James Blake
James Blake


4.5
superb

Review

by LudditeStereo USER (26 Reviews)
May 23rd, 2011 | 24 replies | 4,550 views


Release Date: 2011 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Amidst the deconstruction and uneasy silences are moments of clarity, where the fractured pieces briefly align and you’re rewarded with subtle, breathtaking beauty.

6 of 6 thought this review was well written

The human mind craves order, and as much as electronic artist James Blake excels in creating edginess and imbalance in his music, what makes him exceptional is his ability to underpin the proceedings with deep, resonating patterns. Blake doesn’t create conventional pop music " he employs warbling distortion, oddly timed cut-aways, glitch-ridden piano loops, and a near-complete lack of verse-chorus arrangements. In many of the songs on his eponymous debut, there are long, pregnant pauses between notes, lending even the gentlest of sounds a sense of massive potential, like heavy objects raised high and poised to fall. But amidst the deconstruction and uneasy silences are moments of clarity, where the fractured pieces briefly align and you’re rewarded with subtle, breathtaking beauty.

As an up and coming dubstep producer, Blake’s been at the center of a sonic movement (detailed more fully in Pitchfork article New Vocabulary) that began in 2007 with Burial’s landmark album Untrue, in which ghostly vocal samples are spliced over beats and ambient electronics. While he’s only 22, Blake’s prowess in the studio is well-documented on EP’s The Bells Sketch, CMYK and Klavierwerke. But what makes James Blake truly stand out from previous efforts is the discovery that he’s been carrying a secret weapon inside his coat " that voice.

Blake’s emergence as an R&B crooner is nothing short of a revelation. Soulful, blue-eyed, and emboldened with a sense of aching beyond his years, his voice is one of the great ones; the comparison may seem brash, but consider if Radiohead began their career with a few EPs containing instrumentals similar to “Kid A” and “TreeFingers,” then decided to let Thom Yorke unleash his pipes as an afterthought on album #2. It’s that kind of ace up the sleeve that Blake’s got. It’s like he’s just been practicing with other people’s vocal samples on his EPs as a way of saying: “I can create this kind of tension with anything I find lying around in the record bin. I just wanted to let you know that before I sing my ass off.”

Perhaps the most remarkable quality of Blake’s voice is its malleability. Like liquid, it conforms to the space that it’s given. Alongside the acoustic guitar riff on “Lindisfarne, Pt. 2”, it recalls the pained longing of Bon Iver, when paired with “Limit To Your Love’s” sumptuous piano chords, it achieves Bryan Ferry’s effortless romanticism, and when placed within “Give Me My Month’s” baroque confines, it assumes Antony Hegarty’s unearthly timbre. Blake intuitively seems to know when to push his range, and when to reel it in; for every time he distorts and electronically modulates his vocals to add to your sense of disquietude, he finds the right moments when to leave it bare (“Limit To Your Love”) for devastating emotional effect.

While often enigmatic, the album’s lyrics teem with a sense of estrangement and sadness. On aptly-titled “I Never Learnt to Share” Blake reveals: “My brother and my sister don’t speak to me/ But I don’t blame them,” while on “Lindisfarne pt. 1,” Blake painfully wonders “Won’t tomorrow come?” And although aforementioned “Limit To Your Love” is a cover of a Feist song, Blake distills the original to its sensual, mournful essence, making the message all his own. It serves as the album’s taut, emotional center.

But the stand out track here is “The Wilhem Scream.” Rarely does the song of the year come out in February, but it’s hard to believe anything will top it. Over a bed of slinking, hazy synthesizers, Blake cries: “I don’t know about my dreams/I don’t know about my dreamin’ anymore/ All that I know is I’m falling, falling, falling, falling/Might as well fall in.” It’s tender, sorrowful, and unbelievably sexy all at once " the kind of virtuoso vocal performance whose outpouring of naked emotion recalls D’Angelo’s “Untitled (How Does It Feel)” or Sinead O’Connor’s “Nothing Compares 2 U.” One YouTube user’s comment on “The Wilhelm Scream’s” music video claims: “Listening to this on public transport at night with good headphones is like mixing a panic attack with an orgasm.” Even without personal experience, I find it difficult to disagree.

