Veil of Maya
All Things Set Aside


4.0
excellent

Review

by Keliohesten USER (3 Reviews)
February 22nd, 2013 | 149 replies


Release Date: 2006 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Maybe a solid reason not to hate deathcore.

I remember quite clearly the initial commercial outbreak of the deathcore genre in 2007, gaining popularity as it evolved from the Gothenburg influenced sound it originated with. An important year for the genre, Suicide Silence released the genre landmark “The Cleansing”, Whitechapel with their second release “This Is Exile”; Christian death metal act Impending Doom set loose “Nailed. Dead. Risen” and a personal favorite of mine being the Born of Osiris debut EP “The New Reign”. Deathcore bands, good or not, were being signed straight off MySpace it seemed and not too much critical acclaim for reasons we all know by now. But amongst the bombardment of breakdowns and Mitch Lucker imitators there were Veil of Maya and their debut “All Things Set Aside” which came first being released a year prior in 2006.

Veil of Maya can be described as a band for people who like to play metal or aspire to do so. Each member has put their raw emotion into this record (except the bassist who you shockingly can’t hear). Shrouded in this brutality is well thought out musicianship. Blending lo-fi production, wailing tremolo metalcore riffs (that are in no way stale on this record), a punkish feel to the tempo changes and drumming, a vocalist who doesn’t sound like Mitch Lucker (too many vocalist sound similar to Mitch and at this point it sounds unoriginal) and of course breakdowns.

Most deathcore is either produced very clean of is very gritty. Veil of Maya self produced this record and yes this is VERY gritty and me being a fan of black metal I enjoy it as it gives a real feeling to the music and an authentic heaviness. The guitarists drive the album forward while the drumming follows in close second. The vocals sound stuck in the middle of the chaos which allows you to focus on them or ignore them, though I don’t see why you would because the lyrics are insightful rather than childish. But enough about the production, you’ll love it or hate it just like the genre itself.

This is the only album featuring Adam Clemans on vocals and I prefer him over their next vocalist Brandon Butler. He puts a lot of emotion in to his high pitch screams and his lows are very assertive. Not sure which of the members wrote the lyrics but kudos to them for not writing about rape, murder and mutilation every three seconds. Some topics I’ve deciphered are deceit, suffering, misanthropy and more common everyday issues like liars and of course what is metal without at least touching on the subject of death. The closing track "The Session" was a surprise to me as it is a hip-hop song. Don’t be turned off by it, it is actually pretty interesting. The Chicago rappers featured on it do a good job of not being overly predictable in their verses and the driving beat isn’t by any means bad. We live in the age of hip-hop, so give it a listen.

The guitarists, Marc Okubo (lead), Bryan Ruppell (rhythm) and Kris Higler (bass) are influenced heavily by Meshuggah and by modern metalcore acts. The leads are both original and interesting to the point that I constantly replay the album to hear them be played again. This is deathcore so yes there is chugging. But don’t be fooled as it is not mindless; it is coordinated and pays respectable homage to Meshuggah unlike Oceano who overuse the single note open chord. The bassist is lost in the mix somewhere and never shines; he just gives a heavy feel to the album by following the other guitarists. I don’t recall a single lick, lead or groove climbing out of the mix. As for the drumming, Sammy Applebaum handles the sticks here and he gives a powerful show. A punk influenced death metal style that uses a surprising amount of fills that never go stale; he blasts only occasionally and pounds the double bass like he should. His beats are original and full of polyrhythmic ideas. He is technically proficient and most definitely a highlight of the album.

Overall a very enjoyable album for fans of deathcore, technical metal, melodic metalcore, Meshuggah and heavy intense music in general. An interesting listen if you want to understand how this band progressed into the band that released “[id]” in 2010 and “Eclipse” in 2012. The precursor to their more technical albums and a heavy and melodic album that predates the 2007 wave of deathcore.

Side note: I don’t know if they named themselves after the Cynic song or not but they aspire to be more technical than other deathcore acts so I believe they may have chosen that name for the sake of paying tribute to one of the esteemed forerunners in technical metal.


user ratings (212)
Chart.
3
good

Comments:Add a Comment 
Funeralopolis
February 22nd 2013


11894 Comments


great summary would read again

Digging: Owen Pallett - In Conflict

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Thank you sir

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

also Funeralopolis is a fantastic song

XingKing
February 22nd 2013


11078 Comments


Deathcore clearly exploded in '05, noob.

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

No. The only real credible release for the genre in '05 was Job for a Cowboy's "Doom". 2007 gave it commercial exposure.

Crymsonblaze
February 22nd 2013


7536 Comments


Deathcore blows

XingKing
February 22nd 2013


11078 Comments


Deathcore does indeed blow, but there are a few gems in the genre. Glass Casket reigns supreme!



Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Generic deathcore blows. bands like Oceano and Knights of the abyss. but there are way more gems than people care to search for

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

actually Oceano has a few nice tracks. 2 or 3 off of "Depths"

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

gotta love getting negged by alt rock and emo lovers.

Curse.
Contributing Reviewer
February 22nd 2013


8021 Comments


I remember quite clearly the initial outbreak of the deathcore genre in 2007.


what are you, twelve?

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

No im 18. was in high school when it brokeout.

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

No im 18. was in high school when it brokeout.

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

trust me im more a fan of morbid angel style death than deathcore. this just needed a review and i enjoy the album

XingKing
February 22nd 2013


11078 Comments


'07 would have made you 12 when it broke out, therefore not in high school. Neg'd for being a liar!!!









































































Just kidding.

Curse.
Contributing Reviewer
February 22nd 2013


8021 Comments


Deathcore didn't "breakout" in 2007 considering it had already been popular for years by then

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

do your math. i was 14 when i began that year of school. so congrats.
and i didnt metion its underground following from '05 to '07 i metioned its major label breakout. congrats again

Curse.
Contributing Reviewer
February 22nd 2013


8021 Comments


major label? oh man you are just digging yourself deeper and deeper

Keliohesten
February 22nd 2013


50 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

fused together in revolving doors was considered a major influence on deathcore at that time aswell since your digging it.

XingKing
February 22nd 2013


11078 Comments


That's what I'm saying. I remember sitting in freshman history class and jamming some Despised Icon, Elysia, the Faceless, Glass Casket, etc. and that was '05. Looking around, I'd still say '05-'06 was it's year. Especially '06.



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