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Old 10-30-2008, 03:23 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by Soulfly666 View Post
As of now, I switched my major from Music to Finance, but I'm still out there playing. Currently I'm playing with the Latin Jazz Ensemble at my university, and I'm playing in a band outside of school. I play just as much as my music major friends, but the difference between them and myself is that when we're done with school, I won't have as hard of a time getting a job, and when I do get a job, the pay will be a hell of a lot more.

My 2˘.
you might play as much, but i doubt you practice as much since you have finance homework to do.
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Old 10-30-2008, 03:25 PM   #62
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I dunno. As a music student I find myself learning shitty heads I don't want to play, and learning piano solos I don't want to learn more than practicing the things I think I need to practice on guitar.
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Old 10-30-2008, 03:29 PM   #63
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honesty the big reason to go to college/uni for music is the faculty
if you're at a good school, the staff are busy as **** in the city, and when you get good they're a good source of work
I've gotten a handful of gigs from grad students and staff
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Old 10-31-2008, 01:58 AM   #64
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you might play as much, but i doubt you practice as much since you have finance homework to do.
I may not practice 8 hours a day, but I practice a whole lot more than I "practice" finance.
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Old 11-01-2008, 01:18 AM   #65
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Cool. Now name a single bass player who got a paying gig from a youtube video.
Okay you got me there smart guy.
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Old 11-02-2008, 02:48 AM   #66
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I'd say find a good university and just tell them you want to "learn to play the electric bass." If it's a place that you pay for your education as opposed to your classes, they may start a program just because you request it. That's what my brother did at Dillard.

If you can do this, you can get an education in something that matters and study your instrument. From there you can persue a career in music if you want to try that, and if it doesn't work out you'll have something to fall back on that will actually pay your bills.
Wait...what? Just telling a university that you want to learn to play electric bass, and they'll design a cirriculum for you just because you request it? That's thed most unrealistic idea I've ever heard.
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Old 11-02-2008, 01:12 PM   #67
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Wait...what? Just telling a university that you want to learn to play electric bass, and they'll design a cirriculum for you just because you request it? That's thed most unrealistic idea I've ever heard.
Then why did it happen? My brother is learning Jazz Guitar at a school that didn't have a program for it before he was there. Maybe it won't be in depth like what you'd get at a school just for music, but it can still happen.
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Old 11-02-2008, 02:14 PM   #68
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hey i wanted to learn jazz guitar so i designed my own program i didn't even need to go to college for:

charlie parker omnibook
transcribing solos and listening to a lot of ****
real books

cool huh
Aebersolds, and being born in 1940.
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Old 11-02-2008, 05:05 PM   #69
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i had to change my major mid-semester because there was NO placement rate for students certified in english and political science. nothing. so i changed to mathematics.

but lol who carez i lyke to play bas gunna go to musix schoolz
Anything more specific other than just mathematics? Are you looking to teach? What area of math are you majoring in?

I too am a math major but I'm looking to specialize in topology and number theory.
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Old 11-02-2008, 07:14 PM   #70
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what is topology and number theory
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Old 11-02-2008, 08:11 PM   #71
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Oh God, there is so much involved in each one. Topology is the study of a space and number theory is analysis of properties of numbers.




...Wow.That was absolutely a terrible explanation. I'm sure WikiPedia would be much more helpful in answering.
EDITs:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topology
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_theory


I can safely say that I'm not too terribly knowledgeable on everything involved in each category, but then again, I don't think I could define algebra, calculus, or geometry in a few sentences either. Of the bits and pieces I've read about course offerings at MIT and ASU, I believe these are the two areas of mathematics that most interest me.

Topology is quite similar to geometry, except it doesn't concern finite distances so much as it focuses on shapes, ratios, and functions that define the shapes. The book The Poincaré Conjecture discusses topology quite exclusively as it pertains to our ever expanding universe.

Number Theory interests me because I have a reasonably difficult time applying mathematical concepts. It just wasn't my thing. We discuss kinematics in physics and instantly my buddy Tom can take these simple algebraic equations and translate all of it into complex spacial vector calculus. Number Theory looks at things like the prime number theorem, the number zero, pi, e, Phi/phi, etc., and breaks it all down. Importance of numbers and their applications in other indefinite mathematics intrigues me.

I'm on the lookout for a couple of classes on sacred geometry also, but I haven't found any...yet.
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Old 11-02-2008, 09:24 PM   #72
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Topology is way cool.

