The Moody Blues
Every Good Boy Deserves Favour


3.0
good

Review

by Divaman USER (74 Reviews)
October 5th, 2017 | 18 replies


Release Date: 1971 | Tracklist

Review Summary: An enjoyable, if middling, progressive rock snack.

The Moody Blues are often credited as "pioneers" of progressive rock, due to their 1967 album Days of Future Passed being considered among the first successful concept albums. In spite of this, in many ways, The Moodies were really kind of a middle-of-the-road prog rock band. Their music wasn't as influential as King Crimson's, or as complicated as Yes's. What they created at their best was a number of melodic prog rock albums with a classical tinge. Their music mixed soft rock sounds with healthy doses of mellotron, orchestral string instruments, woodwinds and keyboards, to create pleasant-sounding songs that were almost as much pop as they were prog rock. Lacking one outstanding lead vocalist to match contemporaries such as Yes and ELP, they made do with four different acceptable lead vocalists (Justin Hayward, John Lodge, Mike Pinder and Ray Thomas), which helped to keep their sound varied and interesting. As to which album was their "masterpiece", I'm not sure they had one. Instead, they had a series of seven albums between 1967 and and 1972 that were incredibly consistent -- if you liked one, chances are you liked them all.

Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (1971) is the second-to-last of these. It's as good an example as any of the strengths, and shortcomings, of this much-loved classic rock band. Named after a mnemonic device to help young guitar students remember the order of the notes of the treble clef, the album contains nine songs, all of which are pretty good. Of the nine, two are by Hayward, two by Lodge, two by Thomas, one by Pinder, and two are group efforts. The "single" from the LP, and one of the rockier numbers, is Hayward's "The Story in Your Eyes". However, truth be told, The Moodies were never really a singles band. At the time of the album's release, at least on American FM radio, each of the nine songs received its share of airplay.

The first track, "Procession" serves as something of an overture. It features various sounds, such as howling wind, falling rain, Indian sitar music, etc., to present the listener with a series of changing moods, several of which are punctuated by a "tion" word: "Desolation", "Creation" and "Communication". This comes to culmination (no pun intended) on the album's sixth track, "One More Time to Live", where songsmith Lodge reels off an impressive series of more than twenty of these "tion/sion" words, working his way from a starting point of "Desolation" through the final two, "Compassion" and "Solution".

For better or worse, this song exemplifies the band's philosophical scope. On the one hand, the lyrics are clever and dramatic. On the other, they're about as deep as a puddle. The profundity of The Moody Blues' belief system basically boils down to this: All you need is love. Or as Pinder puts it in the album-closing "My Song", "Love can change the world/Love can change your life/Do what makes you happy/Do what you know is right". Can I get a "Kumbaya" here?

If it sounds like I'm belittling the band, or the album, I don't mean to. To put out a series of albums as listenable and satisfying as they did from Days of Future Passed through 1972's Seventh Sojourn is no small feat, and of these, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour is probably my favorite. Nine songs worth of enjoyment is nothing to sneeze at. I'm just trying to point out that the band had their limitations. But within the scope of these limitations, there's plenty of pleasure for prog rock fans everywhere.

To review: Simple (for prog rock), listenable tunes. Depthless, but well-written lyrics. Acceptable vocals. Gentle, semi-orchestral rock sounds. Every Good Boy Deserves Favour isn't a musical gourmet meal. However, it is a tasty and filling prog rock snack. Enjoy.



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user ratings (64)
Chart.
3.7
great

Comments:Add a Comment 
Divaman
October 5th 2017


1361 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Moody Blues fun fact: Although this is now correctly credited as The Moody Blues' seventh studio album, during the seventies, in America at least, it was considered the band's sixth. That's because their first, "The Magnificent Moodies", has such a different sound, and was recorded before Justin Hayward and John Lodge joined the band. That's why their eighth album is called "Seventh Sojourn" and their ninth is called "Octave". I don't know exactly when people started saying that "The Magnificent Moodies" had to be considered the band's legitimate first album, but when they did, they completely effed up the titles of those two later albums.

