The Cure
Disintegration


4.5
superb

Review

by Chris Maziejka USER (49 Reviews)
August 1st, 2006 | 647 replies


Release Date: 1989 | Tracklist


Here from the past to test the ever-pestering judgment of time is one of many classic albums that do not deserve to be overlooked, in any given situation (even if it will cost you everything). Derived from moody 80's post-punk are The Cure, and they've recorded a little album called Disintegration. Much of what seems like gothic rock and emotional ballad to us today can be found on this album and it isn't hard to see that. The Cure liked to create music for tired lovers, exhausted females and shoegazing teenagers. For the most part, everything you look for in an angst-pop band can be traced back to being one of The Cure's signature styles. The band are more of an influence than they initially intended. Its a very rewarding experience, listening to the Cure, then breaking out all your emotastic records and realizing the borrowed sound. With this release the band reinvented emotional music, hollowing them an eternal resting place in the hearts of millions of shy kids. How many people have resorted to Robert Smith and company in times of pain and gloominess? Their effect on the music world and the rest of the planet alike is so gigantic and defined its not even realized. While not underrated in really any way, The Cure have not been blown up to their true height for us. Modern music has many gods, and taking a chair alongside their peers The Cure sits contently, with a vague smirk on their faces.

Sadness galore Disintegration is argueably the band's darkest effort to date, and offers up some of the most eye-welling pieces of music and dank bedroom sitters you'll ever hear. Interestingly enough the band's messages get through but don't fail to amuse. You'd think after a couple tracks you'd be so lovesick as to throw it to the ground and curl under your covers to sob yourself asleep. Not the case. Though not denying this albums adolecsent effects, mood-swings aren't coming in the package. Likely it won't make you cry as much as think, the remainder of The Cure's library are well set for that. Listening to Disintegration is very comparable to reading a book, in the greatest sense. Every song is another chapter, with slightly different feel and attitude to it but remaining in the same mindset as the theme of the album asks for.

With a huge smash comes down on your ears the vocals. Staging quite a show Robert Smith pours his soul through his mouth and delivers a high point in the history of singing. Milestone, this album is for that. Notice, in songs like Lovesong and the title track Robert seems on the verge of tears, trying to hold in his tortured voice to avoid exploitation of his feelings to the listener. It all sounds staged, in a good way like an enthralling play. Your on the edge of your seat peering into the depths of the album trying to wonder what exactly Smith and company were doing at that very moment, what they felt and what they thought. Its such a grasp on your heart in the right situation. Robert is talented enough to utilize his voice in certain ways never heard before, and really his biggest impact is the ability to sing his thoughts out to you. His emotion will never be mistaken. As well, it is most defenitely tough to exact at times what exactly is behind Robert in the duration that he sings. The guitars will sound out of this world, and the drums echoe their gloomy notes aiding the bass to create a near mystifying enviornment. I would imagine for Robert it would be like singing in a jungle, expressing what you feel you need to in front of a sea of animalistic sounds. It almost feels progressive, at times.

Drumming and guitar playing fortify the tale of a miniscule fairy's flight down the riverbed. Both instruments take up an imperitive role in the setting of the story. The drums most obviously make their role the speech of this particular pixie, exclaiming all her plights and fears to anybody who would listen. Guitar making sounds of the streaming liquid of whatever may be flowing under her minute feet, but defenitely noticed. She conquers her fear of something moving that fast and blends with it, becoming one of the many glimmering dots of light floating through the air following the river. Disintegration is a painting, one very pretty to look at. One of those where, if you listen hard enough it feels like you can experience the artist's suffering, doubt, happiness...in all their glory. Like a legend. A story that makes blood rush to your face at its most valiant moments. Perhaps like I halfway through listening to this album you may ponder all the laughable attempts at producing emotional music that you've heard. How can they think they are any match for The Cure and their masterpiece? Well, influence is influence. And The Cure and their masterpiece should always know that. Without them there would exist not as much feeling to this kind of music, Post-Punk and early nineties goth music would be simply another forgotton genre with nothing redeemable to relate itself to. Or maybe even it wouldn't exist? Unlikely, but there isn't any doubt that Robert Smith and his band had a lasting impact on those bands. Influence and message are, I think, one of this band's greatest achievements in all their career. They won't exceed as much as they've already done as their career slowly winds down, and Smith ages. Holding such an enviornmental monument in your hands, you should feel the shock of emotion flow through your veins.

