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50-31 | 30-11 | EPs10-1

30. Artificial Brain – Infrared Horizon
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I’ve always accused death metal for feeling very artificial and forced as a genre, what with all its highly intricate guitar-wankery and lofty themes. So it’s quite funny that my favourite death metal outfit is a tech-death sci-fi influenced group who play some highly intricate guitar wankery; although, to be fair, what attracts me to Artificial Brain is the very specific sort of guitar wankery they do. There are no overindulgent leads here or pointless fretboard masturbation. Instead, you are treated to some of the sharpest bursts of dissonance and non-human textures your ears will be graced by outside of Gorguts and some of the better metalcore groups of the ’90s. Infrared Horizon is thick and cavernous, reverberating through hollowed out space-freighters infested by machines painfully aware of their newfound consciousness, gurgling with cold automatic rage. There is no humanity here, just indifferent, relentless dissonance. –Mort.

29. Vince Staples – Big Fish Theory
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28. Perfume Genius – No Shape
Perfume Genius - No Shape

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The music of Perfume Genius has always been dominated by anguish. Even as Mike Hadreas moved towards poppier sounds on records like Too Bright, the music’s mood was bittersweet at its most optimistic. That all changes with No Shape, Mike’s most sonically grandiose and lyrically self-affirming effort yet. Hearing songs like “Slip Away”, “Just Like Love”, and “Alan” from the same person behind songs like “Mr. Peterson” and “17” is a sign of how much Hadreas has grown as an artist. Mike has finally reached the light at the end of the tunnel, and its radiance could not be more gratifying. –wtferrothorn

27. ’68 – Two Parts Viper
'68 - Two Parts Viper

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Josh Scogin probably mastered the art of making his audience want to pummel each other within an inch of their lives years ago. I’m not entirely sure what he’s getting at anymore, really. By this point in his career, all his fans should be long dead, and yet he’s insistent the windmills and wife beaters make a return. The anthemic brutality of Two Parts Viper is honestly absurd; my dreams of seeing Scogin live have been tainted somewhat by just how damaging a pit for a track like “Whether Terrified or Unafraid” could be to my weak body. Garage rocking, noise-loaded sludge riffery, intoxicated vocals and a complete disregard for safety regulations make for an album that is just as memorable as it is energized. I have no doubts Scogin will be back in a few years notching the noise up a notch, and that terrifies me. This record is a workout and a half. –cryptologous

26. The Smith Street Band – More Scared of You Than You Are of Me
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Between you and me, I think Wil Wagner is putting it on. I’m aware that he’s sad and struggling, and I respect that he’s sad and struggling, and I want nothing more for him to not be sad and struggling, but this record’s most genuine moments rise above his wallowing. Take a Laura Stevenson feature on “Run Into the World” – the album’s turning point, or one of a few epiphanies scattered throughout the runtime. Meanwhile, “Suffer”‘s chorus (“If it’s all you look for, you will always find the dark”) doesn’t preach; it’s Wagner’s own little mantra – one he perhaps takes too literally at some points, but it’s a side to him we don’t see enough. I’d rather have this Smithies – angrier and more dogmatic – over the one that’s willing to watch Wil perpetually teeter between self-loathing and self-pity. –verdant

25. Iglooghost – Neō Wax Bloom
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[Soundcloud] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Neo Wax Bloom is a hyperactive mess, but in the best possible way. Imagine EP-era SOPHIE finding herself in the UK drum-n-bass scene of the late ’90s, apply some Squarepusher-esque schizophrenic, cluttered glitch, and then arrange it with a disarming sense of melody, and you’re only half-way there. Streaks of video-game influenced adrenaline, luscious, wavy pads, and sharp synthesizers drive through the heart of this adorably wonky record, and to consider this precocious talent is only on album number one is something to be truly excited for. While this record is not perfect, it is an unexpected gem, hinting at a devastatingly bright future for the young Irish producer. Just don’t expect to be able to sit still during consumption. –MercuryToHell

