Billy Boy On Poison
Drama Junkie Queen


2.0
poor

Review

by Vegeta of Nazareth USER (21 Reviews)
March 5th, 2010 | 6 replies | 3,953 views


Release Date: 2009 | Tracklist

Review Summary: Meet the L.A. residents of faux-Britain.

4 of 5 thought this review was well written

The afterthoughts that may stick with the listener after Billy Boy On Poison’s debut album, Drama Junkie Queen most likely will not stray farther than “…So these guys are great at basic rock." Or, alternatively: "...So these guys have seen A Clockwork Orange.” And both may be true – these L.A. punks have aced every rock'n'roll test thrown at them - but then again, they’ve had plenty of time to cheat from being held back many times. Chunky garage riffs? Check. Cheesy lyrics that would make a coma victim roll their eyes? You’ve got ‘em. Maybe it’s the fact that the age of the bad boy has declined that makes singer Davis LeDuke (who is not British however much he'd like you to believe) sound like a menacing stalker rather than an aggressive seducer: ”I'm creeping through your hallway darling/Coming to make you sweat/I'll make it to your bedroom, honey/I can make you wet.

Although the Billy Boys clearly rely on textbook rock, they actually do it well, technically speaking. The years of studying how to screech exactly like The Vines’ Craig Nicholls, how to advertise Jet’s power-chord glory, and how to recreate classic rock’s most beaten-to-death guitar solos have not been wasted. If only they weren’t so transparent, there would be no catch when recognizing the flying-V ignitions of guitarist Ryan Wallengren or when enjoying flat-out rockers such as “Drive Me Insane”. The track momentarily erases your thoughts of ol’ Billy Boy literally beating classic rock idols to death by delivering a simply fun track. Herein lies the strength of Drama Junkie Queen – milking its isolated tracks. Along with the opener, you might want to also have the ‘ode to glam’ “Saturday’s Child” as a part of your random party shuffle (Just tell your friends it’s an old British rock band they’ve never heard of to turn that table of inferiority). Be warned, though: listening to the album straight through would be an unexciting and narrow journey for almost anyone.

Their weakness isn’t necessarily limited to their inability to be experiment. You’ll see however rare it is, they show small signs of poking from underneath the pile of artless snow. Frustrating enough, LeDuke has to ruin that for us, too. He comes across as seriously repelling and abominable in “Higher Power”, the band’s chance at drifting from the exhausting 4/4 routine. The movement into the guitar solo is very excellent, and the song would be a favorite if it didn’t feature LeDuke’s Hot Topic whining: "Oh sh**/F*** you/We'll do what we want to do/We rule/You suck/We don't really give a f***”. Cue the listener’s thoughts, “Oh wait…he’s serious about this rebel thing?”
Even the less obvious lyrical blunders start to irritate like in “Leaf Clover”. LeDuke had to have been holding in his urge to pat himself on the back every few seconds for annoyingly writing formal lines like "Father staggers through the door". Yep, he said father. His act is like watching a tight rope walker with a club foot and it’s what blocks the gate for Drama Junkie to travel into the guilty pleasure arena where at least it could be taken more seriously.

Aside from the poor lyrics, defeated sound, and the overall lack of daring to make anything of themselves besides your typical throwback act complete with How To Play Rock Guitar, Vol. 1 riffs, there’s no fighting it when an energetic song claims you. Drama Junkie has a decent amount of punk rockers, "On My Way" for example, and the band could’ve held their own back then. What can be concluded for Billy Boy is that for them, trying to be original is like trying to eat soup with chopsticks. If the band wants to impress and really move some bodies after this forgettable and insulting debut, it may be wise to: A) Drop the rebel act. B) Remember that only British people can form British bands. And C) Realize that underneath all of this nonsense lays some talented musicians and potential for an authentic, energetic sophomore album. If LeDuke will alow it.

Recommended: “On My Way”, “Drive Me Insane”



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Comments:Add a Comment 
ebay
March 5th 2010



501 Comments


saw these guys live at a festival last summer and they weren't very good. probably won't check this album out.

WatchItExplode
March 5th 2010



3198 Comments


You've got some chops puddles...I won't be going anywhere near this, however.

PuddlesPuddles
March 5th 2010



4763 Comments

Album Rating: 2.0

Ha thanks dude

Nah you guys aren't missing anything.
That song in the intro paragraph is actually used in that Pontiac commercial

klap
Staff Reviewer
March 5th 2010



10246 Comments


SCOTTTTYYYYY OOOOOOOOOOOOO review yesssss

Digging: The Bilinda Butchers - Heaven

EVedder27
March 5th 2010



6088 Comments


sweet review puddles

Drowninginthebathtub
September 25th 2013



1 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Don't agree with this review much at all. I found this a fantastic rock and roll album, especially
for the age range of all the musicians at the time this album was made. I'm pretty sure none of
them were of drinking age, and most of them in their late teens. The examples of weak lyrics you
gave are probably the only ones you can find, as the all the lyrics in just about every song other
than "Higher Power" are spectacular. Especially in "Another Lonely Start", which is the last and
probably best song on the album, and easily the best ballad. Your review makes me question whether
you even listened to the album all the way through and experienced the melancholic-yet-optimistic
earthly serenade. "We sleep to wake again/we die to see the ones we love again". The song is about
the unknowns of death, and for such a dark, gloomy subject, it is performed in the most colorful
way. "Saturday's Child" has guitar playing that'll make you weak at the knees. Lead guitar player
Greg West has the mind-numbing bluesy guitar skills akin to an inebriated Jimmy Page. Sure, it's a
little reminiscent of early 70s Ziggy Stardust-esque rock and roll, but what's wrong with that?
It's not like Zeppelin or Aerosmith never ripped anybody off.



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