Digging: Looming - Seed

Lena01
October 5th 2017


3 Comments


The Moody Blues are an English rock band formed in Birmingham in 1964. They first came to prominence playing rhythm and blues music, but their second album, Days of Future Passed, which was released in 1967, was a fusion of rock with classical music and established them as pioneers in the development of art rock and progressive rock. It has been described as a "landmark" and "one of the first successful concept albums". They became known internationally with singles including "Go Now", "Nights in White Satin", "Tuesday Afternoon" and "Question". They have been awarded 18 platinum and gold discs. The Moody Blues have sold 70 million records worldwide.


Divaman
October 5th 2017


1361 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Why yes. Yes they have.

bnelso55
October 5th 2017


1250 Comments


Good work, Divaman! Pos'd. I enjoyed the read. I've never really given The Moody Blues much of a chance, though. I'm thinking I'll check some of the album highlights you mentioned and move on to some of their more highly rated releases.

SandwichBubble
October 5th 2017


4443 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

this one holds a soft spot in my heart



nice review

Digging: Arrington de Dionyso's Malaikat Dan Singa - Open the Crown

e210013
October 5th 2017


1512 Comments


Nice to see this finally reviewed here, and I'm not really surprised for be made by you. I'm very glad to see some love for this band. It's not the best archetype of a prog rock band, but as you said, they where one of the pioneers of prog and of conceptual albums. Unfortunatelly, they're in nowadays, almost a forgotten band.

Nice review too, as always. Pos.

Friday13th
October 5th 2017


5946 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

"To put out a series of albums as listenable and satisfying as they did from Days of Future Passed through 1972's Seventh Sojourn is no small feat, and of these, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour is probably my favorite."

Still only a 3.0? Ouch. Good review, though. TBH this and Question of Balance are my least favorite of the 7. Here's my ranking:

1. Days [Solid 5.0! Groundbreaking, immersive and highest highs]

2. Children's Children [4.5 and most consistent]

3. Lost Chord [most psych]

4. Sojourn [lot of touching songs with more lyrical depth]

5. Threshold [sucks at the beginning but Side B is mellotron heaven]



Digging: Universal Totem Orchestra - Mathematical Mother

Divaman
October 5th 2017


1361 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

I almost changed it to a 3.5, Friday. But I decided to leave it a 3. It's probably about a 3.2 to me.

Jethro42
October 5th 2017


15004 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I didn't jam some Moody Blues for ages. Band reminds me of Procol Harum for their marriage of rock and orchestral arrangements, and both of them are pioneers of progressive rock. I prefer Procol Harum for their richer sound, and their skill to compose memorable melodies. The Moody Blues are influenced by the psych bands of the 60s and they often sound dated here and there in some individual songs, but on the other hand, they're innovative thanks to their flirt with symphonic rock and folk, and their use of the mellotron into a band context was exceptional in their early days.

Review was pleasant to read, Diva.

Jethro42
October 5th 2017


15004 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I edited my last comment because I struggled with couple of my sentences :/

Divaman
October 5th 2017


1361 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Thanks Jethro. I also prefer Procol Harum, but the Moodies certainly have made some beautiful music.

RippingCorpse1986
October 5th 2017


59 Comments


Haven't heard something from these guys in a long time. I'm not so much of a prog guy, but this band was consistently great for many years.
Guess I need to re-listen their discography. Nice review, pos.

Digging: Shrapnel (UK) - Raised on Decay

SowingSeason
Moderator
October 5th 2017


24799 Comments


Great band. Great review.

Digging: St. Vincent - MASSEDUCTION

Divaman
October 5th 2017


1361 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Thanks everyone for your kind remarks.

TheSpaceMan
October 6th 2017


9235 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

nice review dude

ZackSh33
October 6th 2017


644 Comments


Good review here, nice to see the Moody Blues getting some credit for what they did. Parents had all of these albums growing up, but my favorite is still Days of Future Passed.

Divaman
October 6th 2017


1361 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Thanks guys. They are a classic band.

TheIntruder
October 9th 2017


297 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Not one of my favourites but still a good album. Belongs to their classic era. Good review too. Have a pos.



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