24. Chelsea Wolfe – Hiss Spun
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

No one can say they didn’t see it coming, but watching Chelsea Wolfe complete her gradual, five-album transformation from gothic folk artist to full-fledged metal musician was nothing short of exhilarating. But Chelsea Wolfe doesn’t really approach the ramped-up metal elements on Hiss Spun as a culmination; rather, she’s simply added them to her sonic toolbox as yet more chemicals with which to experiment. Accordingly, Wolfe’s heaviest album yet also includes some of her best work. “Offering” deftly blends subtle industrial percussion with lush guitar work. A guest spot from Aaron Turner on “Vex” enhances Wolfe’s devastatingly apocalyptic tone. “Twin Fawn” is an absolutely masterful study in contrast, the sparse, tiptoeing verses exploding into thrilling start-stop choruses. Even the simple, accessible “16 Psyche” is still as nuanced and emotionally resonant as one should expect from Wolfe. Hiss Spun might be the end of one transformation, but Wolfe makes it clear that she isn’t done growing and exploring, and we should all be excited about the next metamorphosis she decides to undergo. –hesperus

23. Slowdive – Slowdive
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Returning on the heels of My Bloody Valentine and Lush, Slowdive’s first full-length since the ambient pop masterpiece Pygmalion justifies their return after such a lengthy hiatus. It comfortably cements its creators’ legacy whilst more or less encouraging them to expand upon their newfound success beyond the now-familiar blueprint that 1993’s Souvlaki laid out all those years ago, when their ethereal, hushed sound it contained sounded unique. Although, in this case, their dependence upon that classic sound doesn’t necessarily leave Slowdive creatively barren, but far less innovative than they had been before. For every song that finds the band in sync with one another, there was also a fair amount of uninteresting material that had somehow found its way to the final cut, presenting fans with a creatively mixed bag that doesn’t progress from their past albums, but doesn’t go off-the-wall and completely ruin their legacy a la Swervedriver. It’s weird, because while it’s incredible to have a band like Slowdive back, it’s even more unsettling to find they still sound the same as they did back in the day. Does this benefit Slowdive? Not really, but provided they decide to stop playing it safe with any prospective records-to-be, Slowdive certainly have another classic in them that can be compared to Souvlaki or Pygmalion–Frippertronics

22. Protomartyr – Relatives In Descent
Protomartyr - Relatives In Descent

[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

As implosive as they are casually post-apocalyptic, Detroit post-punkers Protomartyr continue their multi-act play about the Western World’s internal dissolution. With each new release, they’ve grown angrier and somehow more resigned, and their music has gone through a similar regiment of passionate maturity. Relatives in Descent is a picture of great fiery scope being distilled through a pin-prick prism, turning its loudest moments into sledgehammers, and its quietest, most ruminating parts into gutting knives. The working class unrest and solidarity that becomes hammy pandering in the hands of most artists is a charred mobilizing chant from Casey Joe and company. Adding to their sound that’s gotten bigger, darker and more vexed is the fact that Protomartyr handle their political calls with intelligent nuance, never collapsing into sanctimony or didactics. Relatives unravels the way a pastoral novel would, rich depictions of barren landscapes, coated in abrasive atmospherics and searing guitars. Still and perhaps best of all, there’s faint hope there somewhere in Protomartyr’s vision and their ragged sermons from the furnace. –butcherboy

21. The War On Drugs – A Deeper Understanding
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Far from a champion of risk-taking (this thing is safer than Ichiro Suzuki running to first), and stubborn in their unflinching endorsement of the strong 4/4 beat, it’s dangerously easy to think of A Deeper Understanding as a step-down from 2014’s Lost in the Dream. But as the old adage goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” and what we have is another very lovely hour of slightly hazy, vocal-driven heartland rock stompers (“Up All Night”, “Holding On”, the excellent “In Chains”) and slower, softer numbers. It’s hard to not think of Adam Granduciel sat down in an armchair through this, his weathered croon and reflective, thoughtful lyrics bonding to form the air of storyteller as well as frontman. The livelier tracks certainly linger in the mind more, and “Knocked Down” in particular feels a bit lost between the dramatic wash of “Strangest Things” and the energy of “Nothing to Find”, but the album’s biggest strength – and possibly, its most frustrating stumbling block – is the outstanding 11-minute centrepiece, “Thinking of a Place”. Outstandingly composed and brilliantly emotive, it’s almost certainly TWOD’s best work and arguably one of the finest songs this decade – and as a result, it’s easy to dismiss the rest of the album in comparison. Approached correctly though, A Deeper Understanding has the potential to be every bit as charming as Lost in the Dream–Archelirion