For something so mechanized and spartan, you’ll feel a hell of a lot of things when you listen to this album. Minimalistic and delicate in execution, but gigantic in impact, James Blake is as much a personal paean to the complexity of Blake’s emotions as it is a universal mirror of our own. It’s hard to see how Blake will improve upon this record, but then again, I don’t think anyone saw the evolution between Klavierwerke and James Blake coming either. So delve in deeply and let this album take you where it will. And be sure to wear headphones.



Recent reviews by this author
Grizzly Bear ShieldsThe xx Coexist
Animal Collective Centipede HzAriel Pink's Haunted Graffiti Mature Themes
Frank Ocean Channel OrangeFiona Apple The Idler Wheel...
user ratings (956)
Chart.
3.8
excellent
other reviews of this album
1 of

Comments:Add a Comment 
Drsmith4
May 23rd 2011



1712 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0 | Sound Off

Smells like Pitchfork to me. Not a bad review, though. Just think Blake's a bit overrated. I've said it before, but this is music to pet cats to.

StrangerofSorts
Contributing Reviewer
May 23rd 2011



2714 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

I can't say I agree with how good this album is, it didn't really seem to have any lasting appeal for me.

Also, I smell Pitchfork as well.

beefshoes
May 23rd 2011



2865 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Yeah, pretty much.
I love James Blake.

Digging: Ulver - Messe I.X-VI.X

psykonaut
May 23rd 2011



3913 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

this is a terrific review, man.

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
May 23rd 2011



30868 Comments


As an up and coming dubstep producer, Blake’s been at the center of a sonic movement (detailed more fully in Pitchfork article New Vocabulary) that began in 2008 with Burial’s landmark album Untrue,


No it didn't. And Untrue came out in '07 fyi

Digging: FaltyDL - In The Wild

Gyromania
May 23rd 2011



15198 Comments


Everyone treats Burial's Untrue like it was the first and only dubstep album ever made.

Lucid
Contributing Reviewer
May 23rd 2011



7021 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

cause it's the best

Digging: Shabazz Palaces - Lese Majesty

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
May 23rd 2011



30868 Comments


Will Bevan could record himself farting and half the userbase would 5/5 it

Titan50
May 24th 2011



4588 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Thanks for reminding me how much I love this

WashboardSuds
May 24th 2011



4983 Comments


ugh I need to get this

Digging: Acid Bath - When the Kite String Pops

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
May 24th 2011



30868 Comments


I'm gonna have to find that Pitchfork article

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
May 24th 2011



30868 Comments


Lol, first paragraph of the Pitchfork article and they already mention witch house. They do love to follow their misinformed blogs don't they?

Tyrael
May 24th 2011



20727 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Gotta love pitchfork

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
May 24th 2011



30868 Comments


The article makes no mention of this "sonic revolution" beginning with Untrue, they even mention The KLF. So they're not entirely stupid. So my question for the reviewer is, what makes you think that anything started with Burial? And if so, what was it?

demigod!
May 24th 2011



43835 Comments


pitchfork



gr

Digging: Black Flag - My War

omnipanzer
May 24th 2011



21418 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

This album is horrible.

Digging: Grant Lee Buffalo - Fuzzy

psykonaut
May 24th 2011



3913 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

where are all the filthy drops? this sux

plane
Staff Reviewer
May 24th 2011



6085 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0 | Sound Off

This is a fantastic review, but a few little nitpicks. I assume the "sonic movement" you are talking about (with Burial's 2007 release, Untrue) is the rest of the world catching up to the UK's decade-long obsession with dubstep, which is fine but you should probably elaborate on that. In the last paragraph you say "anymore" rather than "anyone." Other than that, I really like your use of language here and I agree! You don't mention "Unluck" though and that is my SOTY so far, though "The Wilhelm Scream" would show up somewhere in the top 10 too.

STOP SHOUTING!
May 24th 2011



631 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

review needs more hyperbole.

MusicIsMyFavorite
May 24th 2011



405 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

awesome review

album is so good



You have to be logged in to post a comment. Login | Create a Profile





FAQ // STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS // SITE FORUM // CONTACT US

Bands: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Site Copyright 2005-2013 Sputnikmusic.com
All Album Reviews Displayed With Permission of Authors | Privacy Policy