Faith No More
Who Cares a Lot?


4.5
superb

Review

by kygermo USER (20 Reviews)
September 23rd, 2008 | 13 replies


Release Date: 1998 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Probably the easiest way to get in FNM. Once you put this hits package to memory, go fishing for their official albums.

To be truthful, it's very difficult to review a greatest hits package, especially for a band I absolutely adore. This my new friends, is blow-for-blow my favorite band. While I hate having favorites, Faith No More is usually who I say when somebody asks who my favorite band is (and their reply is usually a nervous "Who?"). They seamlessly blend all sorts of music together to make a catchy, convincing body of work that still speaks to me (and many others) after so many years of listening. At 22 years of age, FNM broke up when I was a mere 12 years old, so they were certainly before my time. If I find myself going to the one of many Mike Patton-led bands' shows, I always ask the older in attendance if they saw the mighty Faith No More. One time a guy told me Mike Patton invited the entire audience on stage to watch them perform at The Tower theater in Philadelphia in 1995 during the King for A Day tour. I almost fainted. I remember seeing the ad in the paper about Faith No More's last Philadelphia appearance (September, Electric Factory, 1997), but I didn’t know who they were, or why it was sold out.

By chance in 1998, I was at a Flea Market and came across what is considered to be FNM's masterpiece, Angel Dust. I picked that up along with Prince's Graffiti Bridge for an awesome price of four dollars (yes I’m the guy writing all the Prince reviews, so what’s it to you? lol). I hated Angel Dust. My young ignorant mind was looking for that particular song I always heard on the radio (something about wanting it all and we cant have it?). Well, it wasn’t on there, so Angel Dust hibernated in my cd collection for the time being. By chance I got an offer from BMG Music to get eight free cds for the price of shipping. One of my choices was Who Cares A Lot? The Greatest Hits. For 13 years of age, it blew my mind. I had no idea FNM was so capable of making such astonishing, unheard of music. This compilation is without a doubt the perfect launching pad to get into the brilliant and severely underrated world of Faith No More.
The songs represented on this Hits package are fine examples of their fantastic albums. On average, about three songs each are chosen. Some songs could have been left off from each era in favor of others (and I wont mention what songs), and the Rhino-issued collection This is it is a bit better as that particular collection shows their off-kilter side a lot more clearly. Suffice to say this isn’t bad at all. It’s actually quite easy to digest, which was probably the point the whole time. To be fair, the songs chosen each have their own identity for their respected albums they were lifted from. For example, "Midlife Crisis" has that essence that Angel Dust brings, while "Digging The Grave", and "Last Cup Of Sorrow" are prime examples of how just about every band from the late 90s and early 00s have tried to steal from FNM (imagine how Korn felt when Mike Bordin agreed to play the drums for them on their 2000 tour, which I saw and Bordin was the first member of FNM I’ve seen live).

The second cd on this package is where the fans go wild. A mix of (FANTASTIC) outtakes, demos, and live tracks, this is the primary reason why the other seasoned fans would even buy this. Taken from the Angel Dust sessions and performed live in or around 1991, "The World is Yours" is one helluva listen. It has the infamous Bud Dwyer public suicide put in the middle of the song, with the sounds of an elephant thrown in for good measure. Up next is the ultimate summer song, "Hippie Jam Song", an unbelievably funky and groovin' track that truly shows off the beast of Billy Gould and Mike Bordin's solid rhythm unit. And of course, Roddy Bottum's organ. Some lyrics are worth mentioning too as Mike Patton is ever so good with double meanings ("That’s about as funny as a bake sale/Just about as boney as a butt cheek"). The next track dubbed "Instrumental" is a cool little tune as well, and I have a feeling it wasn’t meant to be an instrumental, but more or less something Patton forgot to put lyrics over. No worries, as it is a fun track. One thing that puzzles me is the next track up; "I Won't Forget You" was never released on King For A Day. By far their heaviest song, it makes even "Jizzlobber" sound tame. With another groovetastic rhythm, this track features no keyboards and an impressive vocal performance from Mike Patton. This is where Patton gets to shriek, and go insane on the microphone which is always entertaining, and intimidating.

The Introduce Yourself 4-Track demo is cool enough, but the quality slips for obvious reasons, and they sound uninspired. That’s ok though, I hold no grudges whatsoever. The next three tracks were taken from FNM's last appearance in Australia. These clips can easily be seen on Youtube, and they put on a great show. Track six starts with the Deep Purple classic "Highway Star", which is shortened and FNM'd out. Its fun, it means nothing, and leaves you with a smile on your face. Mission accomplished. Then of course up next is the loved "Midnight Cowboy", which strangely sounds like a band falling apart, as their demise was around the corner. Alas, we end with "This Guy's In Love With You", a Burt Bacharach staple that made its way on their set lists throughout 1997-98. A fantastic performance, Mike Patton even brings out the Mellotron and does a nifty little solo with the brilliant musicians backing him in such a magical way. I really can't say enough about this cover. Youtube it, it is absolutely worth it.