20. BROCKHAMPTON – SATURATION
Brockhampton-Saturation1 copy

[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

A collective like BROCKHAMPTON could not exist, let alone thrive, in any time but now. They came into the public consciousness less than a year ago with more than a dozen members, no major label, and nothing but a Viceland show to make a group that large marketable. Flash forward to the end of 2017 and they have a dedicated fanbase, three records released and an idiosyncratic sound that has got them where they are now.

It all started here. A lot of these things people know BROCKHAMPTON for are all familiar now, but when SATURATION reached people for the first time, it was fresh combination of impeccably written hooks and verses, seamless chemistry between every member and creative production with a pop appeal. But it is their willingness to experiment with these qualities at their disposal that made them one of the most interesting rising artists of 2017. –wtferrothorn

19. Amenra – Mass VI
Amenra - Mass VI

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I was needlessly apprehensive about Mass VI. I had no real reason to be. Part of me wonders if the prying Amenra do into circles of human morality and spirituality with their themes and lyrical content was possibly encroaching on my subconscious like mold on unfortunate perishable goods. If there was a legitimate reason to be nervous, it has long since been thrown to the dogs; this album is a walking cataclysm. There’s a sense of jarring seasonality beneath the sludge-laden chaos. A time for eerie calm and a time for relentless riffs. A time for soaring melodies and a time for raucous thundering. The uncertain motif that carries “A Solitary Reign” quietly expresses solidarity for a brighter tomorrow as the song leaps from extreme to extreme. Earth quivers underfoot as the aura of an impassioned, tectonic behemoth of a bassline forces “Diaken” into deadly territory. Amenra conduct themselves with incredible tact given the barbaric highs of this release, and I’m afraid the calamitous nature of its stretch has rendered me docile. It’d be perjury to claim Mass VI as anything less than an achievement. The destruction inflicted might have turned this act pyrrhic, but a victory is a victory. –cryptologous

18. Elder (USA-MA) – Reflections of a Floating World
Elder (USA-MA) - Reflections Of A Floating World

[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Elder graced us this year with an ethereal monolith of an album, seemingly carved out of a slab of concrete with an equal amount of muscle and grace. The ever-evolving song structures seem to coalesce and fuse into stark landscapes of apocalyptic ruin, and yet seem just as interested in the hopeful chirp of wildlife and branching foliage that naturally springs from the wreckage. It’s a sure thing that anyone will have their own interpretation of just what to make of the soundscapes presented here, but I can only attest to my own. And while this may have been my first experience with the band, it most certainly won’t be the last. –neekafat

17. Mastodon – Emperor of Sand
Mastodon - Emperor Of Sand copy

[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Continuing on the natural trajectory set by Once More ‘Round the Sun, Mastodon returned this year with a rhythmic bounce in their step and catchy melodies on the mind. Lead single “Sultan’s Curse” emerged in a bridal display of something old, new, borrowed and blue; although the quartet swooned at the altar perfumed in almost every pungent era of Mastodon’s evolution, it was with fervent ejaculations of “I do” aimed in the direction of their more recent hard-rock agenda that they sealed the deal. Even so, many fans speculated a return to pre-The Hunter form might still be in the cards, but it simply wasn’t to be, with early tracks such as “Show Yourself” wasting no time dispelling any illusions of that ilk and the remainder of the album obediently following suit. Instead, Emperor of Sand offers a rocking, groovy, chorus-driven experience dressed up in the classic Mastodon identity, and as usual, the boys manage to deliver something impressive regardless of the style they package it in. There’s a lot to love in this slightly poppy incarnation of the sludge giants, and so long as the quality and energy remains consistently high, I see no cause to lament the smooth transition away from their darker roots into more relaxed territory. –ScuroFantasma

