Thrice
Identity Crisis


2.5
average

Review

by David Driver USER (75 Reviews)
July 6th, 2010 | 14 replies | 4,747 views


Release Date: 2000 | Tracklist

Review Summary: A melting pot of different eras and genres, Thrice’s debut really ends up being more of an eccentric showcase of influences rather than a distinguished effort.

5 of 7 thought this review was well written

Whether you like Thrice or not, you have to respect their abilities to do what very little bands can: re-invent themselves from album to album while still staying fresh and creative. Starting from their humble beginnings as high school kids, the band has offered something a little different on every new album, transforming into better musicians as the years went on. But although the band has released some widely acclaimed albums, it all had to start somewhere: Identity Crisis is the sound of a new band trying to find their bearings, and for better or worse, it shows completely.

Probably the most unique thing about Identity Crisis is the band’s ability to meld all their favourite heavy genres into one distinct style. Although I would consider a lot of these songs to be melodic punk, there are heavy instances of post-hardcore leads and thrash metal mentalities, making every song sound like a melting pot of lots of different sounds and ideas. Songs like “A Torch To End All Torches” are even divided into three separate sections: the intro sounds like something from Metallica’s early days, before a short interlude morphs into a melodic section and finally ending with punk rock-type drive. It’s a commendable sound, and there are always several distinct parts of songs on Identity Crisis that are enjoyable to listen to.

And while you’ll find yourself listening to several different genres from song to song, it seems like what the band does best on their debut album is melodic punk. California-tinged melodic punk songs like “Ultra Blue” and “T&C” don’t really offer a meld of genres like “A Torch To End All Torches” does, but they excel at catchy guitar leads and sing-a-long parts, and they stand-out as some of the album’s best songs. On the other hand, thrash metal darlings “As the Ruins Fall” and “Under Par” feature speedy guitar picking and are both pretty good in their own right. There’s obviously plenty of variety to be found on Identity Crisis, and the guys seemingly try to do their best to make it all sound streamlined.

But, alas, Identity Crisis’s biggest weak point and greatest strength, oddly enough, is the band’s utilization of several genres. While they do each genre well, this album suffers from a crippling case of schizophrenia, as every song sounds almost completely different. It’s painfully obvious that the band wears their influence on their sleeve, and it both adds and takes away to the quality of the album. It all boils down to personal preference: I can humbly acknowledge the band’s talent that is showcased here, but I’m too stricken by the straightforward genres switches and streamlined styles. When I think of other bands when I’m listening to one band’s music, that always a bad sign, and unfortunately Identity Crisis plays out like a mirror held to other genres rather than it’s own unique showcase.

With Identity Crisis, it’s obvious that the band knew how cluttered their style was at the time: standing back and listening to the obvious meld of genres they created, how could they not call this album anything but “Identity Crisis”? But like with all early albums, it was only a matter of time before these talented guys got a little less artificial with the utilization of their influences and created something all-their-own with their breakthrough follow up, The Illusion of Safety. Their debut will always be a curiosity, and I know that a lot of people really enjoy the meld of genres and sounds, but in my eyes, Identity Crisis is nothing more than a mixed-bag from a group of talented but under-developed musicians trying to find their voice.



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Comments:Add a Comment 
BigHans
July 6th 2010



26455 Comments


Good review, expect to eat about 20 Negs from Thrice fanboys.

tiesthatbind
July 6th 2010



7360 Comments


Wow, this seriously didn't have any reviews under 3.5? Good review.

All I really like from this are In Your Hands, Ultra Blue, and T&C (mainly for the solo).

cvlts
July 6th 2010



8917 Comments


yes! a david driver review!

Digging: Pedro the Lion - It's Hard To Find A Friend

Athom
Staff Reviewer
July 6th 2010



17116 Comments


neg (not really).
This was the first Thrice album that I ever got way back when I was in 8th grade. I love it to death.
I wish they would have kept "Madman" on it when they re-released the album on sub-city cos that's one
of their best songs.

Digging: Sad Lovers and Giants - Feeding the Flame

Apollo
July 6th 2010



10083 Comments

Album Rating: 3.0

haha

good review - you explained your points well

Beauville88
July 6th 2010



209 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

First I feel the wrath of the BTBAM fanboys, now the Thrice ones?

Maybe I should make a "2.0" OK Computer review or something. Complete the trifecta!

PayneTiger777
July 6th 2010



4366 Comments


I kinda agree with the rating. I haven't really listened to this album, but I've heard a few songs off of it. I love Thrice, but I prefer AITA and beyond.

Comatorium.
July 6th 2010



4007 Comments


re-invent themselves from album to album while still staying fresh and creative


contradiction?

review's pretty good, pos.

ThePalaceOfWisdom
July 6th 2010



1134 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Album is awesome, 2.5 psh get outta here.

Beauville88
July 7th 2010



209 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

contradiction?


What?

Comatorium.
July 7th 2010



4007 Comments


Just sayin if a band re-invents themselves between albums doesnt that mean their sound will be fresh anyway within the
confines of their discography?

Comatorium.
July 7th 2010



4007 Comments


Also.

T&C=Titties n' Cunts amirite?

Deviant.
Staff Reviewer
July 7th 2010



30295 Comments


Don't give up your day job

Digging: L'Orange - The Orchid Days

Beauville88
July 7th 2010



209 Comments

Album Rating: 2.5

Just sayin if a band re-invents themselves between albums doesnt that mean their sound will be fresh anyway within the
confines of their discography?


That's not so much contradictory as it is superfluous...I'm mostly using the term "fresh" to imply that the new music that the band is creating is exciting and unique.

And it is possible to re-invent yourself and become stale because of it. ie. from Nimrod to Warning, Green Day re-invented themselves from bratty pop-punk to a more mature sound. Then they re-invented themselves again on American Idiot, going from adults with a mature sound to twelve-year-olds with mascara on and talking about how much they hate the president.

I would consider Nimrod to Warning as a fresh re-inventing. I would consider Warning to American Idiot as a stale re-inventing. Bands can change from album to album, but it isn't always a fresh and exciting sound.

Thrice, on the other hand, has changed from album to album, but it's always been an invigorating change. They never really dumbed anything down or went into a questionable direction.



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