The Bouncing Souls
The Gold Record


4.0
excellent

Review

by Mr. Lean Mug USER (112 Reviews)
June 6th, 2006 | 18 replies | 7,635 views


Release Date: 2006 | Tracklist


4 of 4 thought this review was well written

Sometimes bands mature over time. The members get older, the fan base grows, the music scene changes, and bands decide to compensate. Some call it �selling-out.� Some call it �progress.� It really all depends on how one looks at things. Now, not all of these changes are for the better. When a band alienates its fan base, or produces any other negative effect in the interest of growth, then I�m inclined to lean towards the �selling-out� point of view. However, as I am just a humble reviewer, I tend to stay on the fence when faced with such matters. Of course, what happens when a band transcends its original roots, without any detrimental feedback, then something truly special has occurred. Again, I like to keep my opinions as unbiased as possible, but for once, I�m going to make a slight suggestion. The Bouncing Souls have achieved the latter of these two sides of the spectrum with their latest release, The Gold Record.

Ever since their humble beginnings as a bratty pop-punk band from New Jersey, the Bouncing Souls have been something of a unique act. However, they suffered from one real shortcoming throughout most of their career: they lacked complexity and depth when writing songs. Honestly, some of their earliest works sound like they threw the songs together in five minutes of less. Middle of the road albums showcase the Souls� gravitation towards a more coherent, intricate style of pop-punk. The end result of said gravitation would be The Gold Record. Blending elements of the Souls� past with new, tasteful flavors, The Gold Record is a perfect example of the musical progression bands can go through over the years.

From a musical standpoint, The Gold Record is rather impressive (for the Bouncing Souls, at least). While the Souls have hardly been poor musicians in the past, their performance on their latest album is simply fantastic. Tight, edgy, fast guitars; furious drumming; powerful bass; a dash of harmonica here, accordion, and what do you have? A pop-punk album that�s both ambitious, yet fairly staid at the same time. Lyrically, the Souls are as astute as ever. Since they�re long past their days of writing 1-2 minute songs, the listener can actually get a serious taste of their songwriting talent. Catchy, well-written lyrics, when matched with the hooky music, captures the Souls� sound of the past, and at the same time creates something that is totally new.

The album begins with �The Gold Song.� From the sound of breaking bottles and shouting of �hey� that makes up the intro, it�s easy to see that this is going to be one of the strongest songs on the album. Fast, catchy lyrics overlay the fantastic instrumentation. The bass work is especially noticeable on this song (mostly due to the fantastic bass-driven break down). �The Gold Song� is a wonderfully energetic way to kick off one hell of an album. I can appreciate �So Jersey� quite a bit. Since it�s a ballad about the U.S. state in which I currently reside, I can connect with what The Bouncing Souls are trying to say (to a certain extent). �So Jersey� is a slower song than its predecessor. Addictively melodic, it�s a welcome change of pace of the album. �Sounds Of the City� is the poppiest song thus far. Meaning it�s awesome (as the Souls do the whole �pop� thing very well). Everything from the fresh melodies to the great lyrics make this yet another solid track.

Sometimes, songs with the most interesting titles or concepts can be the weakest you�ll find. Unfortunately, �The Pizza Song� is no exception. Though it features The Bouncing Souls� trademark quirkiness (complete with accordion and trumpet!), �The Pizza Song� just doesn�t stack up to the rest of The Gold Record. However, it�s still an enjoyable listen, as it�s one of the most unique selections instrumentally. Ah, we�ve hit my personal favorite: �Sarah Saturday.� Every aspect of this song is excellent. From the intoxicating lyrics, to the bumping basslines, to the fantastically catchy chorus, �Sarah Saturday� is (in my humble opinion) the strongest track on the album. �Better Things� is a cover of a classic song by The Kinks. The Bouncing Souls do it quite a good deal of justice. It�s a great song to begin with, but with a little of the Souls� flair, it becomes a fantastic joyride.

�The Messenger� is another one of the most ambitiously wonderful songs on The Gold Record. This is due in part to the fact that it features and absolutely incredible harmonica solo. �Lean on Sheena� is the second cover song; this originally of Avoid One Thing. Seriously though, what the hell is up with punks and the name Sheena? Sure, it makes for some damn good music, but obsession is unhealthy. Much like �Better Things,� the Souls impress with �Lean on Sheena.� Well, the souls have decided to get political with �Letter From Iraq.� With lyrics spouting off about �an eye for an eye� justice, and �Jihad Johnny,� The Bouncing Souls may catch some heat for this song. However, at it�s core �Letter From Iraq� is a powerful, anti-war message, that conveys its point in its own brand of eloquence.

