Daddy Yankee
Barrio Fino En Directo


3.0
good

Review

by Mr. Lean Mug USER (112 Reviews)
March 25th, 2006 | 52 replies | 21,177 views


Release Date: 2005 | Tracklist


3 of 3 thought this review was well written

Picture yourself back in the summer of 2005. It�s hot. It�s muggy. It�s uncomfortable. All of the sudden, like a flash of heat-lightening and a clap of thunder, a song comes blasting out of a stereo. That song is �Gasolina� and it is the hit single of one of the most popular stars in the rising genre of reggaeton, Daddy Yankee.

Raymond Ayala was born on February 3, 1977 in Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico. After a hard childhood that culminated in a severe leg injury, Ayala would become the infamous Daddy Yankee. Gaining headway with an early 90s partnership with reggaeton pioneer, Playero DJ, Daddy would quickly become a smash success in his homeland of Puerto Rico. Over the next fifteen years, he would go on to record several albums that have sold well over one million copies in Puerto Rico alone. In 2004, he would gain accolades in the United States and Europe as the single (�Gasolina�) from his latest album Barrio Fino fired up the charts.

Several million copies of Barrio Fino later, we find ourselves looking at another version of this album. That would be Barrio Fino En Directo. This latest album contains many songs from Barrio Fino itself, as well as tracks from previous Daddy Yankee albums and several previously unreleased recordings.

Barrio Fino En Directo showcases a harder side of the Latin dance music, reggaeton. Truthfully, it draws more comparisons to modern day hip-hop than anything else. Also truthfully, when stacked against modern day hip-hop, this live album races ahead of the pack.

Recorded from concerts in locales ranging from New York City, to Los Angeles, to San Juan, Puerto Rico, or the Dominican Republic, Barrio Fino En Directo is something of a �worldly� experience. In addition to the actual music, Barrio Fino En Directo also includes a bonus DVD with behind-the-scenes footage, interviews, and music videos.

Barrio Fino En Directo starts off with the �En Directo� intro track. It sets the mood for the live set to come. Cheering fans and developing music foreshadow a strong climax. Then, Daddy Yankee�s voice is heard to announce his arrival to Puerto Rico. This cuts into �King Daddy,� the next track. The first to feature Daddy�s spanglish rhymes and penchant to use ambitious music, �King Daddy� is a hard, powerful way to introduce this collection. �Dale Caliente,� starts of with some nice instrumentation that cuts into some hard rapping (complete with women!). I couldn�t help but find myself dancing along to the salsa meets rap flavor of this song. �El Empuja� adds something like a middle-eastern beat to the mish-mash. �Tu Principe� which features the vocals of Latin reggaeton stars Zion Y Lennox is a softer change of pace. This is one of the better songs to be featured on this collection; it has a smoother, more R&B feel to it.

�Santifica Tus Escapularios,� features more of that salsa/middle-eastern melting pot that seems to treat Daddy so well. Straight up spanglish rapping make this another most listen from this collection. �Corazones� is a strong (almost arrogantly so) track with powerful music and hard rapping. This song basically says to you, �Get up on a stage and freestyle. Don�t care if you look like an idiot, because you�re doing it for the music.� Now that may sound silly, but that�s my assessment. �No Me Dejes Solo,� is a smooth, lyrical song. This is evidenced mostly by Daddy�s stopping to allow the crowd to sing along. It continues En Directo�s tendency to go from hardcore rapping to softer, more pop-like songs.

Next up we have the pure salsa beat of �Lo Que Paso, Paso.� This song is just wonderful. It�s amazingly catchy as well as just fun to listen to. It also showcases Daddy�s ability to write a song that sounds like Latin music (which is a very good thing). This probably the second best track on the album.