EDIT: If you think you want to get into mathematics and just want to do music on the side, just know that advanced music theory becomes INTENSELY mathematical. Schillinger's theory of rhythm and harmony are pretty intensely pattern based (problems of voice-leading are "solved", for instance, with equations), and if you want to get into the Serial ****, musical set theory is a good place to get all mathematical.

Last edited by HaVIC5; 11-02-2008 at 09:27 PM.
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Old 11-02-2008, 10:39 PM   #73
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I'd look into psychoacoustics too.
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Old 11-02-2008, 10:47 PM   #74
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Have you read Hubert Howe's book on psychoacoustics?

Can't remember what it's called, have it at home somewhere.
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Old 11-03-2008, 03:03 AM   #75
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Have you read Hubert Howe's book on psychoacoustics?

Can't remember what it's called, have it at home somewhere.
Nope, name rings a bell though
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Old 11-08-2008, 06:24 PM   #76
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Well it isn't totally on psycho acoustics.

It's called Electronic Music Synthesis.

It's so unread they didn't even have it on the shelves at the library, it was down in the basement with all the other tl;dr books.
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Old 11-11-2008, 06:22 PM   #77
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Which is? As far as music majors go, Berklee DEFINITELY has the most specific of any of them out there in the contemporary music field. If you can name one with more options, I'll give you not one, but two cookies.
North Texas is a better school for jazz.
New School is a better school for jazz.
Loyola is a better school for jazz.


Now I never argued that any of these school have more options, but they are more focused in the ones they do provide.

Believe it or not other schools have better bass instructors, such as Frost School of music in Miami has Don Coffman, MTSU has Jim Ferguson, North Texas has Lynn Seaton and all of those schools are close to all around better jazz scenes than Boston.

Now in general berklee is a fantastic school, the student environment is great, and you have lots of great teachers, but it is certainly not the end all school that many people pay loads of money to attend.
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Old 11-12-2008, 11:58 PM   #78
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Believe it or not other schools have better bass instructors, such as Frost School of music in Miami has Don Coffman, MTSU has Jim Ferguson, North Texas has Lynn Seaton and all of those schools are close to all around better jazz scenes than Boston.
Matt Garrison? Esperanza Spalding? Lincoln Goines?

But that's irrelevant anyway. I don't go to Berklee for bass. You'll learn a lot, though.

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If you want to study jazz, there are better places to go, and there are places more specific for your area of study.
Quote:
Now I never argued that any of these school have more options, but they are more focused in the ones they do provide.
I guess I misunderstood you, and as far as dingdingaling jazz goes, sure, there are other schools that are be better. However, I will say this. I know very few other schools that offer a degree in "jazz composition", and those that do pale in comparison to Berklee's program. The jazz composition classes of most other schools use textbooks that Berklee staff wrote. (Arranging for Large Jazz Ensemble and Modern Jazz Voicings were both co-wrote by my current teacher for jazz counterpoint). Herb Pomeroy, one of the great jazz educators, was among the first to really create a curriculum out of advanced jazz arranging, and his techniques and methods are at the core of the curriculum at Berklee and elsewhere today.
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Old 11-13-2008, 04:52 PM   #79
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Matt Garrison? Esperanza Spalding? Lincoln Goines?

But that's irrelevant anyway. I don't go to Berklee for bass. You'll learn a lot, though.


I'm familiar with those instructors, Esperanza especially, but those teachers I named are honestly better at upright bass and electric in jazz.

Quote:
I guess I misunderstood you, and as far as dingdingaling jazz goes, sure, there are other schools that are be better. However, I will say this. I know very few other schools that offer a degree in "jazz composition", and those that do pale in comparison to Berklee's program. The jazz composition classes of most other schools use textbooks that Berklee staff wrote. (Arranging for Large Jazz Ensemble and Modern Jazz Voicings were both co-wrote by my current teacher for jazz counterpoint). Herb Pomeroy, one of the great jazz educators, was among the first to really create a curriculum out of advanced jazz arranging, and his techniques and methods are at the core of the curriculum at Berklee and elsewhere today.
Yes berklee has the best jazz composition class out there. New School is good if you want to play, North Texas has a great scene and a great overall jazz experience. Other schools foray in jazz but obviously don't delve as deep as music schools. But like I said eariler it depends on what you want to do with bass or music in general that determines whats the best option for you. (duh)
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Old 11-13-2008, 05:23 PM   #80
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yeah everyone thinks their school is the best and people who have never taken a music course in their life always seem to be the experts soooooooo
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Old 11-13-2008, 05:24 PM   #81
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I do not think my school is the best.
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Old 11-13-2008, 05:25 PM   #82
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I was kinda speaking generally
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Old 11-13-2008, 05:49 PM   #83
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zing
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Old 11-13-2008, 09:26 PM   #84
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no my school is the best
this
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Old 11-13-2008, 09:43 PM   #85
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It's hard to say if one school is better than the other. It's really up to what you do with yourself. Sure, it helps having renowned teachers, star studded alumni, and a good reputation, but people drop out of Berklee all the time, and there are musicians at all these places that are not much to write home about.

