Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67


5.0
classic

Review

by Andrew W. Gold CONTRIBUTOR (95 Reviews)
February 10th, 2015 | 120 replies


Release Date: 1808 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Timeless

I make no secret of the fact that Ludwig van Beethoven is my favorite composer of all time. To this day I’m hopelessly in awe of his work. Sure, Mozart was inherently more talented and a far more technical writer, but nothing matched Beethoven when it came to inculcating pure basal emotions. Beethoven’s body of work includes some of the most fierce, morose, macabre, and beautiful melodies put onto paper. Among his most famous pieces is this, ‘No. 5 in C minor’, which embodies every one of these qualities that substantiates Beethoven as an unmatched virtuoso of his craft. Its opening is fierce; threatening; urgent; the second movement is a stunning orchestral composition with pulchritudinous elegance; the final movements close the symphony with bravado and conviction. Beethoven grips your attention right from the start and appeals to your pathos right up to the symphony’s final seconds. It’s a timeless piece of music, still referenced in mainstream media and publicly performed regularly by numerous philharmonics – a two-century-old composition that hasn’t aged a day. If that isn’t the sign of a transcendent masterpiece, then I don’t know what is.

The symphony opens with the most famous musical motif ever; and of the many hyperbolic statements you’ll come across in this review, this is not one of them. It is dramatic and tragic – it states its presence with bold condemnation, like a schoolteacher slamming his foot on the wooden floor to silence a room full of children. What makes this motif so iconic is its simplicity. It’s literally four notes played in succession and then the same four-note pattern a whole-step lower. So easy a baby can do it. But it’s not the pattern itself that makes it iconic – it’s the tension it creates: the suspenseful tenuto of every note, stretching the end of each phrase and yearning for the subsequent silence before the second pattern commences. These subtleties, performed by a full orchestra, at fortissimo no less, can turn any human soul into complete submission. Beethoven commands your attention, and he’ll get it; and this all takes place within the first ten seconds.

It’s also worth noting that ‘Symphony No. 5’ is Beethoven’s only symphony meant to be taken in as a whole. This is not to say his other works are best listened to movement by movement; this just happens to be the only symphony that treats itself as one sinuous, grandiose piece. Musical ideas from the first movements are recapitulated in the finale Allegro, and each movement flows into the next with the seamless ataraxia akin to watching a feature film. Themes are repeated and hinted at throughout; motifs are tampered with to befit the various settings in which they’re used; the movements stream into one another like weaves on a mosaic tapestry; and everything comes together on IV. Allegro, which modulates to C major to suit its epic theatrical denouement. Despite the piece being largely written in the minor key, Ludwig Van himself justified this anomaly by stating: “Many assert that every minor piece must end in the minor. Nego! ...Joy follows sorrow, sunshine – rain.” What an appropriate turn of phrase to describe the symphony’s triumphant conclusion.

The end of the symphony marks a moment of resolution and ease, as if a weighty burden is finally lifted off your shoulders. Much like tapering off an adrenaline rush, the symphony releases you from a state of excitement and tension, allowing you to breathe slowly and think rationally again, but cravings of that intense high will stick with you long after. Yes, technically I just compared ‘Symphony No. 5’ to a drug, and it’s really the only tangible comparison I can make. The sensation stays in your system long after and it provokes the same exultant experience each time you listen to it. It’s timeless in its fundamental sense. Once that first gargantuan motif meets your ears there’s no turning back; it’s branded into your psyche. This composition technique of bleak elation and charismatic dread is what allowed Beethoven to transcend past the notes on the page into an effervescent endowment to the music world, and ‘Symphony No. 5’ was only one of many. Music was never the same again.


Notable Performances:
Daniel Barenboim & the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan & the Berliner Philharmoniker




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Comments:Add a Comment 
Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


22848 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

yep, i dropped the p-bomb in a beethoven review.

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Tunaboy45
February 10th 2015


7912 Comments


Great review Andrew, imaginary pos.



Digging: Between the Buried and Me - Coma Ecliptic

JWT155
February 10th 2015


10767 Comments


Eh this symphony is over rated, I preferred his older stuff...

adr
February 10th 2015


6953 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

nah it's his 3rd best after 9 and 6

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Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


22848 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

5 > 7 >= 9 > 3 >= 6 > 8 > the rest

CaptainDooRight
February 10th 2015


407 Comments


yee lud's always timeless

Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


22848 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

i didnt know what to make the summary so i just picked the first word that popped in my head

TalonsOfFire
February 10th 2015


13148 Comments


About time this got a review, imaginary pos

TychoBrahe
February 10th 2015


332 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

no. 5 lives up to its number.

Mort.
February 10th 2015


6512 Comments


"pulchritudinous"

damn son nice word usage

actually read the whole review, which i rarely do. Brilliant read, well done

Digging: Unwound - Repetition

laughingman22
February 10th 2015


2267 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

The 7th is secretly the best, but this one is the masterwork

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Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


22848 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

thank ya mort. :]

Mythodea
February 10th 2015


2095 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

And 9 actually wins 7, but all these stay in the backround. Great review. Good to see classical music get reviews, especially such ones. Imaginary pos.



Again, I like 9 the best.

Digging: Godsticks - Emergence

Atari
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


20759 Comments


damn fine review Ins, wouldn't change a thing

have you head any of Franz Schubert's works? If not I think you'd really dig him

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forkliftjones
February 10th 2015


490 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

oh yes finally a review!

cryptside
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


2346 Comments


"a stunning orchestral composition with pulchritudinous elegance"
Holy shit busted out pulchritudinous, sexy word usage my friend. Awesome review here, the hyperbole is justified I'm sure. I need to start down the road of classical myself, so maybe I will start here.

ScuroFantasma
February 10th 2015


3234 Comments


Fantastic review, been listening to some classical recently after picking up a used classical guitar. Some of the stuff I've heard has changed my perspective on music as a whole.

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facupm
February 10th 2015


9892 Comments


timeless, although 9 is better imo

Valkyrion
February 10th 2015


469 Comments


Just a few things I noticed

>Sure, Mozart was inherently more talented and a far more technical writer,

Less “talented and technical” in what aspects exactly? Do you mean Beethoven is not as impressive as an
orchestrator/composer or as a technical innovator? Both musicians were extremely versatile and succesful
in pretty much all areas (piano works, symphonies, quartets, quintets, vocal works, etc..)

>It’s also worth noting that ‘Symphony No. 5’ is Beethoven’s only symphony meant to be taken in as a whole


This sentence might be misleading since symphony (sonata) as a compositional form envisions all movements
to be played as a set and not doing so is not much different from stopping a 25 minute prog suite halfway
into it. The followup to the sentence is still valid though

glad to see this reviewed nonethless.

Insurrection
Contributing Reviewer
February 10th 2015


22848 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

talent wise theres really no arguing that mozart was a prodigy. he began writing symphonies/operas before he hit double digits iirc, and his writing style is more technical and jumpy as opposed to beethoven's moody approach. thats all i meant by it



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