Nothing
Guilty of Everything


4.0
excellent

Review

by MisterTornado CONTRIBUTOR (47 Reviews)
March 1st, 2014 | 252 replies | 16,632 views


Release Date: 03/04/2014 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Eclipsing history and influence

Throughout the last few years, a number of new acts have been shaping a compelling resurgence of the Shoegaze and Dream Pop that spawned in the latter half of the 80s and into the early 90s. Standouts amongst this affair include Merchandise, No Joy, Technicolor Teeth, Whirr, Tamaryn, Nights, and Vestals. Although it’s important to note that “resurgence” is a fleeting way to examine this recent musical happening, because to suggest that this sound is nothing more than a revival of the sound unearthed by pioneers such as My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain, or Slowdive is to ignorantly overlook the creativity and potential for a new generation of artists. It also suggests that this sound is merely a product of time, and anybody who attempts to build upon it is devoid of originality or talent, which is to completely ignore the idea of taking a preexisting idea and exposing it within a new and unique context.

A fine example of this idea is Nothing, a band who on their debut album Guilty of Everything, extend upon preexisting frames of sound, like the ghostly melancholy of Slowdive and the noisy dissonance of The Jesus and Mary Chain, and engrave themselves as a singular and concrete entity within it. Launching out of this etching is the gentle and swaying chords of ‘Hymn To The Pillory’, painting a picture of moonlit mellowness before instantly obscuring into thick blankets of cloudy noise. Subsequently ‘Dig’ follows this steam through simultaneously quiet and loud sounds, as vocalist Domenic Palermo’s ethereal drenched vocals contrast the immense guitar drones and blasting percussive penetration. This is a common theme throughout Guilty of Everything, balancing seemingly inconsistent sonic measures, bound to their own weightless and conflicting logic, that effortlessly glide through heaven and hell.

Amongst diversity of range within single tracks, assortment of style from track to track is something Nothing also embrace throughout the record. Out of the menacing, distorted embers of ‘Bent Nail’, Nothing transform into fully fledged melodic punk band, with forceful textures and a speedier structure that’s also explored later on ‘Get Well’, until around the half-way point when they breakdown and dismantle the swiftness and vaporize the grieving flames into the celestial blue. Many of the tracks throughout Guilty of Everything resemble a sound that is far more cinematic and grandiose than most of their contemporaries, concluded by the raging abundance of crash symbols and towering guitar drones. This quality is best heard on the theatrical ‘B&E’, as splashes of percussion and crushing distortion incidentally scores a whimsical narrative, before constructing itself into a blistering sky scraper of chaotic drum fills and intense guitar howls that take the song beyond the cinema screen.

Living in an age of modernity, when we’re given a such unique opportunity to flip through the pages of time and examine so many different styles of music, why are so many new bands thrown aside and cast away to doom and irrelevance as merely impersonators of an established sound? This embrace, extension, and melting of sounds, no matter what era they were spawned, is something that should be celebrated rather than criticized. With Guilty of Everything, Nothing prove that established sounds such as Shoegaze and Dream Pop, and influence in general, is purely a product of the listener. What ultimately matters is how we react to music beyond the constrains of age old definition and its place in history, through how these sounds makes us feel in the present. And right now, Guilty of Everything is the sound of a band magnificently balancing distinctive styles, simplistic and turbulent structures, and harsh and dreamy textures that eclipses history, influence, and definition.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 1st 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Fuck the past.

Stream it: http://www.npr.org/2014/02/23/279147672/first-listen-nothing-guilty-of-everything

sixdegrees
March 1st 2014



16917 Comments


nice, have a feeling this is gonna be a grower.

Digging: Ted Nugent - Shutup&jam!

Rev
March 1st 2014



9404 Comments


tight review dude


you're on fire lately, keep it up!

spookynewghostfriend
March 1st 2014



3325 Comments


x}

ShitsofRain
March 1st 2014



5854 Comments


sounds like my cup of tea

sniper
March 1st 2014



19048 Comments


yeah this rules

Mad.
March 1st 2014



3695 Comments


Coo review, might check this

Digging: Anubis - Hitchhiking to Byzantium

Rhyme
March 1st 2014



995 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

love the first paragraph great review dude

Digging: Morbus Chron - Sweven

FelixCulpa
March 1st 2014



1239 Comments


Sweet review man (As was your Gin City review!). Found this to be quite enjoyable on the first go around.

pmmets07
March 1st 2014



5865 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

oh hell yeah can't wait to listen to this

TheBarber
March 1st 2014



1834 Comments


Loved this line: "This embrace, extension, and melting of sounds, no matter what era they were spawned, is something that should be celebrated rather than criticized."

Awesome review, didn't know about these guys and I'm digging it a lot atm, cheers!


Digging: Interpol - El Pintor

bloc
March 1st 2014



34768 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Pretty good stuff

Digging: Interpol - El Pintor

Atari
Contributing Reviewer
March 1st 2014



19668 Comments


MisterTornado inching his way closer to dat staff spot.

bach
March 1st 2014



12331 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

need to check this out. downward years to come ruled so hard.

Digging: Orange - Orange

MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 1st 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Everybody also needs to check out No Joy's Pastel and Pass Out EP. Came out least year but it's easily some of the best Shoegaze out there at the moment

Deadwing42
March 5th 2014



136 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

This album is really really good, everyone should listen

McMegaMountain
March 5th 2014



198 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Great album.

Athom
Staff Reviewer
March 5th 2014



17204 Comments

Album Rating: 3.6

I like this record but the heavy edge from Downward Years to Come is missing. I always thought what separated Nothing from most of the current crop of nu-gaze bands was how where the average shoegaze band is soft and contemplative on recording, Downward Years to Come felt just as loud and consuming as their live show (which is truly something to experience). Guilty of Everything gives that up. The music begs to be listened to as loud as possible but the production is so soft.

MisterTornado
Contributing Reviewer
March 5th 2014



4507 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

While I agree its not as heavy as the EP, I disagree that it "gives that up" altogether. There's plenty of loud moments here; that chunky riff on 'Hymn To The Pillory' sounds more metal than noise rock, 'Bent Nail' and 'Get Well' blend punk undertones into the ethereal production, and 'B&E''s cinematic scope builds into something quite massive. Those are all things your not going to hear amongst Nothing's contemporaries.

sniper
March 5th 2014



19048 Comments


plus songs like "dig" just fucking rule, heavy or not



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