Hmm? What�s this? We have a pause with some random noise. This can only mean one thing: This next song is the one we�ve all been waiting for. Daddy Yankee�s international smash-hit, �Gasolina.� As the singing rings out �Dad-dy Yan-kee!� you know that the time has come. �Gasolina� is a fairly weak song to begin with. I can understand why it did so well, but when you stack it up against all the other music En Directo offers, it seems to pale in comparison. Still, the live version is fairly loyal to its studio-recorded counterpart. I wouldn�t be surprised if I heard this come blasting out of some random stereo as I walk down the streets,

Next, En Directo goes to its studio-recorded, previously unreleased tracks. The first of these is that salsa core �Rompe.� This song is decent at best, and certainly appears to be the target of Daddy�s promotional department recently. �Muchacando,� is a much more impressive display of these recordings. It�s hardcore to the maximum. Daddy comes out singing and rapping in high-speed over his Spanish, Latin, and English vocal lines.

En Directo peaks with the next song, �Gangsta Zone.� Featuring the legendary Snoop Dogg, this song is the closest to sounding like a true hip-hop song. Catchy, powerful, and at 3:33 concise, �Gangsta Zone� represents the best that this album has to offer. This song has been playing on repeat in my head for several months, and I recommend it first and foremost to people seeking to look into Daddy Yankee.

�Machete Reloaded,� is a remix of Daddy�s song �Machete,� featuring Houston super-rapper Paul Wall. I�m not particularly fond of Paul Wall, or this track for that matter. En Directo has much better to offer than this inane drivel. The skit �Como Dice Que Dijo� and the song �El Truco,� end this collection. It�s actually a kind of odd way to go out, what with the accordion beats and all. Still, the catchy lyrics and talk of �mambo� make it a decent way to end a good album.

As for the DVD, that�s fairly open to interpretation. It�s a freebie so don�t expect anything amazing: A photo album, some behind-the scenes interviews and looks, as well as several music videos make up this disc.

Reggaeton is on the rise, and it�s safe to say that Daddy Yankee is leading the charge. I would highly recommend looking into this album above any studio album of his, as it encompasses most of his best work. Surprisingly, this is very nice for being live. Perhaps that�s Daddy�s element. All in all this is a solid collection of recordings, and the inclusion of �Gangsta Zone� makes sampling this collection all the more worthwhile.



Pros:
Fun music, easy to dance to (as reggaeton is intended to be)
Excellent mixture of past and present tracks
�Gangsta Zone�

Cons:
Some tracks vary too greatly to sound well in their presentation on the CD
Bonus songs and DVD are lackluster on the whole



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user ratings (43)
Chart.
1.6
very poor

Comments:Add a Comment 
Electric City
Staff Reviewer
March 25th 2006



15727 Comments


Daddy Yankee is fairly good, but I see him as another brash Reggaeton artist who over a generic latin beat says "REGGAETON!" a lot among some mindless dribble.

Digging: Alvvays - Alvvays

pulseczar
March 25th 2006



2385 Comments


Reggaeton is way too overrated by North American culture as something innovative. It follows pretty much the same beat with cheesy choruses. But I like how other artists lightly incorporate it into their music.

TojesDolan
March 25th 2006



271 Comments


Ahaha, I never thought this was going to happen at MX. You know, reggaeton.

Anyhow, I've listened to random bits of this new trend because of my sister and some of my friends, and I tend to be pulled into the never-ending spiral of hot beats.

Musically, reggaeton in general doesn't do anything for me. Nonetheless, I get struck by some beats in particular songs for instance "Dale caliente" or "Gasolina", that just have the very, very over-used background beat for hip-hop, but catch me for some reason.

Good review, interesting project this man has in his hands. The trend will die eventually, but at least it was good while it lasted.

DFelon204409
Emeritus
March 25th 2006



3995 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

Reggaeton is one of the dumbest genres to be commericalized ever. The same beat of dotted quarter, quarter, quarter is present on every song. I can't stand this fad.

TojesDolan
March 25th 2006



271 Comments


There's some catchiness here or there, Dfelon.

