Angra
Rebirth


3.5
great

Review

by King Henry VIII USER (63 Reviews)
January 31st, 2013 | 8 replies


Release Date: 2001 | Tracklist


Power metal is always going to be a hit or miss genre within the metal community. Oddly enough, if there’s a progressive touch added into the music we somehow or other get a wave of attention on the band’s critically acclaimed albums and accept them for who they are and not even bother with the rest of the genre. To me that’s just weird, because a lot of people are ignoring quite a few genre gems that way. But hey if that’s what it takes for people to appreciate or enjoy some power metal then so be it. One thing is for sure Angra is one of those special bands. In 1993 the band released Angels Cry that featured unique and distinguishable neo-classical elements from Kiko Loureiro and Rafael Bittencourt that had zero connection of influence from Yngwie Malmsteen. In 1996 Angra released a monster of a follow up with Holy Land by incorporating its known neo-classical elements with Brazilian folk. Unfortunately, Angra dismissed all characteristics two years later of what sculpted their sound and what made them a unique entity with Fireworks, which purely focused on a classic heavy metal style (more than the others). During the lethargic years of a world tour that was created by the unsettling chemistry within the band, Andre Matos, Lu*s Mariutti, and Ricardo Confessori left due to personal reasons. Although there was uncertainty for the band’s future Angra’s outgoing guitarists picked up some incredible replacements from other local bands. In essence, Angra sort of did go through a Rebirth.

From the start of Rebirth’s intro, “In Excelsis”, listeners will experience a rush of nostalgia for those who are familiar to Angra’s work. The intro also sooths right into “Nova Era” which portrays superb guitar work, awesome symphonic variations that get you feeling that you’re on a ***ing journey (at least I do), and arguably better vocal work from Edu Falaschi than of Angra’s previous singer, Andre Matos. “Millennium Sun” follows “Nova Era” with song writing that necessarily hasn’t been seen before – seems like a ballad at first, but slowly progresses into a mid-tempo power metal song – but “Millennium Sun” shows notable praise for its outstanding guitar solos as well as Edu’s ever growing comforting voice that will leave a positive experience for the listener.

Despite Angra’s ballad-esque songs that dominate most of their albums, Rebirth still shows that these Brazilians know how metal. As stated before “Nova Era” is one of those high-tempo power metal song that has made Angra famous. “Acid Rain”, “Judgment Day”, and “Running Alone” are some other songs that show Angra at their most, for lack of better words, “aggressive”. Whilst the main epic, “Unholy Wars (Part I - Imperial Crown / Part II - Forgiven Return)”, is without a doubt a must listen but I have to warn the listener as to not turn it off within the first minute and a half; the intro may seem out of place (which it is) but the rest of the song is definitely worth your while.

So far I’ve basically described a big chunk of what the listener will experience with Rebirth. The rest of the album are ballads; ballads that are notably riddled with classic Angra composure. In “Heroes of Sand” we see a magnificent arrangement of a soothing, yet complex acoustic passage that’s layered underneath Edu’s singing. The song also jumps right into the whole epic and symphonic composition that many Angra Fans are accustomed to. While its brother song, “Rebirth”, in so many ways are structured the same, both songs are still relaxing and enjoyable nonetheless. “Visions Prelude” is the ending ballad which was adapted from Chopin’s Op.28 No. 20 in C minor, the song itself isn’t a highlight by any means but it sure does end the album on a decent note.

In conclusion, Rebirth brings Angra back to form after the failed musical approach on Fireworks. The album has plenty of classics, plenty of solos, plenty of unique acoustic passages, plenty of hooks to remember, and most importantly a perfect match with the new members. Rebirth is a must have for any power metal fan and obviously any fan of Angra.

Recommended songs:
Nova Era
Heroes of Sand
Acid Rain



Recent reviews by this author
Edguy Space Police - Defenders of the CrownPowerwolf Preachers of the Night
Dark Tranquillity ConstructGamma Ray Master of Confusion
Stratovarius NemesisIn the Silence A Fair Dream Gone Mad
user ratings (123)
Chart.
3.9
excellent
other reviews of this album
Robert Davis CONTRIBUTOR (4)
Even though the title is "Rebirth", it is clear with one listen that the album is anything but a com...


Comments:Add a Comment 
FictionalFlames
January 31st 2013


1517 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I swear to god I wrote this review last week during my ban.

Unfortunately, somebody beat me to it yesterday..... oh well, the more the merrier, and more promotion!

linguist2011
Contributing Reviewer
January 31st 2013


1922 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Good review man.


Digging: Execration (NOR) - Morbid Dimensions

KILL
January 31st 2013


72280 Comments


their first 2 are great, will check this

Digging: Throwing Muses - Throwing Muses

FictionalFlames
January 31st 2013


1517 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Kill you should check out Temple of Shadows as well.

@linguist2011 thanks man!

Keyblade
January 31st 2013


15392 Comments


yea definitely check Temple. pos'd btw.

Digging: Fen - Carrion Skies

FrozenVain
January 31st 2013


2482 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Very good review. I really agree with the first paragraph.

CaptainDooRight
January 31st 2013


30334 Comments


hoooooooooooollllllllllllllyyyyyyyyyyy lllllllllaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnddddddddd


dam wrong al but pos

KjSwantko
January 31st 2013


9448 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0 | Sound Off

lol



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2014 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy