Accept
The Rise of Chaos


4.0
excellent

Review

by PsychicChris USER (214 Reviews)
August 18th, 2017 | 6 replies


Release Date: 2017 | Tracklist

Review Summary: It’s amusing how an album called The Rise of Chaos is pretty exemplary of a band operating as orderly as Mussolini’s alleged train schedule

There is a difference between being caught in a rut and doing what you know you’re good at. I don’t really know the difference personally and I don’t think tired old dogs like AC/DC do either, but Accept sure does. Despite replacing lead guitarist Herman Frank and drummer Stefan Schwarzmann with Uwe Lulis and Christopher Williams respectively, Accept’s fifteenth studio album is a near carbon copy of every album that the Teutonic terror has released since 2010’s Blood of the Nations. Fortunately it’s really hard to dislike receiving more of the same when the band is so enthusiastic about presenting it.

As expected, The Rise of Chaos offers more of Accept’s distinct brand of classic speed metal with the same combination of energetic tempos, driven guitars and bass, and husky lead and backing vocals. If anything, the formula may be a little more simplified this time around. In contrast to the more melodic flavor on 2014’s Blind Rage, there’s more emphasis on the faster songs. The structures are also more basic and the lyrics may be blunter than they already were.

This is best demonstrated with the way the choruses are written, as they mostly stick to the band’s unique backing vocals punctuating certain phrases or song titles without as much expansion on their ideas. It’s not a serious deal breaker, as these lines are still fun to hear and the band’s energy keeps things from feeling tired, but the actual compositions aren’t as epic as the band clearly wants them to be.

There are still some pretty good songs on here, though. I never thought I’d say that a song called “Koolaid” would be the best on an Accept album, but it is a pretty rocking mid-tempo tune with some chilling lyrics showcasing a survivor’s narrative of the Jonestown Massacre. I also give props to “Analog Man,” another solid song that deals with the theme of feeling out of place in a more technologically savvy culture. Being one of those millennial types that these songs complain about, I like how the lyrics seem to be a personal lament rather than boasting superiority or antagonizing the world at large.

It’s amusing how an album called The Rise of Chaos is pretty exemplary of a band operating as orderly as Mussolini’s alleged train schedule. Classic metal fans that have followed Accept since they acquired Mark Tornillo will find more of what they loved about Stalingrad and the like, while those who weren’t convinced by previous efforts sure won’t be converted here. But while overthinkers like me may question the gradually diminishing returns of the songwriting, the fun factor keeps things from slipping into the doldrums. As long as the band keeps up the energy, this is a good niche for them to reside.

Highlights:
“Koolaid”
“Analog Man”
“Worlds Colliding”

Originally published at http://indymetalvault.com



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user ratings (47)
Chart.
3.2
good

Comments:Add a Comment 
BlackwaterPork
August 18th 2017


3855 Comments


Good god you do a lot of good reviews.

Digging: Run the Jewels - Run the Jewels 2

RippingCorpse1986
August 21st 2017


1613 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I think I like this album a little bit more than its predecessor Blind Rage. It took me by surprise when the band announced on their Facebook page that they would release new album this year. It can be said that The Rise of Chaos offers more of the same, of course, but like you say it's really hard to dislike that habit when the musicians offer good quality material like this. Also one thing's for sure, this album doesn't give the impression of a band on their last days. They still rock and compose energetic tracks.



My favorite songs are Die by the Sword, Hole in the Head, the title track, Analog Man and Race to Extinction. Great review, pos.

Digging: Inferi - Revenant

TheNotrap
September 17th 2017


8753 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

No Regrets is one of their best songs with Tornillo.

Digging: Slugdge - The Cosmic Cornucopia

vonseux
October 3rd 2017


284 Comments

Album Rating: 1.5

I find this album utterly stupid, long gone are the lyrics from Deaffy (Wolf's wife). The lyrics now are even worse than on Blind Rage. I don't even now wtf the songs are about, everything is generic and poorly written. "if you live by the sword, you die by the sword" uh, yeah? what's this song about?



The highlights on the review “Koolaid” and “Analog Man” are obnoxious. How many songs do we still need about Reverend Jim Jones? the chorus:"Don't drink the Koolaid Don't taste the holy water." that's plain dumb.

Analog Man only purpose is to really make clear there's a old gag writing this lyrics.



Don't get me wrong, I LOVE Blood of the Nations and Stalingrad; most songs there are about something (brave soldiers who sacrifice for their comrades and nation) and are well written. Wolf is the most skilled and inspired soloist in metal today, but that's not enough.



On Rise of Chaos the band is running on autopilot, Wolf Hoffman said in interviews they found the formula and will keep on it. They need to change producer ASAP or the next album the band is dead.

rockandmetaljunkie
February 20th 2018


7270 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Hoffmann is such a beast of a guitar player. Another solid lesson on proper metal guitar is delivered right here. Solid album overall.

rockandmetaljunkie
February 21st 2018


7270 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

analog man is a personal favorite, great song



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