The Enid
In The Region of the Summer Stars


5.0
classic

Review

by A : w.e.b. CONTRIBUTOR (100 Reviews)
July 25th, 2015 | 65 replies


Release Date: 1976 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Uniting the classical world with rock music for the better...

January 1, 1975 – New Years’ Day. One Peter Roberts, vocalist for the burgeoning classically-infused progressive rock collective The Enid, committed suicide. In the midst of crafting what was to be their debut, the band and founder Robert John Godfrey now were at an unfortunate point in their infancy. Not only did they lose a friend, but also a vital asset to the band that was still growing as a unit. In a situation where most bands would immediately fold in respect of the dead or because of the difficulties in replacing a deceased key member, The Enid strove onward. This unexpected development led to what was to be The Enid’s debut album to completely overhauled and reconstructed to be purely and absolutely instrumental. A concept loosely based on the tarot cards, mostly focused on the “Major Arcana” – ”the lovers, the tower, death, judgment, the fool, and so on”In The Region of the Summer Stars was the end result of a three year quest to unite classical music with rock, all the while without pretensions that plagued the progressive rock genre.

At a very refined thirty-nine minutes, Region makes haste with the concept presented before the listener from the very start of the silent classical piano of ”Fool”, a prelude that eases the listener into what is to come with the Bartok-inspired ”The Falling Tower”, an explosive opener that essentially shows off The Enid as a tightly-knit unit that sounds far from a relatively new band, but rather as veterans of their craft. Robert Godfrey, keyboardist of the group, often has his moments to shine throughout the album; most certainly on ”The Lovers”, a romantic piano piece that is subtly complimented with quelled guitars and hefty percussion that Rachmaninov would be proud of. The heavier side of the band certainly shines through with ”Death, The Reaper” and ”The Devil”, the former showcasing guitarists Francis Lickerish and Stephen Stewart, the latter presenting the prowess of bassist Glen Tollet and drummer Dave Storey.

Whereas the first half of Region was an exhibition of the individual skills of the band, the second uses an eighteen minute sequence (“The Sun/The Last Judgment/In The Region of the Summer Stars”) to flawlessly execute a proper display of The Enid’s potential as an up-and-coming progressive rock band. Increasingly classical in theme, the sequence’s dynamics begin quite quietly as ”The Sun” is the calm before the storm that is ”The Last Judgement”, a piece inspired by the “Dies Irae”. Consisting of a percussive march-like beat akin to Holst’s ”Mars” that segues into a slow, powerful crescendo as the instruments become intonated with one another, "Judgement"'s buildup and subsequent crescendos creates a breathtaking climax. The final piece of this sequence, ”In The Region of the Summer Stars” makes use of every bit of time it is allotted, each instrument playing with the main theme of the piece, especially the guitar duo of Lickerish and Stewart.

The journey to unite classical music with rock music, albeit without pretentious showmanship and themes that often served to be a hindrance to progressive rock was The Enid’s lone purpose, and despite the hardships the band experienced in the making of In The Region of the Summer Stars, it is safe to say they certainly accomplished what they set out to achieve. A loss of a vocalist is a hard thing to get over. Falling apart as a result is without a doubt an extremely difficult obstacle to steer clear of. Yet, with all of the options The Enid could’ve pondered, they decided to go on in order to complete what they saw as an important piece of music. Quite honestly, it is for the best that The Enid decided to go onward. Who knows what could’ve been without them.



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Robert Davis CONTRIBUTOR (4.5)
Progressive Rock and Classical Music=The perfect musical combination....


Comments:Add a Comment 
Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

Totally didn't delete the old review and revamp it...



Album: http://enidi.progzilla.com/player/ITROTSS1976.htm



The Enid were:



Robert John Godfrey - Keyboards

Francis Lickerish - Guitars

Stephen Stewart - Guitars

Glen Tollet - Bass, Tuba and Keyboards

Dave Storey - Drums and Percussion

Neil Kavanagh - Flute

Dave Hancock - Trumpet on “The Sun” and the bridge between “The Last Judgement”

and “In The Region Of The Summer Stars”



Asdfp277
July 25th 2015


14010 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

"The Lovers" is gorgeous, I love this

MrSirLordGentleman
July 25th 2015


10462 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

asdf why the hell u not into prog

Asdfp277
July 25th 2015


14010 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

Idk, I just find it hard to connect to most music, it's a struggle tbh :c

Asdfp277
July 25th 2015


14010 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

A few things I spotted:



In the quote from the first paragraph,– ”the lovers, the tower, death, judgment, the fool, and so on.” – isn't the period at the end unnecessary?





"Increasingly classical in theme, the sequence’s dynamics begin quite quietly as ”The Sun” is the calm before the storm that is ”The Last Judgement”, a piece inspired by the “Dies Irae” that consists of a percussive march-like beat akin to Holst’s ”Mars” that segues into a slow, powerful crescendo as the instruments become intonated with one another, creating a breathtaking climax"

-Maybe you should break this sentence somewhere, it's a little too long. Also, shouldn't "Dies Irae" be italicized as well?



"makes use of every bit time it is allotted, "

-"Bit of time"? Idk



". A loss of a vocalist is a hard thing to get over, without a doubt an extremely difficult obstacle to steer clear of."

-Kinda seems like you said The Enid could have avoided the death of their vocalist... but maybe it's just me

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

Ah, thanks Asd. Kinda wrote this as I was listening to the original version of this and the 80s remake. So I pretty much wrote this in an hour's time. The mistakes are unsurprising, really.



As for the vocalist bit, I meant as in it'd be hard to get over the loss of such an important member of the band but I can definitely retool that segment.



That's the best part about writing, is the bits you don't notice and figuring out ways to improve upon the initial write-up. Idk if that's just me but

Asdfp277
July 25th 2015


14010 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

the best part is listening to the album and "getting" it imo, and coming up with analogies and explanations and metaphors and connections, but what do i know i've never reviewed anything in my life lol

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

eh I wouldn't know about the whole analogies thing to save my life really



If it's good, it's good. So that's essentially what I aim for in my writing.

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

Also retooled the bits you pointed out to me, thanks again.



And thanks to Static, check this album mane

Asdfp277
July 25th 2015


14010 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

check this album mane [2]

RadicalEd
July 25th 2015


8232 Comments


Really didn't like this album. Great review though.

Digging: Jesca Hoop - Memories Are Now

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

Sorry to hear Ed, but it isn't really for everyone I suppose though I try to force everyone I talk to on here to listen to this album at least once.



Surprisingly out of all of the people I've told to check this, only one person didn't really care for it.









ArsMoriendi...not quirky and obnoxious enough

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

He 2.5d this and 3'd another one I rec'd him. Still kinda salty about it, considering he hardly gave them a chance.



Then again, he needs zany sound effects to keep his attention. Whatever.

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

But yes this is classically-infused progressive rock totally original

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

it's right here would u capture it or would u let it slip

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

ouch



slipnspookyrabbitslide thankfully will never be in these threads

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

probs because slip's comments are usually nonsense tbh



for every decent post, there's a slew of useless chatter





then again, he's now a rabbit. and was a ghost. and formerly, a goddamn slip and slide



you really want a slip and slide ghost rabbit in a prog thread, Stat?

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

believe what you want, i believe that a slip and slide ghost rabbit exists

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

one day...

Frippertronics
Contributing Reviewer
July 25th 2015


12742 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

i've felt fuckin honored since you replied to my shitty third reich n roll review from 2013 tbh



reminds me i should do more residents, debut album is probably in my top 25 all time



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