th 2009



1935 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Really? wow, I go by Raven, my real name, and a totally metuhl name at that.

Willie
Moderator
April 5th 2009



15774 Comments


Yeah I do read that site sometimes. I'll look for you now that I know. It is a cool name; same as Killing Joke's bass player (last name).

Essence
April 6th 2009



3559 Comments


that's a badass name



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