You can't say North Texas or Loyola or New School are better than Berklee. I know people from all those places of varying caliber as musicians. That said, I find that Berklee has given me a more solid background in harmony, arranging, and aural skills than the people I know from other schools like North Texas, which is often compared to Berklee.

Playing is different. You can get good as a player most places, in my opinion.
Actually the music scene around has the biggest effect on the musician, and new york city has a better jazz scene, they only thing you can't judge a school on is performance majors, which is what you use the city to judge, and New School offers students great opportunities to play in clubs that are other wise hard to get into. No matter where you go if you are going to do performance the people will want to hear you play before they sign you or anything, but if you do arranging or production or something, yes, some schools are better than others. For me its not about what school I go to its about what scene I get close to.

As for bias I show no bias towards any school, and the only thing I'm arguing is that New School is BETTER for a Jazz studies/performance major cause that is just a fact, that doesn't mean that the player is incredible or anything. And trust me I know too many garbage players who got into berklee and dropped out after one semester.

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Old 11-13-2008, 10:04 PM   #86
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yeah being in a good scene gets you heard, but you can become a good musician regardless

alabama lol


idk i shouldn't be arguing about jazz anyway although i love jazz i don't often work in it anymore because i feel it's not a great vehicle and has turned into more of high society entertainment in recent times maybe the future will prove better
Yeah jazz is one of those genres that people don't seem to understand anymore. The players, what it means, anything about it really. I remember on this site I had an arguement because people were like "gigs do not equal skill", where in the jazz world your number of gigs is actually usually represented by skill, being a number one call guy means you're the best. You can call musicians to the stand with no prior rehearsal. I realized later the misunderstanding, because I play in a couple of rock/punkish bands and in genres such as that it doesn't matter if you get a gig because bars will "hire" you pretty much no matter what.

As far as scene goes, contacts are crucial for jazz. And getting to go to school in new york and building up your contacts and making your way up while getting to go back to a dorm would probably be a pretty awesome feeling.

Yeah, alabama sucks, I'm in Birmingham, which isn't a bad city to start playing in cause you can get a lot of experience and nobody is muscling for gigs down here, but I'm already one of the top call bassists and Im 17 and that is not a good thing at all.

And yes jazz music in general has lost any image with the general public, people think of bowties and "In the mood" when they think of jazz nowadays completely disregarding any of the better parts of the genre simply by shutting off their ears.
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Old 11-14-2008, 02:38 PM   #87
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The Toronto jazz scene is growing (slowly). Lots of young musicians around, starting to book their own gigs and there's almost always something happening, somewhere. It's cool.
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Old 11-15-2008, 04:22 PM   #88
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Matt Garrison? Esperanza Spalding? Lincoln Goines?
Matt Garrison and Esperanza Spaulding are horrible teachers. Fantastic players, nice people, horrible teachers. and neither of them are really at berklee any more.

Lincoln is a great teacher and a very good player. so is John Lockwood, Bruce Gertz, and Oscar Stagnaro.
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Old 11-16-2008, 02:58 AM   #89
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Matt Garrison and Esperanza Spaulding are horrible teachers. Fantastic players, nice people, horrible teachers. and neither of them are really at berklee any more.

Lincoln is a great teacher and a very good player. so is John Lockwood, Bruce Gertz, and Oscar Stagnaro.
you forgot some,
vitti, buda, huergo, and clark
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Old 11-16-2008, 09:46 AM   #90
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you forgot some,
vitti, buda, huergo, and clark
you forgot more
jim Stinette, joe santare, paul de nero, barry smith, rich appleman, john repucci, Whit Browne, Ed Lucie, Greg Mooter, and Daniel Morris
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