Fatboy Slim
You've Come a Long Way, Baby


4.0
excellent

Review

by Will Forest USER (23 Reviews)
December 14th, 2011 | 11 replies


Release Date: 1998 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Norman has done it again, nothing more to say.

Fatboy Slim of the complete origin was originally established among a threshold of mastered big beat artists. But for the terms of Fatboy Slim, the overall genre was a matter of managing to find the heaviest way to complete the catchiest songs, and keep the audience intact. To do this, Fatboy Slim's first album in 1996 "Better Living through Chemistry", really established a complete and orderly sound for the man behind the genius, known only as Norman Quentin Cook. This man's superiority in his genre has put forth a grand assortment of fantastic sounds that employ various aspects of heaviness, and maintaining that awe striking sound of backbeats and hardcore distortions.

The whole album "You've Come a Long Way, Baby" revolves around some pretty basic aspects of big beat. Pioneering his genre at the tip of his career, this album exemplifies a true understanding of just how rich in taste this man really is. As top priority for maintain the audience after a shocking debut, the rusty formula for the rough standards big beat shows us, is to attack a more vulnerable side of the music. This album perfects this by showing the audience how to reinvent a superior sound, without overdoing it out of existence. These aspects that save albums day and night, are first seen in the first hit single 'The Rockafeller Skank' which is a twisted combination of various sounds all over the place.

The mess of sounds in this album has commercially exploited itself as one of the most highly acclaimed albums of all time. The mass proportion of creativity in this album is the saving grace from doing nothing more than recreating a second debut. The heaviness here, including songs like '***ing in Heaven', and 'Build it Up - Tear It Down' show mass amounts of imagination the Cook is so good at showing. His performances never fail to disappoint in 'Gangster Tripping' and 'Praise You', which have amazingly catchy hooks that drag you right into the song like a magnet. Most other songs in here are of similar aspects, but do well in providing some switch-ups in the back beats, and the hooks are substantial here as well. Not to mention the superior executing of vocals in here, that provides some good backdrops for the beats. The distorted vocals in this album also provide some highly acclaimed excitement to this formula in a near perfect display.

Fatboy Slim, or Norman Cook, has put together one of the most appreciated albums of all time, and shows no sign by the end of the record of slowing down. This conclusion can be drawn up from the simple fact that Fatboy Slim has created two albums now that compile some more of the catchy hooks and dragged the audience all around with it. The major difference with this album is that it influences a wider variety of people with a much more substantial variety of sounds to experiment with all along the album. The whole time this is going on, the vocals are right there in your face creating a decent sound that most will appreciate.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
linkjerk
December 14th 2011


311 Comments


Still open to any advice if you have any. Please provide me with some feedback.

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
December 14th 2011


31628 Comments


Some of the phrasing is a little awkward here and there, bit for the most part this is a solid review. I'm always happy when people bother to use the proper terminology as well. Also:

known only as Norman Quentin Cook.


Why "only"? People normally reserve "known only as" or "simply known as" when the artist doesn't reveal his full name etc

Digging: Theo Parrish - American Intelligence

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
December 14th 2011


31628 Comments


I would also suggest that you expand on some of the ideas presented here. For example:

These aspects that save albums day and night, are first seen in the first hit single 'The Rockafeller Skank' which is a twisted combination of various sounds all over the place.


Give an example here instead of just saying it has a mixture of different sounds. Granted that's a track that everyone is probably familiar with, but talk about the surf guitar in the track etc. How 'You're Not From Brighton' and 'Gangster Trippin' are more hip hop inspired

linkjerk
December 14th 2011


311 Comments


ok, thanks

Restrikted
December 14th 2011


1889 Comments


This album rocks hard. Acid 8000 is insane

linkjerk
December 14th 2011


311 Comments


yeah yeah yeyeyeyeye...yeyey yeah

DuMont
December 14th 2011


84 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Awesome review, Kalifornia is such a banger

linkjerk
December 14th 2011


311 Comments


thats true

Cipieron
December 14th 2011


3508 Comments


loved this album back in the day. one of the first albums i bought with my own money.

linkjerk
December 14th 2011


311 Comments


i remember my first album i bought, oh dear, it was Papa Roach: Metamorphosis - what can i say? its a guilty pleasure of mine

KILL
December 14th 2011


72280 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

one of my first albums good times

Digging: Throwing Muses - Throwing Muses



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