16. King Krule – The OOZ
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

I, perhaps stupidly, definitely instinctively, described THE OOZ to a friend the other day as “street-jazz”. Who knows, the convergence of two worlds seems to delineate a disconnect, or at least a nonchalance, to the harrowing things hiding behind the bar, at the bottom of a pint glass, in the kinetic energy of a balled-up and drunken fist. I don’t think Archie Marshall is trying to break free from the titular “ooz” here — rather, he is the ooz, ambling slowly about town during tracks like “Lonely Blue” and “Emergency Blimp”, briefly passing by side characters and b-plots, familiarising himself with their narratives, and coming away with a detailed collage of the underground. In The OOZ, we’ve found a new place to drown. –verdant

15. Ulver – The Assassination of Julius Caesar
3. Ulver - The Assassination of Julius Caesarjpg

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I’d never thought I’d see the day an Ulver album would have me shaking my ass, but since the release of The Assassination of Julius Caesar I’ve seen many. It’s an art pop album that only Ulver could make: it’s cerebral, textural, and progressive. It travels back thirty years, grabs new wave, gothic, and alternative and then jettisons it 100 years into the future. “Rolling Stone” is the best example. Close your eyes and the pulsating bass, electronic drums, and earworm chorus wouldn’t sound out of place in some grimy Manhattan club during the ’80s. Whether it’s the 1980s or 2080 is yet to be seen. As the song progresses, so do the oddities and modulating core melodies, disintegrating the once palatable harmonies into a futuristic static. Despite the sublime dichotomy of a new take on old sounds, Kristoffer easily shines as the album’s brightest star. Whether it’s the casual indifference he portrays in opener “Nemoralia” or the soaring runs on “Angelus Novas”, he’s settled so comfortably in the forefront it makes you wonder why it took so long to put him there. Ulver have done it all. Black metal? Check. Folk? Nailed it. Ambient? BOI! And now with The Assassination of Julius Caesar, Ulver can add art pop to the list of things they do better than anyone else. –TheSpirit

14. Fleet Foxes – Crack-Up
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There’s always been something wholesome and dependable about Fleet Foxes, a faux rustic act not dissimilar to your cosy Band of Horses or Iron & Wines. Say their name and it’s the homespun ‘n honeyed harmonies of songs like “White Winter Hymnal” that immediately spring to mind. In recent years, whenever I found myself stumbling into the slightly discomfiting surrounds of a craft beer emporium or rugged outdoorsy clothing shack, it was these likely lads who I’d anticipate coming on over the sound system. Which is to say that, if Fleet Foxes weren’t exactly your bag, then for sure they’d likely end up filed away under the label ‘Bands You Respect Rather than Love’. Well blow me down and cut the socks away from under my shoes if these creatures of habit didn’t just throw all caution to the fir-scented breeze and release the riskiest album you could’ve ever imagined them dropping in 2017. The appropriately titled Crack-Up is a work crammed chock-full with maze-like structures, musical riddles and abstract lyrical trails… and it’s also easily the most magical music Fleet Foxes have recorded to date. If the album doesn’t quite scale the heights of ‘best of the year’, then it should at least scoop up the award for ‘most welcome musical reinvention’. –DoofusWainwright

13. BROCKHAMPTON – SATURATION II
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

After I listened to their debut mixtape All-American Trash, I clearly remember cataloging the group as an artist to watch out for in the back of my mind, despite the many flaws riddled throughout the identity-less mess of an album. Three Saturations later and I don’t have to elaborate on the cult following that spawned out of the group’s insane work ethic and intoxicating energy. It’s also safe to say that II was the best attempt of the three as it features the most hectic bangers (“Gummy”, “Queer”, and “Junky”) and the highest amount of experimentation (“Fight” and “Tokyo”). Plus, the singles stayed true to their almost-radio worthy catchiness, making tracks like “Sweet” the anthem for any ‘edgy’ college party. Their unashamed rip-offs of almost every popular, indie genre somehow coexist pleasantly on here, despite the inherent clichés. It just goes to show that collaboration inspires incredible output, and judging by the 14-person work environment and 48+ song yield seen this past year, BROCKHAMPTON would argue that more is, well, more. –Conmaniac

