Harold Budd and Brian Eno
The Pearl


5.0
classic

Review

by scissorlocked USER (35 Reviews)
February 11th, 2011 | 13 replies | 6,485 views


Release Date: 1984 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Chests, pearls, fishes, corals and stuff

1 of 1 thought this review was well written

Sound and vision aren’t that different at the very end. Conjunction of sounds and images has always been a way of interpreting the world. Ambient music starts off when the scenery fades, with a will to rebuild a landscape by sonic recreation. Avant Garde poet/composer Harold Budd teams up with ambient pioneer Brian Eno, and prominent producer Daniel Lanois, for the creation of The Pearl. Never again the bottom of the sea sounded so vivid and serene than on this album, on which the collaboration of the three aforementioned musicians delivers a record of unbearable beauty.

Any technical analysis of how the album manages to attain its magnificence is doomed to fall sort in terms of adequacy. The pearl is an album that needs an aesthetic approach of the listener, rather than dedication or time for its appreciation. You can still listen to it while reading or before bedtime and will still be relaxing. However, with a careful listen, the album truly unravels its dreamlike effects.

Everything that’s happening here is serene and quiet. It never gets dramatic or exaggerated. Eno’s blithely opaque soundscapes dress the scenery with patience, while Budd’s piano notes softly fall upon the passing seconds. The album's flowing within the listener, giving him the sense that he/she experiences a journey from the azure, light-transparent waters of the upper sea level (Late October), to the deep blue depths where everything seems mysterious and uncanny(Dark Eyed Sister). While the atmosphere is haunting, never anything gets hostile, and an undertone of calmness is always present. Budd’s poetic references are also present, although there are no lyrics to be found. The bottom of the sea has often be used by surrealist poets as a place where memories sleep and the unconscious is approachable. (Their Memories). Each note can be translated as an underwater movement, and each pause as a rest for admiration of the beauty that eventually peaks at “Still Return”, the record’s final moment.

Despite of its’ common use for background music, as any good ambient album has, The Pearl is able to create a world on its own. Maybe many oceanic documentaries will come to mind, and sea creatures will parade before you eyes, who knows? The only thing that’s sure is that if the ocean depths need a soundtrack, then definitely you’ll have an answer. When the lights are off, we thankfully have The Pearl.



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user ratings (40)
Chart.
4.2
excellent

Comments:Add a Comment 
scissorlocked
February 11th 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Review is kinda pretentious, but I deeply enjoyed it

This badly needed a review,and I'm not hyperbolic with the rating

like to hear your opinion

Digging: Fantastic Mr Fox - Sketches

Meatplow
February 11th 2011



5524 Comments


http://www.sputnikmusic.com/bands/Harold-Budd-and-Brian-Eno/22261/

should probably have been submitted here

in any case, great review. I will put this on my list of stuff to listen to

scissorlocked
February 11th 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

I know man,but I found it under the name of Budd only,so I submitted it here

maybe I'll try to fix it somehow

Meatplow
February 11th 2011



5524 Comments


the database is all screwy I wouldn't worry about it too much

scissorlocked
February 11th 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

yeah, I'll probably leave it there!!!

anyway,the album's golden,listen and you'll see

Voivod
Staff Reviewer
February 11th 2011



5612 Comments


Some minor modifications:


Conjunction of sounds and images has always been a way of seeing the world

interpreting or translating


recreation .Avant

fix the punctuation.


Daniel Lanois , for the creation

fix the punctuation.


is doomed to fall sort

i would say/write "is doomed to fall short in terms of completeness and adequacy"


is serene and quiet, never dramatic or exaggerated

is serene and quiet.


The album’s flowing and gives the listener a sense

The album's flowing within the listener, giving him the sense that he/she experiences a journey from...


level(Late October)

separate words.


uncanny(Dark Eyed Sister)

separate words.


found .The bottom

fix punctuation.


is approachable.( Their Memories)

fix punctuation, separate parenthesis.


have an answer .When the

fix punctuation.





Other than that, very good review, have a pos.

Digging: Mekong Delta - In A Mirror Darkly

scissorlocked
February 11th 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

holy shit Voivod, you really study these reviews!!!!

thanks bro,I'll fix what I can

Voivod
Staff Reviewer
February 11th 2011



5612 Comments


i'm submitting a paper for my phd thesis these days and i have become a complete edit freak, sorry lol

scissorlocked
February 11th 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

No man, that's good,It helps me improve

I think I fixed what I could

will your thesis be submitted in English?

Voivod
Staff Reviewer
February 11th 2011



5612 Comments


yes, fortunately, I may add.

scissorlocked
February 12th 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

wtf?no-one gives a shit about this album!It's like I put the 5 Rating for no reason!

Ponton
Emeritus
March 31st 2011



5775 Comments


this gives me a The Blue Notebooks vibe

which is awesome

Digging: Mimicking Birds - Mimicking Birds

scissorlocked
March 31st 2011



3479 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

The Blue Notebooks is a phenomenal album

thanks for reminding me that, I've almost forgotten Richter





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