Maybe you're listening to the same song over and over again. :p

It's just meant to be catchy, with latin/hip-hop fusion, or something like that. First I though it would be like Reggae, but I fail to see why it's named "reggaeton".

I'd send you some semi-catchy beats. But I have none in my computer at the moment. And you'd more likely reject them. :p

DFelon204409
Emeritus
March 25th 2006



3995 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

I'm not listening to the same song on repeat. I'm listening to the reggaeton channel here in the Bay Area. So repetitive. I had to listen to this CD on repeat on a boat tour in Turkey. It was truly miserable. Also, in Turkey their "Gasolina" music video has two fatter guys lip syncing "Gasolina" proving to me that this song was made by a record company to earn money and shouldn't even be review under the name Daddy Yankee.

Diabulus in musica
March 25th 2006



485 Comments


reggaeton??whyyyyyyyyyyyy.......reggaeton should be use as a way of torture, its so damm awfull

NEDM
March 26th 2006



1113 Comments


Reggaeton is on the rise in South Florida.

So is the Caucasian suicide rate.

pulseczar
March 26th 2006



2385 Comments


It's popularity in Central America and Mexico was astounding when i went there in the summer. My Floydian buddies there started listening to it non-stop, leaving me with my Dark Side of the Moon sing-a-longs alone ;_;

"Freshly Baked"
March 27th 2006



583 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

Dun-Da-Dun-Da (Reapeat 26 Times, fill with brash lines in spanish)

There, there's every Raggaeton song ever made.

Raggaeton is trash, i have no clue how it over shadows other latin music, there's lots of great latin music, but this isn't it.

Krost
April 15th 2006



7 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Reggaeton is more than music.It's more Cultural than Musical, thats why many people dont understand it.

Iluvatar
Staff Reviewer
April 15th 2006



16081 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

Reggaeton Vs. Grunge: Battle of the music that is more than music, maaaaaaaaaaaaaan.

There is just no concievable way this can be above a 2. And no rational way it can be above a 1.5. Whatever happened to people listening to Ray Barretto? Thats some real latin music right there.This Message Edited On 04.15.06

Electric City
Staff Reviewer
April 15th 2006



15727 Comments


But musically, it's simple. I've heard the same beat that's in Nina Sky's big hit under minimally 4 other Reggaeton hits. Maybe I don't understand it, but if that dun-da-dun-dun repetition is worthy of a 5, I just don't get it.

Krost
April 15th 2006



7 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

There's a reason for the same Beat being repeated in other songs.Beats from the Carribean are borrowed to other artist. The Nina Sky Beat is actually made by one of Damien Marley's friends in Jamaica.Rap Does it.Rock Does it.

Iluvatar
Staff Reviewer
April 15th 2006



16081 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

But not every rap song, and I think every rock song, souns exactly the same. It's bland, and even the first time you hear it the beat blows anyways.

Krost
April 15th 2006



7 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Almost all Rock nowadays have a similar sound.Almost the only way that rap reuses beats is when they freestyle.This Message Edited On 04.15.06

Iluvatar
Staff Reviewer
April 15th 2006



16081 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

Krost, you're an idiot and need to stop posting if you think all rock sounds the same. Stop listening to Staind, Nickelback and Crossfade, listen to some real rock. and then comment on rock. Merely go to the rock section of the site if you want reccomendations on real music. AKA not reggaeton.

Krost
April 15th 2006



7 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

But not every rap song, and I think every rock song, souns exactly the same. It's bland, and even the first time you hear it the beat blows anyways.This Message Edited On 04.15.06

Iluvatar
Staff Reviewer
April 15th 2006



16081 Comments

Album Rating: 1.0

Rock songs dont feature beats. You = Lose at life. Unless you were repeating what I said, and in that case: Wtf are you talking about?
I've actually listened to the origins of reggaeton (I love wikipedia) like Black Apache and El General, and its just as bad as this is. Listen to more than the radio if you want to make general assumptions about any genre.

calgone
May 13th 2006



48 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

mm this album could be better but it's still good.
great review



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