12. Glassjaw – Material Control
Glassjaw-Material-Control-album-cover

[Soundcloud] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

With all that Material Control had to contend with, it’s an album that proves, once again, why Glassjaw are – and always have been – a cut above the competition. Fifteen years of waiting for a follow-up to Worship and Tribute and the band dropped the unthinkable out of the blue, leaving little room for preconceptions or to, indeed, anticipate what’s to come. And in all honestly, if you had been out of the game this long or thrown in the towel after releasing a milestone record like Worship and Tribute, a return to the fold with these kinds of factors could have made for a recipe destined for disaster and/or disappointment. But these guys aren’t your typical band; there’s a reason why their relevancy hasn’t diminished one iota in 15 years. By defying the obvious obstacles, they’ve released one of the most abrasive, face-pummelling and enjoyable post-hardcore records of 2017: an LP that celebrates and embodies everything they are while integrating more influence from their peers to seep onto Material Control‘s tracks. A little more one-dimensional when compared to previous works, but you’ll have a job finding Glassjaw sounding as cut-throat and dangerous as they do here. –DrGonzo1937

11. Tyler, The Creator – Flower Boy
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[Official Site] // [Spotify] // [Facebook]

Flower Boy, alternatively slapped with the prefix Scum Fuck, is my first experience with Tyler, but due to how much I personally enjoyed this album it currently isn’t my only one and certainly will not be the last. I won’t pretend to understand the artist’s journey up to this point, though it’s surely significant, and much like the sparsely decorated digipak housing the physical copy, I won’t dress this blurb up with allusions to external goings-on. What I can say is that Tyler has certainly embraced his title as a — no, as the Creator. The events that unfold herein are clearly very personal, often dealing with introspective and emotional subjects handled with a decidedly thoughtful touch. The result is a very intimate, authentic record, and though there’s some delicious bangers here rhetorically asking “Who Dat Boy”, they’re ‘answered’ with a complementary bowl of subdued mash… if I can get away with that punaphor. Before I’m demoted for abusing language and good taste like that, I will conclude by imparting that Flower Boy is a very deliberate, surprisingly delicate album, and I for one am excited to see where Tyler will choose to go from here on the back of such a mature album. –ScuroFantasma

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Jom
01.10.18
A list in which Papa Universe can finally enjoy his day because it's an intersection of two of his favorite things from 2017: Protomartyr w/ butcherboy.

Mort.
01.10.18
nice list. the brockhampton should surprise no one

Ovrot
01.10.18
elder so good doesn't need a write up i guess

SowingSeason
01.10.18
"elder so good doesn't need a write up i guess"
yeah let's go with that

Papa Universe
01.10.18
Protomartyr on 22 and butcherbabe writing the blurb.
Not gonna lie, I teared up.

Piglet
01.10.18
this list is so much better than staff's :')

Papa Universe
01.10.18
[2]

Demon of the Fall
01.10.18
Can anyone guess what the top 10 is before it's revealed?

verdant
01.10.18
unique has an alert on his phone for whenever butcher goes for his morning ablutions

Papa Universe
01.10.18
Who's Unique?

verdant
01.10.18
no one, we're all just variations of the same genetic code

SpiritCrusher2
01.10.18
"Can anyone guess what the top 10 is before it's revealed?"

not in order, but it will probably contain brand new, the national, converge, big krit, menzingers, manchester orchestra, mount eerie, gang of youths, julien baker aaand pallbearer or godflesh

Prancer
01.10.18
@SpiritCrusher2 probably spot on, but instead of pallbearer/godflesh will probably be Saturation III.

Dewinged
01.10.18
Nothing to declare. We already won.

LionLotus
01.10.18
True... I think that users list is winning

kingdedethefifth
01.10.18
This reminds me that I really need to listen to Tyler the Creator

BlazinBlitzer
01.10.18
I saw a bunch of Gang of Youths and Alex Cameron on the user's list thread. I'm also expecting Brand New, The National, Mezingers, Manchester Orchestra, Mount Eerie, Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, aaaannnnddddd...... Pallbearer?

Divaman
01.10.18
Well, another group of 20 albums none of which were part of my 2017. Looking forward to some overlap between my Top 10 and the Users' Top 10 -- specifically hoping to see two of my Top 10 on the next list. But I guess we'll see.

