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Deaf Club

Deaf Club, a new band from Wales based in London, make connections between disparate genres of music you might not have considered putting together, but now that they do suddenly make sense. They flirt with or fluctuate between goth, shoegaze, chillwave and a rocked-up folk, and it all sounds seamless. The critics agree: "The brooding atmospheres and rising tensions that run deep through their songs are the sounds of a band packed with potential and huge ambition," wrote one.

We can only concur, especially with the bit about brooding atmospheres and rising tensions. And the b ...read more

Deaf Club, a new band from Wales based in London, make connections between disparate genres of music you might not have considered putting together, but now that they do suddenly make sense. They flirt with or fluctuate between goth, shoegaze, chillwave and a rocked-up folk, and it all sounds seamless. The critics agree: "The brooding atmospheres and rising tensions that run deep through their songs are the sounds of a band packed with potential and huge ambition," wrote one.

We can only concur, especially with the bit about brooding atmospheres and rising tensions. And the bit about being packed with potential and huge ambition. All of it, really. We'll take issue with "run deep" just to prove our acuity and refusal to be easily swayed. Deaf Club's debut EP, Lull, released last year and available now for free download from their Bandcamp, is a neat introduction, and by neat we mean swirling, grandiose and dark. Opening track Hana, which has earned attention from Radio 1 and 6 Music, makes good on the above promise by going heavily on the big, echoey drums (feel the rising tension!) and shimmery guitar (breathe the brooding atmosphere!). It's all headily reminiscent of goth, and immediately you are transported to the Batcave where the air is dense with lacquer and lugubrious devotion. Polly Mackey's voice is keenly post-Siouxsie, as all girls' voices in this area of music must always, by law, be, but there is a softness amid the stridency that, as we say, has elements of folk. She sounds distracted and disturbed, like a child who has seen too much. « hide


Lull
06/10/2012

4.3
3 Votes

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