Starflyer 59
Talking Voice vs. Singing Voice


4.0
excellent

Review

by donovan909 USER (22 Reviews)
December 19th, 2011 | 9 replies | 2,253 views


Release Date: 2005 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A veteran band releases a career making album.

2 of 2 thought this review was well written

For those unfamiliar with Starflyer 59, they have quietly flown below the radar for two decades despite offers from major labels. Originating in the early 90's in the infancy of the radical changes undergoing the Christian music market, they helped lead the way to original, artistic development in the stale, lackluster category of contemporary Christian Music

It is extremely unfortunate that they got pigeonholed because of their affiliation with the Christian scene, as they were above and beyond anything getting released in the entire indie scene for most of their career. The singer-guitarist, Jason Martin, is the soul of Starflyer 59, with an ever revolving door of bassists, drummers, and keyboard players.

Starting out as a very dreary, distortion-drenched shoe-gazer band, paying heavy dues to bands such as My Bloody Valentine and The Pixies, Starflyer 59 took a few years and several albums to truly realize their own sound and potential. However, on Talking Voice Vs Singing Voice, not only did they hit their stride, they hit it hard. The songs on this album are almost unbelievable. It took quite a few listens to really soak in how brilliant the songwriting on this album is, not to mention the production. If a band like The Strokes brought back that 80’s garage rock vibe, then Starflyer 59 brought back the beauty of the striking rainy day vibe of bands like New Order.

Mixed by Ken Andrews of Failure/Year of the Rabbit fame, it is clean, crisp, and spacious, allowing every little nuance to shine through in the mix. The trademark, mellow, contemplative vocals of Jason Martin carry like a soft whisper through the gentle power of this record. It plays much like Dark Side of the Moon, with its gentle acoustic guitars, pristine and dreamy electrics, and abundant keyboard flourishes throughout. The bass and drums never really shine through in any fashion, yet rather, hold a solid, firm establishment for Martin to craft eclectic guitar riffs and soft-spoken vocals.

From beginning to end, this album is easily playable, without having to skip a track, the type of album that feels good to put in and just let go to. Not to say that in a negative sense by any stretch of the imagination, the chill mood that this album evokes in not just background music, it is meditative, surreal, and comforting, much like latter-day Radiohead or Sigur Ros. I would be tempted to give this album an almost perfect score, but not every song stands up to high standards a perfect score commands. There are quite a few tracks that simply do not grab your attention, while there are others, that make you want to hit the repeat button quite a few times.

I am not keen on giving track by track descriptions, but I feel the need to throw a few out there, that are quite noteworthy. Track #3, ‘All Good Sons’ is a pumping, energetic song driven by an amazing guitar riff that is a throwback to the upbeat tunes by bands such as New Oder. Then you have soft spoken pieces such a ‘Softness, Goodness’ and ‘NifghtLife’ that have a vibe reminding me of a songs like 'Comfortably Numb' without ever crossing over the boundary of stealing ideas or replicating the songs.

For any Starflyer59 fan, this is a must-have and for those just now discovering the band, this album is a fine start for you to to begin falling in love with the band and their catalog.



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user ratings (22)
Chart.
4
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
December 19th 2011



31047 Comments


Be careful about posting a certain amount of reviews one after the other. All you're doing is knocking more people off the front page while replacing them with more of your own

Digging: Marcel Dettmann - Fabric 77

Eko
December 19th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Yes, finally a sf59 review! I prefer Dial M and Old to this though. Pos'd.

donovan909
December 19th 2011



22 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Deviant: Apologize for the two reviews in a row, I will make sure I take my time getting my reviews out there and spread them out, so everyone can get theirs posted and read. Thanks!!

Masochist
December 19th 2011



7997 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Starflyer 59 is criminally underrated. Can't believe someone actually posted a review for them. This is my favorite album by them, except for perhaps 'Dial M'. And "Easy Street" is definitely my favorite SF59 song.

Digging: He Is Legend - Heavy Fruit

Eko
December 19th 2011



2119 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I've been meaning to do some sf59 reviews, might do Dial M over the break if I get the chance.

GermanSchools
December 26th 2011



23 Comments


Thanks for writing this review! It's about time Starflyer 59 got out there. I've always thought about writing one, and it never seemed so possible until now. Thank you so much!


Spec
December 26th 2012



27102 Comments


So this is the place to start then?

EDIT: My post was exactly a year later from the last one. Weird.

Digging: Rinoa - An Age Among Them

Minus.
December 26th 2012



2680 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Silver is the Best album, but they are all really excellent.

skoopy48
December 26th 2012



1471 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Their first few albums are really harder and more shoegaze. They got more indie with the fashion focus. Depending on what you like is what you should start with. My persanol favorite is Leave here a stranger but this one is really good too.



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