Miles Davis
Ascenseur pour l'echafaud


4.5
superb

Review

by butcherboy USER (123 Reviews)
June 25th, 2017 | 44 replies


Release Date: 1958 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A lift to the scaffold..

It makes perfect sense that Miles Davis’ dysphoric brand of New York City bop conflated so well with the mannered noir sensibilities that the emerging French New Wave cinema was mining in the late 50’s. Grim and spare introspection was the rule of way, and dapper contemplation, however theatrical and put-upon, shaped the skeleton of every stock character that Nouvelle Vague would soon be overrun with; doe-eyed innocents, eloquent anti-heroes, hard-boiled roughnecks and femme fatales as far as the eye could see.

Tense, cabalistic and stylishly kitschy, Ascenseur pour l'échafaud made stars out of both director Louis Malle and his leading lady Jeanne Moreau. Today the film itself exists somewhere at a midway spot between an early entry point into the work of a soon-to-be formidable director, and a cult film of the inherently ‘bad’ pulp detective genre. The transcendent nature of Ascenseur pour l'échafaud has little to do with its banal plot and everything with how it depicted its heroes. Malle’s uncompromisingly unflattering physical portrait of the movie’s heroine sent French New Wave onto a path of determined realism, showing its characters to be as blemished on the outside as they were internally. The film’s intermissions from its main plot consisted of long, slow close-ups of Moreau’s face, lit up in all its human flaws by streetlights and café lanterns, every crease and asymmetrical twist on full display. It forged a new standard of pragmatism and all its underpinned philosophies, a standard that New Wave’s iconoclasts Godard and Truffaut would soon turn into a thriving scene. And behind every suspended still of existential humanity in Ascenseur pour l'échafaud was Davis’ moody trumpet.

Listening to Davis’ score outside the context of the film’s gloomy cityscapes lends the listener just as transporting an experience, and speaks to just how adroit and insular his compositions were already becoming at that point. He was still a year or so away from reuniting with Coltrane and Adderley to cut Milestones, a record that would send him on his first streak of masterpieces, one that would be capped off with the tender and patient Sketches of Spain. But his early conflagrations with his Quintet had already made a star and visionary of him, enough to be invited to shape the score of Ascenseur. Despite being recorded in Paris with a French session band, without Ascenseur as a pivotal point, the pieces themselves sound like most everything Davis was putting on record during that period. It’s a love letter to New York City at the turn of the decade; cracked pavement, Judy Garland cinema marquees and cigarette advertisements.

“Générique” starts off Ascenseur. Short and achingly elegant, it still stands as one of Davis’ finest early moments. From there, Ascenseur shifts in equal measure between dour slow burns (Au Bar du Petit Bac) and frantic hard bop bursts (Sur L’autoroute). It’s all as effortless and prodigious as Davis’ best. Very early forms of what would come to be known as ‘sheets of sound’ can be heard here. The playing mode, developed by Coltrane and Davis, first on Milestones, and the further fleshed-out on Soultrane, consisted of compressed improvisational displays of bent notes, shifting pitches and violent gliss. ‘Sheets of sound’ is rightfully attributed to Coltrane, as his late 50’s output would define the technique. But Davis’ hand in the process is difficult to disregard. His audible need to broaden sound and expand jazz discipline into singular, Pollock-like, un-replicable performances sits all over Ascenseur, and would soon be a driving force behind all of his work ethic.

Ascenseur circulates in several editions, some boasting all the variations Davis was trying for the score. And while the ad nauseam amount of takes can lend audiophiles and musicians an immersive look into Davis’ process, the record in its original 10-piece form is a taut marvel. Note for note, it effortlessly rubs shoulders with some of his most esteemed and enduring work. Along with the film it took its cues from, Ascenseur is a vital footnote in the history of one of the most fertile and invaluable periods of artistic innovation.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
butcherboy
June 25th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

all that jazzzzzzzzzzzzzz..

clavier
Staff Reviewer
June 25th 2017


848 Comments


your contributions to the back catalogues of sputnik are greatly appreciated

Digging: Feed Me Jack - Ultra Ego

butcherboy
June 25th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

cheers, Claire.. this one is near and dear to my little heart..

Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
June 25th 2017


18556 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

honestly think this is the best thing Miles did, though Dark Magus is up there

Digging: Avey Tare - Cows On Hourglass Pond

butcherboy
June 25th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

I think I agree in ways, just because of how economical and artfully depressive this record is.. though you have this at a 4, so I think our Davis views diverge a bit..

Sabrutin
June 25th 2017


5971 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Nice pick for a review, I was listening to this a few days ago. It's great, I can see why some would worship it

butcherboy
June 25th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

cheers, dude..

BMDrummer
June 25th 2017


14481 Comments


trumpet sound on this is crazy good

butcherboy
June 25th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

fuck yes it is!!

parksungjoon
June 25th 2017


9207 Comments


> honestly think this is the best thing Miles did

> Album Rating: 4.0



Frippertronics
Staff Reviewer
June 25th 2017


18556 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

thank you for clarifying

Divaman
June 25th 2017


3379 Comments


Curse you, butcherboy! You've made me actually want to listen to jazz.

Digging: John Boswell - Night Magic

butcherboy
June 26th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Diva, you may find yourself liking this.. before you know it, you'll be selling your stuff just to get that Charles Mingus hit..

zakalwe
June 26th 2017


26721 Comments


Jazz is a relatively new thing for me, purchased kind of blue for the fuck of it in 2010 and haven't looked back.

Digging: OLD - Formula

butcherboy
June 26th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

zaka, you need Mingus.. jazz' original punker.. meaty crazy arrangements.. as if captain beefheart and screamin jay Hawkins melded into one and started making bop music..

verdant
Staff Reviewer
June 26th 2017


2397 Comments


just getting into miles davis
eloquently written testimonies like this help ")

zakalwe
June 26th 2017


26721 Comments


Yeah I dig dude.
I have Sinner and Ah Um and love them both. Coltrane, Shorter, Coleman are all part of the collection and it all gets in the bones.
I massively appreciate the 'free reign' of it all and how it doesn't give the first fuck.
As a genre it's probably my most listened to at the min, I feel that the new stuff coming out now is still genuinely fresh and exciting.

butcherboy
June 26th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

cheers, Land.. you're standing at the cusp of a trove of amazing music..



zaka, that I'm slacking on.. give us a rec or two for contemporary jazz then, why don't ya?

zakalwe
June 26th 2017


26721 Comments


Ryan Blotnick - Kush
George Crowley - Can of Worms
Idris Ackamoor and the Pyramids - We Be All Africans
Binker and Moses - Journey to the Mountain of Forever
Hampshire&Foat - Galaxies Like Grains of Sand
Badbadnotgood - IV
Shabaka and the Ancestors - Wisdom of Elders

butcherboy
June 26th 2017


9464 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

nice.. thanks very much.. alternatively, we can star in a buddy cop comedy called Binker and Moses..



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