Thine Eyes Bleed
Thine Eyes Bleed


4.0
excellent

Review

by Jared Floryan USER (6 Reviews)
September 6th, 2014 | 0 replies


Release Date: 2008 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A savagely honest and reckless album, Thine Eyes Bleed are far less concerned with the supercilious side of metal.

As the days and nights go by quicker, a ghoul floating right above the heads of the living has come to the conclusion that distinctiveness is hard to come by recently. The curious spirit has casually entered the bodies of each person - who possess no abnormalities nor special characteristics - and a huge chunk of them are obsessed with the SAME. DAMN. TRENDS. Our ghastly companion not only assumes that these insignificant mortals are into such trends like the speechless Internet memes, they also listen to eerily similar music which is popular. A regular jack off would tell you folks this is natural, though in the mind of the phantom, he thinks the uninteresting humans are killing themselves without seeing through the lack of originality or new blood. Regarding the music industry (especially in terms of heavy metal), we've seen KoRn play nu metal -a genre which was unheard of WAY back then - and other entourages including Coal Chamber and Papa Roach existing just to latch onto the style's success. Though no matter how uptight morons like myself aren't into conventionality, there ARE a couple of bands who may as well be thorougly enjoyable for it; Thine Eyes Bleed, is one of those likeable groups.

A quintet, these people are a Canadian band from London, Ontario. Established in 2004, these five warriors assembled in search of a sound which - while not being too orthodox - had the potential to have the aliens and homosapiens live in harmony. Their style is principally rooted in melodic death metal with thrash undertones, so if you're ever willing to make comparisons between this outfit, God Forbid, and The Haunted, be my salvageable guest. Ever since Thine Eyes Bleed's formation, this five-piece team has dished out three full-lengths containing mystical cover artwork underlying a direct, but no less coarse or fast approach to the subgenre. More often than not, they're characterized by Justin Wolfe's ominous growling and riffage that's nothing but to-the-point adoration. The band's latest release was The Embers Rise, issued in the year of 2011; three eyes prior to their third record, a sophomore album (self-entitled) made its tranquil, yet virulent attack on society.

Made available on April 15, 2008, Thine Eyes Bleed featured a decrepit pile of 10 tracks disregarding both quantity and the fiery pits of Gehenna. The album can easily be likened to a vibrating wheelchair holding a rendezvous at a holy graveyard; the former leans closer to a typical nature, whilst the cemetery seeps with mythical abilities. This also goes hand-in-hand with Thine Eyes Bleed themselves, who utilize a straightforward (if haunting) tone in many of the album's tracks connecting to the adequate lyrical content. As the listener, you will encounter songs with quite moderate lengths and some memorable sections during them; excluding the 6-minute closer "Revert to Stone," what with its cautiously drawn out outroduction. Perhaps one of Thine Eyes Bleed's best points is just how consistent everything is: the drumming normally has a rhythmic, tinnish vibe and the guitars are very thunderous. Johnny Araya - the band's bassist (and the brother of Slayer frontman Tom Araya) - is fairly quiet within the mix, though he keeps up with the rest of the band in no time at all.

The CD's instrumentation is, as this review mentioned earlier, almost always on track and demonic. The guitar playing managed throughout the album is slick and delivers good ol' crunches, particularly on "The Dragon," "Truth in Evil," and "Mouth of Hell". This album's drum work is rather precise, never actually burning so much as it is crashing. Beyond that, however, the percussion doesn't showcase very much and, believe it or not, has a minor issue sometimes with maintaining power when a song deserves it most. Justin Wolfe's vocal performance on Thine Eyes Bleed will send chills down even a spine that belongs to a mutated crow; and no, this group's vocalist isn't a squawking lunatic. This dude's screams add to the apocalyptically rough sounds pouring in and out of the record. If anything, his bellows become terrifying moreso on the song "Dark White" where there are additional growls provided by Kittie's leading lady Morgan Lander, who Wolfe is also engaged to.

Its production values certainly speak a volume or two about Thine Eyes Bleed and their second release. The full-length effort's mixing features little clipping aside from brief hiccups, and one song in the form of the instrumental "Mota Diablo" uses the grandiose recording to its advantage. Simultaneously, though, the album's syrupy quality could be a hindrance due to how truly indestructible everything is. Indeed, these are one of those cases where you wish a few mistakes were thrown in for the sake of making Thine Eyes Bleed a bit less robotic. Fortunately, the production is the least of the CD's problems; heck, the predicaments are barely anywhere to be noticed!

At the end of the sorrowful evening transiting into an incorrigible night, Justin Wolfe and company have hit the motherload upon the launch of their self-titled offering. Assuming you don't always want something outlandish or groundbreaking, and are interested in hearing copious amounts of nicely-done songwriting tagging along with an album that won't sweat the small stuff, Thine Eyes Bleed is the right kind of album to immerse yourself in.



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