�The New Thing� is a relatively boring song. It sort of sticks out like a sore thumb in the fast moving pace that The Gold Record is running at. It�s not really a bad song, it just doesn�t mesh very well at this point. Chalk it up as a good song that�s been plagued by poor position selection. �Midnight Mile� is quite possibly the best example of The Bouncing Souls� mature approach to their songwriting. As usual, great lyrics and music, coupled with impressive song structure, make this another impressive song. The Bouncing Souls have chosen to end The Gold Record on a pseudo-balled note. At 6:49, �For All The Unheard� was a fantastic choice as an album ender. As the song fades into a powerful interlude that screams �pop-punk,� you can almost feel the raw energy of the album slip away, much like a candle being blown out in the wind.

The Gold Record is an excellent album. Melodic, well-constructed, and full of attitude, it represents the best qualities of The Bouncing Souls of the past and future. If I had to nitpick, I�d say that the only place that this album fails in is the most common pitfall of punk albums in general: repetition. There�s just a little too much of it. All in all, The Gold Record is good fun. Check it out whether you�re an old fan of the Souls, or someone just discovering one of the Garden State�s best kept secrets.


This review is dedicated to the Mx Pop-punk Community. For obvious reasons (well, obvious to them).




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Comments:Add a Comment 
JohnXDoesn't
June 6th 2006



1267 Comments


I've been meaning to listen to these guys. I saw them twice several years ago when they opened a couple of gigs for Rancid. Never bothered to look further into them. Heard a compilation disc a friend of mine made up a few months ago, but forgot about it. I'll have to give this a listen from my music service. Sounds like a good place to start. Nice job, Hep.This Message Edited On 06.06.06

jaredrl
June 6th 2006



99 Comments


How old are the members in the band anyways?

Zebra
Moderator
June 6th 2006



2647 Comments


I'm on and off with the Bouncing Souls. They have released two dreadful records (their s/t and Anchors Away but How I Spent My Summer Vacation is amazing and is why I still think this might be a good album. Good work on the review.

Henrik
June 6th 2006



26 Comments


S/t and Anchors away aren't dreadful at all.

DepthsOfDreams555
June 6th 2006



55 Comments


Good review, solid album.

Bron-Yr-Aur
June 6th 2006



4405 Comments


Nice job Hep, once again.

demonhellcat
June 6th 2006



7 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

"How old are the members in the band anyways?"
-jaredrl

They've been around awhile. I don't know how old they guys are but wiki says the bands been active since 1987 although they're first full length album wasn't released until 1994.

Good review, I need to check this one out. I have Hopeless Romantic and like it.

kno_kontrol
June 6th 2006



448 Comments


Good review. It looks like Ill have to check out this album as I am slowly falling in love with Anchors Aweigh and How I Spent My Summer Vacation. Hopeless Romantic is cool too, but its much too repetitive imo.

demonhellcat
June 7th 2006



7 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

My first impressions of the album is that it is better than hopeless romantic. Sarah Saturday is awesome and the pizza song isn't as bad as I was expecting. Hopefully it has the lasting power that hopeless romantic had with me.

nethanger1
June 7th 2006



2 Comments


They're in their mid to late 30s.

nethanger1
June 7th 2006



2 Comments


They're in their mid to late 30s.

Golan
June 14th 2006



4 Comments


I love this band. Definately will check out the record.

here comes the bird flu
October 22nd 2006



22 Comments


great review

Zesty Mordant
October 22nd 2006



1196 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

"Pizza Song" is so undeniably catchy.

Let's Chop Cats!
November 29th 2006



142 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

This album is perfect.

Jack Wilson
November 29th 2006



313 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

nice review. i love these guys.

Hambone00
April 30th 2007



2 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

This album amazes me, I love it so much, I cant even put it into words how much I love it.... Just saw these guys a couple nights ago at Call the Office In london, Ontario

EVedder27
December 15th 2010



6088 Comments


probably my favorite souls album



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