Premiata Forneria Marconi
The World Became The World


4.0
excellent

Review

by NightmareCinema16 USER (36 Reviews)
September 8th, 2013 | 12 replies


Release Date: 1974 | Tracklist

Review Summary: For the Third Time, P.F.M gets it right.

As a music listener, it should grow more obvious that progressive rock isn't just limited to one country. Yes, for the longest time most of the prominent albums of the 1970s prog age came from the U.K. But, to forget what other countries throughout the world have done for prog rock is just as important. Germany's Magma brought new concepts to the genre while Canada's Rush brought power to it. But there was one musical group that was able to craft a prog rock masterpiece. In Italy, no less. That band was Premiata Forneria Marconi.

The group was able to receive its own critical acclaim from superb works such as Storia di un Minuto and Per un Amico. The next two albums wouldn't be nearly as impressive, but then for a third time, P.F.M would regain lost ground in its fifth studio album, The World Became the World. Right now, I would say "un lavoro ben fatto."

The World Became the World was an album in which P.F.M. did what few prog rock bands could do at the time. Effectively use classical themes. The dark, haunting choral sections of The Mountain, and the acoustic guitar playing of Franco Mussida throughout the album is proof of it. They also increased the accessibility of many different musical themes and yet still were able to properly display technical virtuosity. For example, P.F.M takes on the traditional side of prog rock in songs like Just Look Away and The World Became the World. In a counterpart twist, the group is still able to pique the listener's interest in songs such as the complex, mind-spinning Four Holes in the Ground, the frantic jazz fusionesque Have Your Cake and Beat It, and the catchy, upbeat rock ballad Is My Face on Straight?. Just two simple ways that the Italian sound of The World Became the World was a unique comeback effort.

The success of this album also was critical through the work of each of the band members. The biggest success was the vocal chemistry of the group, along with the crisp lead vocals of Flavio Premoli and Mussida. It really added to the overall tone and sound of the album, making it more interesting. Though, I suppose the vocalists already had a head start. The lyrics of this album were written by Ex-King Crimson lyricist, Pete Sinfield, which was an excellent decision. It's no wonder why the lyrics of the album also sounded impressive. The rest of the group completes it with agile woodwind playing from Mauro Pagani, the beautifully melodic keyboard sections by Premoli, the stark drumming of Franz Di Cioccio, and the groovy bass lines, cheers to newly acquired Jan Patrick Djivas. That was the power of P.F.M's technically instrumental assets.

In good short, The World Became the World returned P.F.M to the familiar grounds of success and acclaim. It also helped them build onto their current instrumental structure, advance in style, and craft something that prog rock fans could once again enjoy. To say the least: "questa opera d'arte รจ la pena un giro."

4.2/5



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user ratings (12)
Chart.
4.1
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
NightmareCinema16
September 8th 2013


2016 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

It's been a while since I progged, so my writing my be a little rusty. Nevertheless, I hope it mostly looks good. I suppose translation might not be 100% accurate either.

NightmareCinema16
September 8th 2013


2016 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Yes, all across the world, no less. I'll be starting in Italy. :]

CaptainDooRight
September 8th 2013


29132 Comments


omfg Pos'd didn't even read yet

Digging: Kangding Ray - Solens Arc

Jethro42
September 8th 2013


12440 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

The next two albums wouldn't be nearly as impressive

L'Isola di Niente is more or less the Italian version of The World Became the World
Apart from this, great review. It's pleasant to see a PFM review.

NightmareCinema16
September 8th 2013


2016 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Ok, that makes more since to me. Four Holes in the Ground rules.

MrSirLordGentleman
September 8th 2013


4405 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Never been a fan of the english PFM so I prefer L'Isola di Niente over this, but it's still a pretty good album

Digging: Nina Simone - Pastel Blues

beefshoes
September 8th 2013


3887 Comments


Awesome.
Haven't heard this but I love Per Un Amico.

Digging: CHVRCHES - The Bones of What You Believe

Jethro42
September 8th 2013


12440 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Never been a fan of the english PFM so I prefer L'Isola di Niente over this, but it's still a pretty good album

Yeah but L'Isola Di Niente doesnt have song The World Became the World (found in Italian version as ''Impressioni di Settember'' from Storia di un Minuto)
The English version rules;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvjssJ7RRLM



MrSirLordGentleman
September 8th 2013


4405 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Yeah, the english version of Impressioni di Settembre is an excellent song, it doesn't have the signature sound of the PFM but it is certainly awesome

NightmareCinema16
September 8th 2013


2016 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

eh, I prefer the English version myself. I can better relate to it.

menawati
Contributing Reviewer
September 9th 2013


16023 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

nice one, pos, i like the italian version better tho

Digging: iamthemorning - Belighted

NightmareCinema16
September 9th 2013


2016 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Thanks. I am once again beginning to appreciate Italian prog.



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