And so it ends. Faith No More broke up, and it breaks my heart to know I would never really get to see this band live. It’s funny to see how much they have caught on recently, mainly due to Mike Patton and his zany projects he does. It's disheartening to see Mikey Bordin play for Ozzy, when he could easily play for FNM and his talents could be put to use again. People are always curious about FNM, and they ask me about them all of the time. Usually I burn them a sic mix, and tell them to study. No lie, every person I’ve burned cds for, have loved them in return. I’ve even heard "Incubus has tried to be this band for so long, and they don’t even come close". Strangely, that’s kind of accurate. Regardless, Mike Patton has recently been kind to questions of a reunion, and I know of the other members agreeing to play once more. Life would be put on hold if this were to happen. I’ve read everywhere that the USA was indifferent to FNM at the time, but to hell with that, FNM has and still does matter to me. Ever so true is the quote "You don’t know how good something is until it's gone". Lucky for me, I wasn’t even old enough at that time to have the chance to either praise or ignore. But now, I hold them in such regard, and this package will do the trick to any person willing to see and feel what we have seen and felt for so long.



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user ratings (74)
Chart.
3.9
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
Willie
Moderator
September 23rd 2008


16149 Comments


I'd like to think I'm a big fan of this band, but then I realize that I only like The Real Thing and Angel Dust... but I really like those two albums.

Edit: And I like the review style you chose for this abum.This Message Edited On 09.23.08

Digging: Mors Principium Est - Dawn Of The 5th Era

Tyler
Emeritus
September 23rd 2008


7926 Comments


How can you not like King for a Day? That's arguably as good if not better than Angel Dust.

Willie
Moderator
September 23rd 2008


16149 Comments


I just never got into that one. I loved Angel Dust and King for a Day was just too different. Also, I've never liked the new riffing style on those albums (as much as I like Mr. Bungle).

fireaboveicebelow
September 23rd 2008


6837 Comments


good review, but greatest hits always seemed to me like the easy way out for being a 'fan', at least its like that around here

Willie
Moderator
September 23rd 2008


16149 Comments


What do you mean? ^^

fireaboveicebelow
September 23rd 2008


6837 Comments


for example this one girl I know buys a greatest hits of a band and she's all the sudden their biggest fan, but never buys the actual records, therefore never knows the best songs. tis sad, is allThis Message Edited On 09.23.08

Willie
Moderator
September 23rd 2008


16149 Comments


Oh. That makes sense. I was just confused.

Willie
Moderator
September 23rd 2008


16149 Comments


I'd never tell anyone to buy a greatest hits album.
I would. Generally greatest hits are a good place to start if you've never heard a band before; especially a band with albums as varied as Faith no More's. After you hear the songs from the various albums you can decide which ones you liked the most and start with that album.

Sound
September 23rd 2008


3904 Comments


Just like the other greatest hits album this is missing the title track from The Real Thing.

kygermo
September 23rd 2008


996 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Thats why I said this is arguably the easiest way to get into FNM. I clearly stated that 3 songs were each represented from their albums and its a fine choice.

With Faith No More, the curious would get a bit too confused since FNM never sticks with just one genre. Its alot to put their head around. With this hits package, its the easiest way since its nothing too difficult to like, or digest for that matter. And as amazing and awesome as FNM is, this is the "safest" approach.

And for somebody to recommend Angel Dust to another person who wants to get into FNM is too much. Angel Dust is too bizarre to the newbie. I learned that the hard way when I bought it for someone as a gift and they told me it was too complicated. So I burned them KFAD instead and they "got it" finally, and from there on went back to AD and loved it.

For FNM, use caution.

The Highway Star cover is pretty cool. Its only a buck n a half long, but Patton does a fine Ian Gillan. No jamming, pretty much verse-chorus. Worth hearing.

DaveBum69
September 23rd 2008


699 Comments


For some reason whenever I buy a greastest hits I don't listen to it ever, don't know why

kygermo
September 23rd 2008


996 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

^^...ok..

endlessartix
August 10th 2009


275 Comments


My start was The Real Thing, but I really didn't have any trouble getting into Angel Dust, it only took about 2 listens and I was hooked.



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