The Number Twelve Looks Like You
Put On Your Rosy Red Glasses


5.0
classic

Review

by scyther USER (41 Reviews)
September 27th, 2009 | 18 replies | 4,725 views


Release Date: 2003 | Tracklist


4 of 4 thought this review was well written

What stood out to me first about this record was the earth-shaking, bone-breaking drumming. The utter brutality of the Number Twelve Looks Like You is best exemplified by Chris “Chree” Conger’s percussion work – this is the only full-length album of theirs that he performed on, and I think he must have been quite a driving force in the band because they suffered an unfortunate decline as they progressed past the debut. Even so, that doesn’t take away from this pure gem. With plenty of double-bass pedal, surreal guitar licks and murderous screams to go around, “Put on Your Rosey Red Glasses” is not only the Number Twelve’s best, but a classic in every sense. The time since its early 2003 release has allowed its perfection plenty of scrutiny, and nothing seems to turn it down a notch – it’s as loud and aesthetically pleasing as ever. Besides the thunderous instrumentation this record is truly groundbreaking, an ice-breaker in the conversation about whether or not this music could become popular. Even though you’re bound to see plenty of maybe ignorant young scholars with half of their hair plastered to one side of their face and a Number Twelve tee tightly grasping their malnourished lank, there is something creative about this band unlike your average drama queen. Despite them, I’m relieved that something as unusual as “Rosey Red Glasses” is vastly approved. While now in late 2009 their bizarre music is basically the genre’s norm, what they accomplished is certainly fantastic.

“Put on Your Rosey Red Glasses” is an album that was produced extraordinarily. Nothing goes unheard; even in moments of heavy distortion the music sounds like a moving collage, with different instruments trading the limelight as each song unfolds. Whisking away sanity is the band’s constant desire to be abstract, and while some might call that a contrived notion, it works, simple and plain. Directly after the soothing resolution of the angry and confused tragedy If These Bullets Could Talk, the most catastrophic song on the record takes over for a few seductively destructive seconds until we’re brought back to the serenity we so desired after four punches in the face, and an eerie recording of the narration of a letter written by a child killer who detailed their daughter’s slow and cannibalistic death to the young one’s parents (Document. Grace Budd). Civeta Dei describes a sad sacrifice with alarmingly beautiful poetry, and as one of the dual vocalists laughs a hopeless chuckle before the bridge, a sharp chill runs up to my shoulders from my back every time. Blue Dress was the first Number Twelve song I ever heard…it’s straining tension builds a fluid professionalism of verses and chorus among the mass disorder, and is easily the purest example of premeditated songwriting on an album that seems to disregard such strategy. With each song comes a new story told in a totally different way – not a single track recalls another, originality is omnipresent on this epic.

All of the band’s members are obviously skilled, especially the drummer and guitarist. In order to keep up with their blazing fashion, two singers (or more accurately, “screamers”) were enlisted to poeticize Number Twelve’s calamity. The lyrics offer martyrdom for a love who seems to have suffered much herself. As the album continues on however, it becomes obvious that doom has come and the storyteller was harshly betrayed. I think this story is far more human than fantasy though, based on the divorce littered metaphors of Blue Dress perhaps this lost love was a familial one. In the film “Devil in a Blue Dress”, the woman betrays the man and while they were nowhere near married, the lyric “to get back at your bastard’s lust” recalls the movie’s theme of finding and stopping another man looking to hurt the deceptive girlfriend of yet another man. A complex story and a complex song to boot. Essentially this is an album of duplicity and unsound conduct in its wake.

Every song is different and devoid of flaw. The creativity that must have been involved in “Rosey Red Glasses” should be regarded as an awesome feat to be surpassed and even when it is, the classic status of this album will remain for the artistic opportunity it created. The record is brief and sad but also a milestone, and it’s power has yet to be dethroned.



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user ratings (438)
Chart.
3.8
excellent
other reviews of this album
Rationalist (4)
A great album, while certainly entertaining and quirky, loses all coherency or any other positive as...

Lee Carlson (4)
...

Chris Maziejka (5)
The Number Twelve Looks Like You stole my outlook on music, and I don't ever want it back....

Matt (4)
One of the better albums I have heard by genre's of this type. The number 12 did a good job with so...


Comments:Add a Comment 
Chewie
September 27th 2009



4531 Comments


review was a little eh, but I still pos'd

elephantREVOLUTION
September 27th 2009



2727 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

this album is so amazing. i love new #12 but this definitely has something the other albums don't

Thompsonhunt
September 27th 2009



279 Comments


great album, alright review

ill tweet a pos

fromtheinside
September 27th 2009



17638 Comments


i honestly have never given this its proper dues. never took it to be 5 worthy though. hmmm maybe later tonight. review was good enough to peak my interests again, so congrats to that.

Digging: Fallujah - The Flesh Prevails

Comatorium.
September 27th 2009



4077 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Jon Karel>Chree

Gyromania
September 27th 2009



15162 Comments


really good album. i once had this at a 5, but after many listens its replay value goes down. if these bullets could talk and civeta day are the best songs. bambi the hooker and a case of beer sucks ass though.

Comatorium.
September 27th 2009



4077 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

blasphemy^

TAB
September 27th 2009



447 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Just a correction, POYRRG is a EP, not a full length.

scyther
September 27th 2009



1606 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

I dunno their website lists it as an album.

mynameischan
Staff Reviewer
September 27th 2009



17920 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

your other review is bertter

scyther
September 27th 2009



1606 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Yeah it was more interesting but I hate the way I used to write.

elephantREVOLUTION
September 27th 2009



2727 Comments

Album Rating: 4.5

Jon Karel>Chree

karel is waaaaay better. but the drums on this album fit it very well and they are still really good.

Comatorium.
September 27th 2009



4077 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

^that

TAB
September 29th 2009



447 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

It's definently a EP, i mean, the fact that its only like 21 minutes pretty much confirms this.

scyther
September 29th 2009



1606 Comments

Album Rating: 5.0

Thats just some stupid industry generalization. The artist considers this a full length album, thats good enough for me.

KritikalMotion
September 29th 2009



2261 Comments

Album Rating: 3.5

Prefer their newer stuff really. I listened to this after hearing Mongrel though.

TrojanWhore
September 29th 2009



752 Comments

Album Rating: 4.0

Band are so good live. Pretty weird onstage but it isn't surprising.

I prefer mid-era #12 - old stuff is very decent but they found their niche with nuclear.sad.nuclear and then Mongrel.

Worse Than Alone has grown on me since I got it on vinyl quite cheap though.

Rationalist
November 12th 2009



880 Comments


post above is amazing.



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