In the end, The Cure, aside from all the feeling put into this album...for those who aren't into that will find an orgasmic mesh of instrument and their master. The band are really a band here, and Disintegration is most defenitely their greatest success as a band themselves. The musical co-operation here is amazingly beautiful and so well excecuted. Emotion pending, The Cure makes what seems to be a great piece of art. Then, all of a sudden it hits you: I'm going to cry! Yes it does have an effect of that stature on certain ears. Maybe it will be yours?

Credits:

Vocals/Various instrumentation: Robert Smith
Guitars: Porl Thompson
Bass: Simon Gallup
Drums: Boris Williams
Keyboards: Roger O'Donnell



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user ratings (1581)
Chart.
4.5
superb
other reviews of this album
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Comments:Add a Comment 
francesfarmer
August 2nd 2006


1477 Comments


Hellooooo out there...

Cygnus Inter Anates
August 2nd 2006


721 Comments


Who's the Cure?

mynameischan
Staff Reviewer
August 2nd 2006


17939 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Didn't they cover one of 311's songs or something?

francesfarmer
August 2nd 2006


1477 Comments


: (

mynameischan
Staff Reviewer
August 2nd 2006


17939 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

OH and nice review.

The Sludge
August 2nd 2006


2169 Comments


Hahaha, 311 covered Cure's song. nice emphysis on the sad face FF.

I keep hearing this is the definitive Cure album. I want to get into The Cure, but never really gave it that chance yet.

francesfarmer
August 2nd 2006


1477 Comments


Mmm...get Pornography or Boys Don't Cry first. Then listen to this.

PrimalBreath
August 2nd 2006


27 Comments


This review is off da hook muh brotha.

Cygnus Inter Anates
August 2nd 2006


721 Comments


cause boooooooooooys
donnnnnnnt cryyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

dah nuh nih nah nih dah nuh nih nuh nih dah nuh nih nah ni niiiii nih nuh nuh

francesfarmer
August 2nd 2006


1477 Comments


Its got the best video, ever.

enkelin
August 2nd 2006


1 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

the best cure album! no doubt

coin
March 21st 2007


2 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0


Although I love this album, Head on the Door is my all time favorite. It contains the more raw Cure sound of the early days.

Nice review though, spot on




MeowMeow
June 4th 2007


662 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

You know you want to knock the rating up .5 more. Great review. I heart this album.This Message Edited On 06.04.07

Willie
Moderator
October 25th 2007


16117 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

By far the best album by The Cure... I was hoping no one had reviewed this before, but I should've known better.This Message Edited On 10.25.07

Digging: Kenn Nardi - Dancing With the Past

StreetlightRock
Emeritus
November 14th 2007


3776 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Man, i like this album, got some stellar songs, but the synths get a little overbearing and sometimes it sounded a tad dated as well. Rating might go up on more listens.

Willie
Moderator
November 14th 2007


16117 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Man, i like this album, got some stellar songs, but the synths get a little overbearing and sometimes it sounded a tad dated as well.
It was released in 1989, of course it might sound a little dated to some but by the time you get to "The Same Deep Water as You" that thought should be gone and you should be in awe of this album's flawlessness.

Oh, and what Gothic rock band's synth's don't have a tendency to get a little overbearing if you're not into that? ;)This Message Edited On 11.14.07

cbmartinez
November 15th 2007


2525 Comments


album is soooooooo good

NeoOrder
January 22nd 2008


25 Comments


Not really my favorite Cure album. Comes off as a bit pretentious in some songs, shown by the 2 minute plus intro on most of them.

Some of it's better tracks keep me coming back though. The likes of Disintegration, Homesick, Lovesong and Closedown.

StreetlightRock
Emeritus
January 22nd 2008


3776 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Pictures of You, Love Song, Fascination Street and the three best here IMO.

Mikesn
Emeritus
January 22nd 2008


3709 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Still need to hear this.



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