Sniff
01.10.18
Secretly putting aoty at 19th place. I see what you did there

neekafat
01.10.18
"this list is so much better than staff's :')"
Are you still looking for people to do those write-ups, or...?

mortifierftw
01.10.18
Top ten is gonna have Brand New, The Menzingers, Gang of Youths, Manchester Orchestra, Converge, The National, Julien Baker, Lorde, Mount Eerie, and Kendrick Lamar

neekafat
01.10.18
Phoebe Bridgers...?

brainmelter
01.10.18
nice guys, but no surprises here :/

bgillesp
01.10.18
Surprised Perume Genius is so low

calmrose
01.10.18
sweet, '68 in the top 30

DoofusWainwright
01.10.18
damn, I didn't realise no one had provided a write up for Elder - I could have quickly knocked something up for that one, good album

Jom
01.10.18
>> Are you still looking for people to do those write-ups, or...?

Very generally, a missing write-up means that people got sick, mismanaged their time, or flaked (or some combination of that). I am editing them in as I receive them, but people can always shoutbox me or e-mail me write-ups.

Toondude10
01.10.18
was hoping Ulver would be higher but I wasn't really expecting it to

neekafat
01.10.18
Well I wouldn't mind typing up one for Elder or Vince if you're looking for one (;

Jom
01.10.18
Okay, it's a race between you and Doof for Elder.

kingdedethefifth
01.10.18
Are the write- ups strictly for staff and contribs I'm presuming?

neekafat
01.10.18
I'm def not a contrib lol

butcherboy
01.10.18
ah shit, my bad, guys.. busy/sick/lazy all colliding.. neeka, I believe users have the right to take a crack at the write-ups if the contribs pass on it..

Jade
01.11.18
nice nice, luv the thumbnail images too trey (i believe it is you who designs these, is that right?) Nevertheless, lots of good shit here i've def slept on this past year (when will I find time to Glassjaw again for starters) : )

Toondude10
01.11.18
"Are the write- ups strictly for staff and contribs I'm presuming?"

Nope, some users are asked to write up some blurbs as well. If you want to write something up ask Jom and he can get you to do a fill-in in case the original writer couldn't write it in time.

TheFantasticDangler
01.11.18
only 4 albums I didnt rly click with on this section so cant complain about that, nice to see gang of youths will be top 10

TheFantasticDangler
01.11.18
but ya gang of youths, brand new, the menzingers, the national, manchester orchestra, kendrick lamar, converge, mount eerie for sure in the top 10

neekafat
01.11.18
the menzingers should not be top ten tbh

TheFantasticDangler
01.11.18
agreed, still enjoyed it though

Toondude10
01.11.18
I think Brand New is going to get number 1 tbh

Xenophanes
01.11.18
List has been pretty great so far which surprises me

neekafat
01.11.18
Didn't know where to put my write-up so I threw it in ya shoutbox Jom

ProjectFreak
01.11.18
there's a very good chance the user top 10 will look a lot like my personal top 10, good job sputnik!

neekafat
01.11.18
((((((((:

XingKing
01.11.18
Secretly putting aoty at 19th place. I see what you did there [2]

Frippertronics
01.11.18
AOTY was at 50, whatever do you mean?

TVC15
01.12.18
I really thought Ulver would have been top 10 tbh

onionbubs
01.12.18
really hoped that glassjaw would have been top 10 smh

onionbubs
01.12.18
but yay menzingers

Willie
01.12.18
--nice nice, luv the thumbnail images too trey (i believe it is you who designs these, is that right?)--

Yeah, it's me. Although I didn't get a chance to do the EP list because the free time didn't materialize the way I thought it would...which left someone else to have to do it with no notice. But I did do the staff and user lists.

Papa Universe
01.12.18
whoa, neekafat got a spot?

Jom
01.12.18
Well, when the person who claimed it bailed, he jumped on the chance.

neekafat
01.12.18
Yeahhhhh you know me (:

Papa Universe
01.12.18
and who's the lazyman bailing on Elder?

Jom
01.12.18
Not for me to disclose. No need for pitchforks, anyway.

Papa Universe
01.12.18
of course, as the old saying from the music industry goes: Pitchfork is the last solution, but it's for the best if nobody ever goes there.

cor22222
01.16.18
Elder just 18?

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